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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb. 17, 2000
    Location
    Berlin, CT
    Posts
    4,018

    Default Scary moment with our cat, seizure???

    First off, yes we plan on calling the vet in the morning but in the meantime, looking for some advice here.

    Tonight our 16 yo cat started yowling, I looked up at him just in time to see him flop on his side. When I got to him, he seemed really out of it , no signs of convulsions. After about 30 seconds he seemed to come out of it and went back to his normal routine.

    Having worked EMS and as a 911 dispatcher, if this was a human I would immediately say seizure, do you think it is the same for cats?

    Cat is 16, has hyperthyroidism and is on meds for that. Had basic bloodwork and thyroid levels checked at Christmas and things were good then.
    "You are under arrest for operating your mouth under the influence of
    ignorance!" Officer Beck



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 25, 2011
    Posts
    401

    Default

    It does sound like a mild seizure. I would call the vet this morning.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 26, 2001
    Location
    Toronto, Canada.
    Posts
    6,340

    Default

    I would think one of three things. Syncopal episode (or cardiac event), seizure or a saddle thrombus. Saddle thrombuses are VERY painful (would explain the yowling) and usually if the cat can dislodge it quickly, they return to normal within minutes.

    The yowling doesnt really fit with a syncopal episode, and the laying of its side without any signs of twitching is not "common" of a seizure (but cant be ruled out).

    I would ensure your vet listens very carefull for a murmur - if there is one present a cardiac ultrasound to look for smoke or any clots vs. hyperthyroid murmur is warranted. Often low doses of heparin is enough to prevent prone cats to thrombosis. In events where a thombus cant be cleared within minutes, the prognisis is grave at best.

    Good luck wih your kitty!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 17, 2000
    Location
    Berlin, CT
    Posts
    4,018

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SquishTheBunny View Post
    I would think one of three things. Syncopal episode (or cardiac event), seizure or a saddle thrombus. Saddle thrombuses are VERY painful (would explain the yowling) and usually if the cat can dislodge it quickly, they return to normal within minutes.

    The yowling doesnt really fit with a syncopal episode, and the laying of its side without any signs of twitching is not "common" of a seizure (but cant be ruled out).

    I would ensure your vet listens very carefull for a murmur - if there is one present a cardiac ultrasound to look for smoke or any clots vs. hyperthyroid murmur is warranted. Often low doses of heparin is enough to prevent prone cats to thrombosis. In events where a thombus cant be cleared within minutes, the prognisis is grave at best.

    Good luck wih your kitty!
    Thank you for the suggestions Squish. Will try and get an appointment for him to get looked at as soon as possible.
    "You are under arrest for operating your mouth under the influence of
    ignorance!" Officer Beck



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 29, 2012
    Location
    La La Land
    Posts
    478

    Default

    sorry to hear about your poor kitty.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul. 26, 2001
    Location
    Toronto, Canada.
    Posts
    6,340

    Default

    Just another thought - ask for bloodwork, sometimes sudden glucose changes can cause strange behaviour. Its usually resolved with providing glucose supplimentation (like syrup, honey or food), they dont often become normal without it....but its worth checking out!



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb. 17, 2000
    Location
    Berlin, CT
    Posts
    4,018

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SquishTheBunny View Post
    Just another thought - ask for bloodwork, sometimes sudden glucose changes can cause strange behaviour. Its usually resolved with providing glucose supplimentation (like syrup, honey or food), they dont often become normal without it....but its worth checking out!
    That was one of the things we had checked in December and it was normal but can't hurt to have them check it again.
    "You are under arrest for operating your mouth under the influence of
    ignorance!" Officer Beck



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug. 12, 2010
    Location
    Westford, Massachusetts
    Posts
    3,585

    Default

    Our old female cat had a similar incident five or so years ago, at age 17ish. She seemed to suddenly "check out" like no one was home, was stumbling when she walked, drooled and made some weird crying noises. It was Sunday, but our vet agreed to meet me at the clinic and have a look at her. By the time we got there, she was behaving normally. He examined her, took some blood, etc... Nothing turned up. His feeling is that it was a transient ischemic attack...tiny little stroke, which he said is not uncommon in elderly cats. She never had another, seemed to recover fully from it with no lasting neuro deficits and lived five more years...we had her euthanized just this year, at age 22, due to a tumor in her jaw that was starting to make eating difficult.



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