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  1. #41
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
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    Greensboro, NC
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    35,498

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    Quote Originally Posted by Eclectic Horseman View Post
    To a certain extent that is true. Some of the problems also come from how it is cooked however (the mutagens produced by high heat being carcinogenic.) Also look at the latest research on carnitine. It seems to be implicated in heart disease even more than cholesterol, and these findings indicate that limited intake of any meat may be best for health.
    I've seen the articles on the carnitine. Sketchy at best And, as I originally said, meat is not something anyone needs to be eating a lot of. People eat it too many days a week and portion sizes are much too big.

    http://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/n...e-201304176083

    people who eat unprocessed red meat regularly have, at worst, only a slightly higher risk of developing heart disease. Unprocessed red meat includes virtually all fresh cuts of beef, pork, lamb, and the like.“If you look at people who eat unprocessed red meat, there is a relatively weak association with heart disease,” Dr. Mozaffarian says. “It’s not protective—and healthier dietary choices exist—but major harms are also not seen.”


    It's a good article on the gotchas around all the tentative links. For example, processed meats are generally not good for you, but they also contain less L-carnitine than unprocesse meat, as well as taking an L-carnitine supplement may help heart attack survivors
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  2. #42
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2003
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    6,098

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    Quote Originally Posted by JB View Post
    I've seen the articles on the carnitine. Sketchy at best And, as I originally said, meat is not something anyone needs to be eating a lot of. People eat it too many days a week and portion sizes are much too big.

    http://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/n...e-201304176083

    It's a good article on the gotchas around all the tentative links. For example, processed meats are generally not good for you, but they also contain less L-carnitine than unprocesse meat, as well as taking an L-carnitine supplement may help heart attack survivors [/COLOR]
    Thanks for the link JB, but my take away is a little different from a meateater's.

    But on this we can definitely agree, people eat portions of meat that are way too large and they also eat it at too many meals (some people eat meat 3 meals a day!)
    "Against stupidity the gods themselves contend in vain" ~Friedrich Schiller



  3. #43
    Join Date
    Mar. 16, 2000
    Location
    Chatham, NY USA
    Posts
    4,100

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    Quote Originally Posted by starhorse View Post
    You guys are amazing!

    A few questions:
    1) In terms of buying fresh veggies when on sale and then freezing... just ziplock bag it? Or this is where the foodsaver comes in?
    2) Do frozen veggies have any less nutritional value?
    3) Really intrigued about homegrown veggies. Any tips on where/how to start? Good reads or advice?
    Check on e-Bay for the old Farm Journal book on canning & freezing. Don't know real title off the top of my head.

    Buy local, fresh veggies and blanch quickly, then 'dry' as much as you can, and freeze. If we have a lot, I use the vacuum sealer; if not, I double-bag (plastic). Whoever mentioned the travel-time for most store-bought 'fresh' veggies is absolutely correct - Hannaford, Wegman's, ShopRite (around us) all carry local produce in season. Buy IN SEASON and freeze your own. Buying 'fresh' out of season requires long travel, then storage, times.

    For just you, one or two plants of nearly anything should suffice. Squash and potatoes take over the world, but if you're going to be in the rental until next spring, plant one of white and sweet potatoes - you'll have a lot, although we never got white potatoes to keep as well as they are supposed to. Zucchini & summer squash, also, don't need more than one plant to keep you in business. Buy a package of mixed lettuces (seeds) and plant a bit at a time to keep you in salad all summer. Lettuce doesn't keep well, as you probably know, so just keep it coming all season long!

    Have fun!
    www.ayliprod.com
    Equine Photography in the Northeast



  4. #44
    Join Date
    May. 5, 2011
    Posts
    1,713

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    Learn what day/time of day the supermarket marks meat down. Go then. Usually the sell by tomorrow stuff get marked half off sometime in the evening. It's perfectly good and will last another week or so in the fridge and several months in the freezer if you package it right.

    Shop farmers markets when you can. I used to walk to town with my dog every Saturday in college and stock up on the weeks veggies and fruits. Meat can also be less expensive there. You also may be able to buy half or a quarter of a cow or pig. It's more expensive up front, but usually cheaper in the long run.

    I do a similar salad starter thing. Make a big salad base (at this point I cheat and get the pre cut stuff, but its cheaper to assemble it yourself). If I make chicken one night for dinner, I'll make enough to cut up and put on a portion of the salad for lunch the next day.

    Tupperware containers are your friend. Portion out meals you can eat now or freeze for later. I like the ones that snap together and stack.

    Make meats and veggies that aren't quite the freshest, but still edible into soups or stews. Even if its summer and you don't want to eat it now. Cook it up (I cheat and throw things in a crock pot...) and freeze it for the colder months.

    Learn to make things from scratch. Usually the initial outlay for a base of supplies is more expensive, but in the long run you'll save money. You'll eat healthier too.

    I really like the Farmers Wife cookbook series. The recipes are all older style how people made things before processed this and that. At least one of them talks about how to make your own broths and soup bases from scratch.

    Also, read the blog Poor Girl Eats Well. Her recipes are delicious and she feeds herself extremely inexpensively.



  5. #45
    Join Date
    Mar. 27, 2001
    Location
    North County, San Diego
    Posts
    590

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    If you've never gardened before, and you're planning on moving next year, you might want to try Earthboxes. They're perfect for limited space. Make sure there is water in the reservoir and you'll never under or over water. Follow their directions explicitly for planting, and you'll have great results. I have ten of them (they were a perfect foil against a gopher invasion we had a few years ago) and I'm being overrun by spaghetti squash & tomatoes. I grow beans, peas, lettuce, kale and herbs in them as well. The only thing that I've found that doesn't do quite so well in them is root veggies like carrots.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #46
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    35,498

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    Just avoid white potatoes, either for buying or planting. They just have so little nutritional value (which is part of the OP's thread ) they aren't worth it. For a bit extra startup costs, you can reap much more nutritional benefit from blue/purple potatoes. You'll still save a whole bunch of money if taters are something you like to eat a lot of.

    cooking from scratch is usually healthier, but not always cheaper at all I can't find any good chocolate Mousse recipe to make myself that is remotely near the low cost of a boxed mix I still do it, because I do it infrequently enough that the extra $$ is worth it, but it's not at all cheap.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  7. #47
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2005
    Location
    between the mountains and the sea, North Carolina
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    2,936

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    In Harris Teeter and other similar stores, it is cheaper to buy chicken breasts from the meat counter than in the prepackaged area. My sister told me this and I couldn't believe it, because in the UK the meat counter is way more expensive, but it is TRUE.

    Grow fresh herbs. That will save you a fortune.

    Cook 1 meal a week for dinner & it will last you assuming you eat out 1x a week. That is a huge money saver because you are only buying 1 set of ingredients instead of 4 or 5.

    I love fish cakes, so I buy salmon in bulk and make my own with Jamie Oliver's recipe (basically its salmon + red potatoes + lemon + parsley). Very simple, easy to freeze/reheat, and delicious. This has saved me so much money because instead of stopping for food on the way home after a late evening class I know I have fish cakes waiting - far healthier and yummier.

    For a snack, buy fresh popcorn kernels instead of the bagged microwavable stuff. Way cheaper and way more delicious.
    "Choose to chance the rapids, and dare to dance the tides" - Garth Brooks
    "With your permission, dear, I'll take my fences one at a time" - Maggie Smith, Downton Abbey



  8. #48
    Join Date
    Sep. 30, 2011
    Posts
    414

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    I also try to eat very healthy on a budget.

    My best tips:
    - find a local (non-chain) store for fruits and veggies, preferably one that only sells fruits and veggies as you will find you pay a lot less (at least that has been my experience in all the places I've lived)

    - "international" market/grocery stores often stock products like unusual grains/starches for much less than conventional grocery stores or stores like Whole Foods

    - dry lentils and beans are cheap and delicious and can be incorporated into a number of delicious crock pot recipes if you have access to them

    - homemade hummus is cheap, easy and healthy

    - buy meat in bulk, repackage and freeze

    - eat as seasonally as possible

    - garden - even a small herb garden on the kitchen windowsill can save you $ overtime and make your meals very delicious

    - overall, don't buy anything relatively non-perishable in a pre-packaged container if you can purchase it in bulk

    - and although we are intermittently excellent and awful at this, my SO and I find that when we sit down and plan a whole week's worth of meals (including some sort of lunch item that can be pre-made either on Sunday for the entire week or from mid-week leftovers) we save a lot of money and have little or no waste in terms of unused food spoiling.



  9. #49
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2003
    Location
    Middleburg, VA
    Posts
    12,752

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    I've linked this website before- http://plantbasedonabudget.com/

    I haven't done a ton on it yet (partly because I'm in my "too hot and tired for anything other than a GIANT salad" phase) but my vegan brother has, as has my mom. GOOD recipes and it is geared for eating vegan/plant based without killing yourself financially. I think it is a worthy website to really go through.

    I eat a lot of beans (black, chick peas, red beans, etc). They are pretty cheap and yummy and super versatile.

    I don't buy meat. I just don't. I will OCCASIONALLY buy some canned chicken to throw in a salad or something else, but, really, I don't buy chicken or beef. I don't like to cook it, so that helps. I save my meat urges for dinners out...which might be once a week, or a couple of times a month (if that. I'm not a big meat eater). I don't buy any meatless protein things except occasionally. I'm not big on them, anyway, so why spend the money?

    Growing things is awesome! I have a bunch of containers on my porch. I'm slowly getting the hang of it, so I don't grow much more than tomatoes and peepers, but my best friend grows TONS of things on her patio.

    Re: farmer's markets. Be careful. The one I used to shop at was VERY cheap and I could buy way, way more than I could eat. But I went to the little local one here in town one day last summer and spent a fortune. So, choose wisely before going and shopping.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #50
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 1999
    Location
    Mendocino County, CA: Turkey Vulture HQ
    Posts
    14,295

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    Go to the farmer's market in the last half hour, when they're packing up, and eyeing the stuff they don't really want to take home.

    Check out all your local markets and get a feel for what they stock at what prices. The best produce for quality and selection in my town is at FoodMaxx... not the natural foods store, not the upscale grocery. Whoever their buyer is has an amazing eye and a great sense of bargains, so he'll buy the off size or the excess and it's usually all really good quality.

    Buy the fruits and veggies that are cheap. Those are the ones in season, at the top of their quality. Change your menu when you need to.

    Buy rice in 20 lb bags.

    A small garden is great. Small tomatoes are perhaps one of the best bang-for-the-buck things you can grow, and you can grow them on a patio in a pot if you must.

    A blog you might enjoy is http://www.lavidalocavore.org .
    If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket



  11. #51
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 1999
    Location
    Mendocino County, CA: Turkey Vulture HQ
    Posts
    14,295

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    If you want to freeze fresh fruits or veggies, you usually need to blanch them first (dip in boiling water for a minute). To be honest, unless you have lots of time, or the fruits/veggies are free (say from your own garden) I'm not sure this is worth the effort. Your time is worth something, and the bags have a cost, and you'll have to make sure it gets eaten, and you'll probably save only a few dollars. Frozen foods in the supermarket will also be seasonal (watch for sales), and they have better equipment for flash-freezing.

    Instead, if you have a bounty of a specific veggie, I'd suggest cooking it into something and freezing that.
    If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket



  12. #52
    Join Date
    Jul. 28, 2004
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    500

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    Sorry if someone already mentioned this (haven't had time to review previous pages) but check out the blog Poor Girl Eats Well. www.poorgirleatswell.com



  13. #53
    Join Date
    Apr. 22, 2011
    Location
    the Armpit of the Nation
    Posts
    3,160

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    LauraKY wrote " my favorite sunflower "meat" balls. I make sesame noodles with tahini (loaded with veggies too"

    Laura, I'm sure I'm not the only one who would love to see these recipes...*wink wink, nudge nudge*



  14. #54
    Join Date
    Feb. 25, 2011
    Location
    So California
    Posts
    2,470

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    Quote Originally Posted by tm View Post
    If you've never gardened before, and you're planning on moving next year, you might want to try Earthboxes. They're perfect for limited space. Make sure there is water in the reservoir and you'll never under or over water. Follow their directions explicitly for planting, and you'll have great results. I have ten of them (they were a perfect foil against a gopher invasion we had a few years ago) and I'm being overrun by spaghetti squash & tomatoes. I grow beans, peas, lettuce, kale and herbs in them as well. The only thing that I've found that doesn't do quite so well in them is root veggies like carrots.
    I learned an interesting thing about growing carrots in a pot or container: the key is to make sure the container is 8" to 12" deeper than the length of the carrot, so quite deep.



  15. #55
    Join Date
    Feb. 25, 2011
    Location
    So California
    Posts
    2,470

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    One more tip which is appropriate for anyone shopping for food: Don't shop on an empty stomach.



  16. #56
    Join Date
    Aug. 12, 2010
    Location
    Westford, Massachusetts
    Posts
    3,399

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    Bulk buying is hard with one person, but if you can figure out the best way to store various things, so they keep well, that reduces food costs. Big bags of dried beans, rice, etc... As expensive as Whole Foods is reputed to be, I save quite a bit of money by going to their bulk section and buying things like quinoa and steel cut oats loose, rather than packaged versions. There, you can buy as little as you want, as you fill the bags yourself.

    When it's cooler and I don't mind heating up the house by running the oven for a while, I'll sometimes roast a whole, big, chicken on Sunday. That will last us most of the week (three people and a couple of dogs). If I watch for sales, I can get an 8 lb chicken for under $10. We eat roast chicken, chicken salad, chicken tacos, etc...then I take the carcass, put it in the crockpot with some past their prime veggies overnight and freeze the resultant stock in 2 cup portions (use freezer bags, they'll lie flat and save room). I never have to buy canned chicken stock...not only saves money, but I can avoid all the salt in most commercial stocks. If it were just me and I couldn't finish a whole chicken in a reasonable amount of time, I'd freeze some cooked and cut up chicken for making soups and things later.



  17. #57
    Join Date
    Apr. 8, 2004
    Location
    The Great, uh, Green (?!?!) North!
    Posts
    3,718

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    Don't buy any pre-made "health foods" for starters! I shake my head at the tiny little boxes of pre-herbed quinoa etc. Heck, even just cooking for yourself is a significant step up from eating prepared foods health-wise.

    I eat meat, but not in huge quantities, and I've found going with a high quality meat direct from the farmer costs about the same, but it goes further as I don't eat as much to feel "full". Also, look for small/family run meat processors who will offer "value pack" type things. They usually have some small ones that will fit in an average fridge/freezer combo and I find I save up to 30%. I'm lucky to live on the edge of a rural area - all the meat is raised and processed locally.

    If you're in an urban area but often outside of it, do your groceries in the 'burbs. Real estate is cheaper and costs are lower.

    For dry goods, check out Amazon.com and buy in semi-bulk. No, not kidding!

    On my back porch I have Spinach, tomatoes, bush beans and herbs all growing in pots. Peppers, zucchinis also can do well
    "Adulthood? You're playing with ponies. That is, like, every 9 year old girl's dream. Adulthood?? You're rocking the HELL out of grade 6, girl."



  18. #58
    Join Date
    Oct. 29, 1999
    Posts
    14,496

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    You can also grow a few veggies, like tomatoes, cucumbers? in hanging buckets like these http://www.kdhnc.com/images/pages/N2...%20Buckets.jpg

    I eat lots of sandwiches. I buy a pound of ham from the deli, and ask them to chip it. Then I divide it into 4 bags when I get home, and freeze. Each day, my ham sandwich is 1/4 a bag, or ONE ounce. My ham sandwiches are less than 150 calories each (mustard "0" not mayo) + vegies.

    I also make BLTs, with a teeny bit of miracle whip on one side, wet tomatoes on the other, ONE slice of bacon, in pieces. Hey, it tastes like a BLT for about 170 calories.

    Grilled cheese = spray Olivio on WW bread, ONE slice of cheese, for 160 calories.

    I like Pesto Pasta - tiny bit of Olive oil for fried onions, & pesto with rotini pasta. I make a batch and freeze 5-6 servings, thaw, and top with a bit of Parmesian.

    When I buy strawberries, and blackberries, I dip them in a 1 part white vinegar, 10 parts water, then dry to make them last in the fridge for much longer.

    Some veggies last a long time. Brussel sprouts, sugar snap peas, carrots, peppers last weeks. I find that Romaine lettuce in smaller heads lasts me much longer than other kinds.



  19. #59
    Join Date
    Jun. 16, 2001
    Location
    Los Angeles, California
    Posts
    3,327

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    Quote Originally Posted by Eclectic Horseman View Post
    Stop eating meat. Period. No matter how lean it is, it really isn't good for you or for the environment.
    How about eggs, milk or shellfish (lobster, crab)?
    The Denver Broncos went to visit an orphanage. "It's so sad looking into their faces so devoid of hope." Sara aged 6



  20. #60
    Join Date
    Oct. 25, 2012
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    3,786

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    That is pure, unadulterated BILGE that meat, even fatty meat, is no good for you.
    Propaganda, not fact. Truth is, without meat you are lacking a number of essential long-chain fatty acids that can neither be synthesized in the human body nor obtained from plants. Every indigenous tribe that ever lived on Earth ate meat. But it was not feedlotted, grain-fed, antibiotic and steroid-laced, so source your stuff with foreknowledge!

    We evolved with our eyes on the front of our heads for a REASON--we are a carnivorous predator species. That's how we survived the Ice Age, during which time the significant growth of our brain size and complexity separated us from the great apes.

    What we DID NOT evolve to eat is GMO corn, soy, flour refined from grain, and sugar except in the miniscule quantities obtainable from wild (small, sour) fruit.

    You CAN and SHOULD eat protein and fat from animals--but NOT industrially-synthesized seed oils, refined flour and sugar, and the processed foods made with them.

    At least, if you'd like to wear your Pikeurs and not live on pills . . .


    2 members found this post helpful.

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