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  1. #1
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    Jun. 16, 2011
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    Default Rescue prices!

    My husbands dog died of old age recently and he has gotten to the point where he is ready for another dog. We have just begun to look but I am astounded by the prices that rescues want you to pay.

    One I saw this morning was $500! I understand they have expenses and stuff but for that price I want a registered dog.

    Yes, we have also found the ones that are $85 which is more reasonable, especially for a spayed or neutered dog. We are willing to pay if for no other reason to show a commitment.

    Do people really pay these prices or it is a way of hoarding without seeming to do so?



  2. #2
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    Mar. 23, 2006
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    New York State
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    Most of the volunteer rescues around my area charge between $225. and $350. for dogs. The local humane societies are closer to the $75 to $100 range but they have more funding.

    The little Peke that I adopted years ago had an adoption fee of $275. and that didn't begin to cover the veterinary care that she had received. She was also in foster homes for several months.

    If you find a dog that you are interested in but see a high adoption fee you might ask about what veterinary treatments have been done. Sometimes it's a way for the organization to try to recoup some fees.

    I have no doubt that there are some hinky organizations that will deliberately try to overcharge too, so ask questions and do some research.

    There are always other dogs out there to adopt. If you have a City Pound that is a good place to start.


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  3. #3
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    Dec. 12, 2004
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    Massachusetts
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    Have you been to the vet recently and paid for a spay/neuter, a round of shots, worming, heartworm meds (my local shelter sends them off with a year's worth), the visit fee, etc?

    It was a while ago, but I'd say I spent close to $600 (each) getting my two most recent puppies up to date. The spay/neuter visit alone is usually $250-$300, plus two rounds of puppy shots, plus...
    Well isn't this dandy?


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  4. #4
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    Jul. 13, 2011
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    East Longmeadow, MA
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    At my vet's office they will give you a "puppy package" or "kitten package" - includes all shots, exams, de-worming, and speuter. I paid $400.00 and it covered everything for the kitten I got last year.

    That said, I have found that "rescues" will charge a lot more than a pound/shelter, and often more than they have spent on the animal. I agree it is worthwhile doing some research.
    What's wrong with you?? Your cheese done slid off its cracker?!?!


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  5. #5
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    Mar. 25, 2011
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    Pennsylvania
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    Rescues charge a fee to try to cover the costs of their animals. Your animal might have just needed a speuter, but another animal might come in needing surgery (for example). So instead of charging you $100 and someone else $1000, they charge everyone $300. These costs can vary from rescue to rescue, puppies are often more. There are some organizations that place very valuable animals whose fees will make you pass out. For example, there is one organization whose name escapes me at the moment, that places GSDs that didn't make the cut in assistance dog/therapy dog/seeing-eye dog training. They are still well-bred, sane, sound, highly valuable animals so you're going to still pay premium price for them.

    Pauila
    He is total garbage! Quick! Hide him on my trailer (Petstorejunkie).


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  6. #6
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    Nov. 2, 2001
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    Quote Originally Posted by paulaedwina View Post
    For example, there is one organization whose name escapes me at the moment, that places GSDs that didn't make the cut in assistance dog/therapy dog/seeing-eye dog training. They are still well-bred, sane, sound, highly valuable animals so you're going to still pay premium price for them.
    Pauila
    Seems misleading, these animals are highly trained, not in need of rescuing (unless those are the ones inapt people raised and made unsuitable...)

    I think it depends on the organization you are dealing with, of course, anything private, you want to vet accordingly.

    The way current prices are going, a couple hundred bucks are a bargain when the animal has had the basic vet care, including neutering.

    My 'free' kittens raked up quiet a vet bill in no time...It would have been a lot cheaper to grab a couple from the pound...
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  7. #7
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    Dec. 18, 2006
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    NY
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    Default

    Well, I do think $500 is probably pretty high for a rescue - are they working with specialty breeds or something? If so, I might be able to understand that price, especially if they have been transported to experienced foster homes and given special vet care.

    If not...that sounds pretty high for a rescue...are they very small? Or a start-up operations? In either case, I might look elsewhere just because of that...

    However, FWIW, for $500 you might be able to get a "registered" dog, but it is not necessarily (and actually unlikely) to be a well-bred, registered dog. Registration means absolutely nothing - just a piece of paper that lists the dog as "purebred", no matter how poor a specimen, or how unhealthy. A registered dog from a good breeder will probably cost more than that, PLUS the puppy shots/vet care, etc. for another $500ish on top of that just to start out.

    For a rescue, I would definitely be willing to pay a few hundred dollars - as the others have said $250-350 seems to be the average price range that covers vet care, shots, and sometimes training, fostering and transportation. Good rescues do good work!


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  8. #8
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    Feb. 11, 2011
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    We have a horse rescue in my state that has adoption fees often 2-3X market value.

    I get it costs to house/care pets and livestock, but these fees seem counterproductive to placing animals in homes at times. Why would I pay 2-3X market value and sign a contract with a rescue when I can spend much less and have free and clear title/ownership?

    Sure it feels good to help a rescue animal, but I also do not need to stabbing pain in my pocketbook either.

    I think "buyer beware" sorta applies here.



  9. #9
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    Jan. 25, 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alagirl View Post
    Seems misleading, these animals are highly trained, not in need of rescuing (unless those are the ones inapt people raised and made unsuitable...)

    I think it depends on the organization you are dealing with, of course, anything private, you want to vet accordingly.

    The way current prices are going, a couple hundred bucks are a bargain when the animal has had the basic vet care, including neutering.

    My 'free' kittens raked up quiet a vet bill in no time...It would have been a lot cheaper to grab a couple from the pound...
    Well, in any training program there will be individuals who, for whatever reason, don't make it - but it isn't anyone's fault.

    Most county and city shelters only do basic vet work and if an animal needs more it is either sent to a private rescue or euthanized. I had information from a breed rescue that charged 250 per dog but actual expenses ran to at least 600 per dog.
    Some people do pay the fees and part of it is probably a donation. If you don't want to, only look at the places with the lower fee. Remember that many private rescues take on animals that need tumors removed, heart worm treatment, major injury treatment, dental cleanings, etc.



  10. #10
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    Nov. 2, 2001
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    Quote Originally Posted by Casey09 View Post
    Well, in any training program there will be individuals who, for whatever reason, don't make it - but it isn't anyone's fault.
    I was unclear.
    There are some people out there I have been told who get a puppy to raise but don't adhere to the program, thus leaving the dog unsuited....those are probably not the well trained animals that flunk out legitimately from the program.
    My mom currently owns a Malinois that flunked out of police school. She was meant to breed, but well, then life happens and she now keeps my mom's zoo in check. A nice dog, well trained (if anybody were to bother with it...) just not a dog to be on the job.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by S1969 View Post
    Well, I do think $500 is probably pretty high for a rescue - are they working with specialty breeds or something? If so, I might be able to understand that price, especially if they have been transported to experienced foster homes and given special vet care.

    If not...that sounds pretty high for a rescue...are they very small? Or a start-up operations? In either case, I might look elsewhere just because of that...

    However, FWIW, for $500 you might be able to get a "registered" dog, but it is not necessarily (and actually unlikely) to be a well-bred, registered dog. Registration means absolutely nothing - just a piece of paper that lists the dog as "purebred", no matter how poor a specimen, or how unhealthy. A registered dog from a good breeder will probably cost more than that, PLUS the puppy shots/vet care, etc. for another $500ish on top of that just to start out.

    For a rescue, I would definitely be willing to pay a few hundred dollars - as the others have said $250-350 seems to be the average price range that covers vet care, shots, and sometimes training, fostering and transportation. Good rescues do good work!
    I agree. I paid more than 500 for a puppy from a breeder. He was up to date, but still needed puppy shots, a microchip, fecal tests and will be neutered , which will be expensive with all of the blood work, fluids, etc. The typical cost varies by breed.



  12. #12
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    Oct. 18, 2000
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    It's become a racket in many ways.
    Brothers and sisters, I bid you beware
    Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.
    -Rudyard Kipling


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  13. #13
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    Mar. 25, 2011
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    Pennsylvania
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    Indeed, the GSD washouts are well worth their price. This is no bargain alternative to finding a well-bred, sound, sane, pup, and then vetting and training it on your own. All this has been done and often it's just that the dog doesn't have enough of the right drive (for example) for the job. So consider what you'd pay for a well bred, healthy, sane GSD, add vetting and training and you'll come to the same figure.

    Paula
    He is total garbage! Quick! Hide him on my trailer (Petstorejunkie).



  14. #14
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    Mar. 29, 2006
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    When I was fostering, the foster homes paid for all the food for the dog. The rescue would often pay for veterinary expenses but sometimes I paid for that as well. And it was all worth it to have the rescue keep the money and keep rescuing dogs. We charged about $300/dog when I was doing this several years ago.
    The bottom line is that no rescue is making money and is often staffed by volunteers. Let me restate. No one was making any money in the rescue I worked with. There is always a needy dog who needs an extra surgery or special food or something else.


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  15. #15
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    Oct. 15, 2010
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    Agree with others, $500 seems a bit high from my experience adopting dogs from rescues. Is it a purebred puppy? I know several breed specific rescues use the high demand for puppies to fund surgeries, etc for older dogs that come through their doors. I believe we paid around $300 to adopt a purebred adult dalmatian from a breed specific rescue (this was 3 years ago).



  16. #16
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    Mar. 4, 2010
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    I recently fostered a dog for a rescue. The dog belonged to a coworker who was threatening to put her down because she was indifferently housetrained and yappy (a Shih tzu). I took the dog in to housetrain it while I was on vacation and the guy wouldn't take the dog back when my vacation was over. And the thing was, she never had an accident at my house.

    A friend who fosters for a rescue asked if they'd post her on their website. They agreed and charged $250 to the adoptive owner. They're going to pay for her shots to be updated and they're giving me the balance, because I incurred $800 in expenses when the dog was attacked by my Giant Schnauzer. I didn't expect anything from them, but they said since I did the work and incurred the expense, they were glad to help me out.

    That being said, it seems like a large percentage of rescue dogs here have heartworm, and treatment for that is not cheap. They charge an even fee for all the dogs and hope to break even eventually.

    StG



  17. #17
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    Dec. 2, 2002
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    Do some rescues need drastic overhauls of their adoption fee models? Absolutely. The idea of spending $500 for a mixed breed, healthy, adult dog that has been recently sprung from a shelter is absurd. Even if the money goes toward overhead for running the rescue, or toward the cost of helping other, sicker dogs that the rescue assists.

    That being said, there ARE rescues out there that are dedicated to bailing out large numbers of sick/injured dogs that would otherwise be euthanized in high-kill shelter situations. The overhead costs of treating these dogs is exorbitant. Add that to the fact that they also need to be transported from the shelters to foster homes, cared for in foster, and marketed to potential adopters, rescues need to cover their costs somehow.

    $500 is really steep for a rescue. Honestly, if a rescue finds they need to charge that much for an adoption fee, they should probably consider seeking funding in other forms because $500 can purchase a pretty decent pet (great shelter dog, plus a nice beginning to an emergency vet fund). But people complain about rescues charging $275- a dog that's undergone heartworm treatment or some type of surgical intervention is a bargain at that price.
    Here today, gone tomorrow...



  18. #18
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    Mar. 26, 2008
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    More appealing animals (cute, small breeds, young) need their adoption fees to pay for the less appealing animals (elderly, unattractive, needing medical attention). Most rescues around here have tiered pricing, where the young animals are the highest price and the oldest animals are extremely cheap or free. You aren't only paying to keep the lights on at their facility, you're paying for all the care they're providing for all animals.

    We have a shelter around here that has an INCREDIBLE amount of funding. It's almost a little sad because they're pricing out the other shelters. They adopt out a ridiculous amount of animals per day (it makes me curious about how stringent their adoption policies are too if people can just walk out the door with a new dog, but that's another topic) for incredibly low prices. On the one hand, it's great they're able to find so many animals new homes, but on the other hand, the imbalance of funding in the area makes people look at the other shelters as charging "too much".
    "Last time I picked your feet, you broke my toe!"



  19. #19
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    A lot of vets donate their services; they're not paid for the spays/neuters.

    Also, food/toys/kitty litter/beds/blankets - also donated by (literally) the ton from stores, companies, and individuals.

    Expenses of course are high, but the overcharging for adoption fees is creating a vicious circle. When it costs hundreds of dollars to adopt a pet from a humane society/pound/rescue, people don't get them from there, they get a pup from someone down the street or else they figure if I'm paying that much money I'll buy from a backyard breeder.

    They certainly shouldn't be free - studies show that they're treated with more value if they actually cost something, but I agree that it's gotten out of hand. Too expensive = people getting their pets elsewhere = more pets that are not adopted = more expenses for the caretakers = high adoption fees.


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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by FrenchFrytheEqHorse View Post
    That being said, there ARE rescues out there that are dedicated to bailing out large numbers of sick/injured dogs that would otherwise be euthanized in high-kill shelter situations. The overhead costs of treating these dogs is exorbitant. Add that to the fact that they also need to be transported from the shelters to foster homes, cared for in foster, and marketed to potential adopters, rescues need to cover their costs somehow.
    well, on the other hand they could just spring the healthy ones.
    Euthanasia is not the worst thing to end life.

    but springing the hard luck story dog is also part of the vicious cycle.
    You have the poster child on hand, you can just about bank for people to run your doors down, with cash in hand.

    on the other hand, the other dog would not require as many resources.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.


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