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  1. #41
    Join Date
    Nov. 6, 2002
    Location
    Henrico, NC 36 30'50.49" N 77 50'17.47" W
    Posts
    5,854

    Default

    Something else must be wrong. If the bearings are worn out in the hubs, and/or the axle is bent, the tires will rub, and be very hard to push. Two tires should carry any load someone would be pushing.



  2. #42
    Join Date
    Mar. 27, 2009
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    2,243

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    Quote Originally Posted by seabreeze View Post
    My two-wheeled Rubbermaid has taken a true beating. I never protect it, never "take care" of it...leave it out, toss it around, just plain abuse it. I think it's going into it's 14th year. Quite the workhorse...

    http://www.rubbermaidforless.com/rub..._info-140.html
    Personally, I hate these garden cart styles. They tip and don't hold much at all.

    What I like are the wheelbarrow style, wooden fram, two wheels in front like this one from sears. I have bought it in the past at true value. Its an 8 cubic foot, if I could find a 10 cu foot I'd buy it:

    http://www.sears.com/ames-8-cubic-fo...SPM5693541803P

    Two wheels in this configuration is MUCH easier on your back - the wheelbarrow doesn't torque, and saves your back, arms and also the wheelbarrow doesn't twist out of shape and break and lasts longer. You can go around corners with a load without wrenching yourself - you can take largeer loads more easily. Honest, once you have one, you won't want a one wheel again, but it has to be like the link above, not a garden cart. The garden cart style is terrible in my opinion.
    Trainer's website - photos of my horse Airborne under About and Francesca Edwards also in media page 1

    http://www.patricianorciadressage.com/



  3. #43
    Join Date
    Mar. 27, 2009
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    2,243

    Default

    Then, this looks interesting, never seen this before

    http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_07180003000P
    Trainer's website - photos of my horse Airborne under About and Francesca Edwards also in media page 1

    http://www.patricianorciadressage.com/



  4. #44
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2007
    Location
    San Jose, Ca
    Posts
    5,563

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ambitious Kate View Post
    Then, this looks interesting, never seen this before

    http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_07180003000P
    I have one of theses - it has worked pretty hard for a number of years, but is now starting to fall apart.

    It does not hold as much as the large rubbermaid two wheeler - but is a good choice if you have to deal with deep mud (ahhh SO glad I have moved barns so I do not have to deal with mud any more!) - the 4 wheels distribute the weight better, and the fat tires deal well with soft going. The "dump truck" style dumping is nice as well.

    You do have to PULL it rather than push (and I prefer pushing) but it is a nice cart to have around.

    I use it for moving my tack trunk (when loaded up, that trunk is heavy!) and moving sacks of feed and hay bales.

    But for daily stall cleaning, I much prefer the large sized rubbermaid.



  5. #45
    Join Date
    Feb. 2, 2003
    Location
    Iowa, USA
    Posts
    2,594

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    I don't think a pull-style cart would work for me. (DH has always said I'm a pushy broad...) If you're trying to get up an incline or over a curb or something, seems like the only muscles you could really engage would be your quads. With a push style cart, you can use your arms and core muscles as well as legs.
    Lots of great links on this thread --Thanks OP for starting it. This has definitely inspired me to to upgrade my steel-tub one-wheeler with a plastic 2 wheeler.
    Try to break down crushing defeats into smaller, more manageable failures. It’s also helpful every now and then to stop, take stock of your situation, and really beat yourself up about it.The Onion



  6. #46
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Location
    Deep South
    Posts
    14,869

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ambitious Kate View Post
    Then, this looks interesting, never seen this before

    http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_07180003000P
    Those are very good for distributing small bale hay.
    ... _. ._ .._. .._



  7. #47
    Join Date
    Nov. 8, 2012
    Location
    gulf coast
    Posts
    1,065

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    My vote is for the rubbermaid with two wheels. For all the above reasons and when I hurt my shoulder I could still push it/ load it/ dump it/ with one arm in a sling.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #48
    Join Date
    Jan. 15, 2013
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    303

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    Quote Originally Posted by Equibrit View Post
    The best one I've ever had; http://www.ezhaulcart.com/home.php

    Got the solid tyres and the thing is still going strong with zero problems after 14 years.
    This! Best wheelbarrows I have used. Can cart really heavy loads no problem in them.

    I don't mind the Rubbermaid ones either but they break much more easily/often under regular heavy use.



  9. #49
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    42,503

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    Didn't read all the post, but consider that for much you do when on the road, a dolly is much better than a wheelbarrow.

    Both have their place, just think where one or the other are better.



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