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  1. #21
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    Jan. 28, 2013
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    You can also play music with your donkey. Here is our boy, Donkeyotee:

    (Disclaimer: This is from a year ago and I am an adult beginner. I can actually play much better now, LOL!).

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Aui2...UJuLLA&index=8


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  2. #22
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    Sep. 12, 2009
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    526

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    Are they VERY susceptible to founder/laminitis? I've wanted one (like the OP, preferably a mini but have considered a standard as well) but haven't wanted to get one if I couldn't care for it properly. I have four geldings at home who are out in my two one-acre pastures during the day (normally no additional hay is required, although this year with the drought I did have to start throwing hay around June or July) and they come in to their stalls at night. I've always been worried about foundering a donk if they can't be on grass during the day as I don't really have a good way to separate everyone without causing a ton of commotion.
    It's not about the color of the ribbon but the quality of the ride. Having said that, I'd like the blue one please!



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Apr. 17, 2002
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    between the barn and the pond
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    Grazing muzzles are your friend.



  4. #24
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    Aug. 2, 2001
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    Ft Worth, TX, USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by katarine View Post
    Grazing muzzles are your friend.
    So true! My mini-Vinny wears his every year from Mar-Jun.

    I can echo almost all of the favorable posts above! Vinny is my "maintenance free pet". I trim his feet myself as well as vaccinating and worming. Only times he's seen the vet is for teeth, and once for stitches when he got kicked in the head by one of the horses. I firmly believe it was an accident because all of my horses love him. He's been a companion to several different equines, from weanlings to retirees.

    You do have to introduce new dogs with care, and yes, he is LOUD
    "Everyone will start to cheer, when you put on your sailin shoes"-Lowell George

    What's the status on Tuco?



  5. #25
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    Aug. 2, 2001
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    Ft Worth, TX, USA
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    woops!
    Last edited by Toadie's mom; Feb. 5, 2013 at 10:41 PM. Reason: duplicate post
    "Everyone will start to cheer, when you put on your sailin shoes"-Lowell George

    What's the status on Tuco?



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Apr. 30, 2005
    Location
    Rappahannock County VA
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    629

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    Resistance is futile
    I ride a mule. I paint dogs.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Aug. 20, 2012
    Location
    Rutland, England, by way of Hawaii
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    217

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    Quote Originally Posted by drawstraws View Post
    Are they VERY susceptible to founder/laminitis? I've wanted one (like the OP, preferably a mini but have considered a standard as well) but haven't wanted to get one if I couldn't care for it properly. I have four geldings at home who are out in my two one-acre pastures during the day (normally no additional hay is required, although this year with the drought I did have to start throwing hay around June or July) and they come in to their stalls at night. I've always been worried about foundering a donk if they can't be on grass during the day as I don't really have a good way to separate everyone without causing a ton of commotion.
    For years my standard donkeys, Dave and Poppy, shared fields with my Shire horses. One particularly lush Spring my farrier suggested the donks were getting too much grass. So, we fenced off an area in one of the fields and that has become the donkeys' permanent pasture. If it gets too green we strip graze it. If we have drought conditions, they get less grass, which really isn't a bad thing.

    We lost Dave in August, so now we've got a small standard, a 14h3" Poitou, and a 10 months old Poitou sharing that field. We will have to play it by ear, but the problem is the standard, Poppy. If turnout time appears to be very green, she may have to start wearing a grazing muzzle. I would think a mini would be very difficult to manage with horses because the mini's needs would be more than met if it were grazing in fields adequate for horses.



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jun. 30, 2005
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    2,185

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    I rescued a Jenny that was 6 weeks from foaling. Mr. DDK was totally against it until I told him the conditions she was living in. He said that I could buy her, let her have her baby and sell them both....One adorable jack baby later and 11 months .......they are going to live with us forever....per Mr. DDK

    Donkey's are wonderful animals!! They are very tidy and mine only poop in one area of their paddock and never in their stall. They are the funniest creatures and keep us laughing for sure I am lucky and mine are not easy keepers so they can have the same diet as the horses.
    RIP Sucha Smooth Whiskey
    May 17,2004 - March 29, 2010
    RIP San Lena Peppy
    May 3, 1991 - March 11, 2010


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Feb. 26, 2008
    Location
    Michigan
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    1,420

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    IMO - grazing muzzles are a donkeys bestest friends.

    its been my experience that they accept them much easier than a horse does. they learn to carefully eat through the hole instead of grinding away at the plastic all day. they are very smart.

    Mine are out on a 12 acre pasture with the horses all year. They are in grazing muzzles (E-Z breathe) from May to October, when they are out during the day

    make sure you sew protection around the nose and chin part of the muzzle though, because it will rub their little faces

    in the mornings I just throw a small cookie in the muzzle and they put their little heads in them, halter them up and out they go. and then the muzzles come off at night when everyone is pulled into the inner paddocks. what they pull through their muzzles is all the food they get in the summer months, and they do great

    yes, they can get laminitis/founder... and when they get it, its BAD... really bad....



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2005
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    Upstate NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jumpin_Horses View Post
    its been my experience that they accept them much easier than a horse does. they learn to carefully eat through the hole instead of grinding away at the plastic all day.
    I guess no one ever told my horses that they were supposed to 'grind away at the plastic all day'.

    OP, if you get a donk we require photos.


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  11. #31
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    Feb. 26, 2008
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    Michigan
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    Quote Originally Posted by trubandloki View Post
    I guess no one ever told my horses that they were supposed to 'grind away at the plastic all day'.

    OP, if you get a donk we require photos.
    we have 4 out of 6 in grazing muzzles. 2 of the horses we have put in them actually chew through the hole, making it bigger, and fight the muzzles at first.... the donkeys do not do this. We have to replace the "short eared" muzzles every year, but, can reuse the donkey's

    but, this has OBVIOUSLY been MY experience, not yours.... hence my quote:
    its been ***my experience*** that they accept them much easier than a horse does.
    good LORD! cant I say ANYTHING on this topic?????... I really do have donkey experience... JEESH! (leaving this topic now) I hope I was able to help at least one person here... OP - good luck with your new donkey. Im sure you will be a good owner. getting all the info you can beforehand...



  12. #32
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    Apr. 17, 2002
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    between the barn and the pond
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    Jumpin_Horses, calm down.



  13. #33
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    Jun. 30, 2006
    Location
    Middle Tennessee
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    5,120

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    I moved my 2 horses home in December and they never quite settled in. That is, until we got a standard jennet weanling two weeks ago. She has been the most wonderful addition! My horses are SO much happier and more content now that their herd has expanded. My TB gelding is enamored with her and my WB mare now has a playmate and someone to boss around.

    Sure, she has vet/farrier/dentist expenses, but she eats virtually nothing. I throw a handful of feed in a pan to let her do something at feeding time and toss an extra flake of bermuda grass hay AM and PM. She's already getting too fat on that. (I foresee a grazing muzzle in the not-so-distant future...)

    My husband loves her, too.
    Don't fall for a girl who fell for a horse just to be number two in her world... ~EFO



  14. #34
    Join Date
    Aug. 2, 2004
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    Whidbey Is, Wash.
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    Quote Originally Posted by morganpony86 View Post

    Can the donkey enablers fill me in on realistic expectations for upkeep of a donkey/mini-donk in relation to the horses? It would be joining two easy-keeper old (20's) Morgans maintained on pasture and coastal Bermuda hay, and my 6 year old TB show horse, when he comes home from boarding during off-seasons.
    Minimal upkeep, get their feet done on probably the same schedule as everyone else. Ditto for annual care, but otherwise tough as nails. Rory kicked Odie in the head one time, sounded like a home run baseball hit (I almost died) and Odie went flying to the ground, got up and started grazing. Couldn't figure out why I was fussing around, looking in his mouth, etc. He gets turnout with Rory on minimal grass, if you watch my video you will see we are literally under water this year and have no grass, and he's a fatty mcfatfat.

    I love him. Rory loves him. He's evil but so danged cute.

    Odie and Rory, BFFs
    Nappin'
    Hateful face while getting vacuumed
    Cute face out handgrazing
    Most adorable Odie pic ever


    My favorite video of my boys
    Odie chasing Rory, Rory chasing Odie, playing.
    COTH's official mini-donk enabler

    "I am all for reaching out, but in some situations it needs to be done with a rolled up news paper." Alagirl



  15. #35
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    Aug. 2, 2004
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    Whidbey Is, Wash.
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    Quote Originally Posted by microbovine View Post
    You can also play music with your donkey. Here is our boy, Donkeyotee:

    (Disclaimer: This is from a year ago and I am an adult beginner. I can actually play much better now, LOL!).

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Aui2...UJuLLA&index=8

    Ohhhh my gawd. I gotta try this with Odie, though Rory would be the one to start making funny noises.
    COTH's official mini-donk enabler

    "I am all for reaching out, but in some situations it needs to be done with a rolled up news paper." Alagirl



  16. #36
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    Aug. 2, 2004
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    Whidbey Is, Wash.
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    You have gotten some great advice, but I'll say that it's the same as with horses, dogs, kittens and cars. Everyone has good and bad things to say, experiences and advice.

    I got Odie intact at three, and he was a monster. Totally attacked the seller, rearing up and biting at him, and the guy got the halter on by draping it over his hand and letting Odie bite at his hand. We got him home, and had some shenanigans, mostly biting and he reared once and got read to from the book. But he had also been kept solitary, and having him out with Rory was the best thing ever. He became happy, social, would come across the paddock to stand next to people. Worked on getting his feet handled, and got him trimmed without having to lay him down (which can be common with donks).

    After a few months, we got him gelded. Helped with the biting .

    They are more prone to laminitis. They are not horses and can't be fed like them. We are totally saturated and I haven't had ANY skin issues with Odie, but I did just place an order for a sheet so I can clip him because I think he looks a little uncared for at the moment. As a mini, he's a little parrot mouthed and I suspect when he gets his teeth done next week it'll be a little hairy looking. Minis are prone to having issues such as parrot mouth and breathing issues. When he was gelded and was tranq'ed on the ground, it sounded scary. But he can breath fine running around harassing his bestie.
    COTH's official mini-donk enabler

    "I am all for reaching out, but in some situations it needs to be done with a rolled up news paper." Alagirl



  17. #37
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    Jan. 21, 2010
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    2,201

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    Oh my God, TheJenners, those photos and videos are absolutely adorable. I can only hope the hopefully-soon-to-be-acquired-morganpony-minidonk gets along as well with the equines as yours does!

    Quote Originally Posted by TheJenners View Post
    You have gotten some great advice, but I'll say that it's the same as with horses, dogs, kittens and cars. Everyone has good and bad things to say, experiences and advice.
    Very true. But this does give me a lot to think about. I did not know that they are more sensitive to cold than the horses. I'm a blanket fiend, coming from the far north, but none of my 20 blankets are small enough to fit a mini-donk.



  18. #38
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    Jul. 13, 2011
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    East Longmeadow, MA
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    I believe I have said this before, but count me as one VERY dedicated member ofo the Odie and Rory fan club!
    What's wrong with you?? Your cheese done slid off its cracker?!?!



  19. #39
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    Apr. 30, 2005
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    Rappahannock County VA
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    Quote Originally Posted by morganpony86 View Post
    Very true. But this does give me a lot to think about. I did not know that they are more sensitive to cold than the horses. I'm a blanket fiend, coming from the far north, but none of my 20 blankets are small enough to fit a mini-donk.
    I don't know where you live but we've bred mini donkeys for over 10 years, with an average of 10-15 in residence at any one time. As long as they have adequate hay and shelter, they do not need to be blanketed. Nor imho should they be--they have those thick fluffy coats for a reason; blanketing would only flatten the air spaces between hairs and probably not keep them as warm as their own coats would. The only exception would be very young foals born in winter (but a stall with heat lamps is probably better because they are born fuzzy anyway) or an animal coming from a non-winter climate into a winter one that might not have grown sufficient coat to keep warm. The key to keeping warm besides staying dry is having a sufficient amount of hay in their bellies at all times. Ours have access to their round bales 24/7 in winter.

    That said...horse-blanket like designs in dog blankets work well for smaller mini donks. What fits a large dog such as a golden retriever or bigger would likely fit a mini donk. One of the issues is they have such narrow chests and straight shoulders that blankets for mini horses tend to gape there.

    When I was feeding square bales, each donkey got 1 flake morning and 2 flakes evenings in winter...sometimes an extra flake in the a.m. if it was super cold. In summer, they just get grass...our pastures are not "lush" ... just average...and they still get too fat on it and have to go to the "starvation paddock" once in awhile. We don't feed hard feed at all, but lots of treats. And of course there is access to salt block and water (in winter all the troughs have heaters in them). Donkeys drink maybe 2 gallons of water each per day.

    We have their feet trimmed every 12 weeks (rocky sandy soil and several acres to roam helps keep them worn down here). We give our own shots, mainly rabies and a 3-way or 4-way that includes tetanus. We don't give PHF or WNV. We worm every 8 weeks with paste...I just walk into the pasture and everyone starts begging for their "treat" ... it's hilarious.

    Tip about halters...horse weanling halters fit nicely. Mini horse halters are usually too small except for the very smallest of donkeys. Our 30" girls can wear mini horse halters; but the 33-34" ones need horse weanling halters. I try to buy the ones with the lightest weight hardware possible...all that clanking heavy metal on a wee donkey's head bugs me.
    I ride a mule. I paint dogs.


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  20. #40
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    Aug. 2, 2004
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    Whidbey Is, Wash.
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    OH! I totally forgot to add, OP, but Odie and Rory obviously share a paddock and also their stall. It's a standard 12x12, and the dirt run is always open, so I'm not sure how "safe" it would be if they were closed in a bedded stall and both wanted to lay down... But as you can see, they snuggle right up outside just as close as a stall would make them. Odie does love to roll and I'm sure he'd delight in bedding once he got used to it.

    He's pretty fluffy and I've never seen him be cold, so that's a new one on me too. It doesn't really make sense; if they are "desert" animals, because desert nights are frigid, then I don't think that argument would hold water.
    COTH's official mini-donk enabler

    "I am all for reaching out, but in some situations it needs to be done with a rolled up news paper." Alagirl



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