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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2001
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    15,232

    Default Weighting down a 150 gallon rubbermaid trough to keep from flipping

    Any suggestions for this trough?

    http://www.tractorsupply.com/stock-t...pacity-2229919

    I want to use it as a slow grazing feeder...I have 3 with holes drilled in them...I would like to tie down big half bale hay bags inside (to keep hay contained, holes allow draining).

    The problem is the troughs flip so easily.

    I tried adding a 35 lb dumbbell, but they can still flip them.

    Any success keeping these upright without tying them to something?

    Maybe a different type of weight? Or maybe it is impossible.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 28, 2002
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    East of Dog River
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    5,658

    Default

    Try driving rebar through your holes. Bend it into an L, drive them down and that should hold it.
    Founder of the Dyslexic Clique. Dyslexics of the world - UNTIE!!

    Member: Incredible Invisbles


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2011
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    Default

    Could you line the trough bottoms with cement blocks, or do you think they'd still be tippable?



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2007
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    Pen Argyl PA
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    Default

    sand bags?


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 17, 2006
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    Default

    Can you build a bit of a frame around it?
    “Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.”
    ¯ Oscar Wilde



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2006
    Location
    VA
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    11,372

    Default

    I'd build a frame--either wood or metal.

    Or, another option might be to use some twine or wire (but through pvc in exposed areas) and then tie those off to say the screw in type dog-chain lawn spikes directly beneath. But if the latter, very careful to make twine or wire covered and no loose loops that someone could hang up on.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...



  7. #7
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    Feb. 28, 2001
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    Default

    All great suggestions.

    I will start with cinder blocks as I have a few around the farm. Perhaps just raising it that much will stop the flipping since they won't be able to hook a leg inside.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2011
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LMH View Post
    All great suggestions.

    I will start with cinder blocks as I have a few around the farm. Perhaps just raising it that much will stop the flipping since they won't be able to hook a leg inside.
    Lol!! Sorry - my bad. I wasn't clear. Actually, I meant putting a layer of cement blocks INSIDE the trough to weight it down more. Not sure if raising it up will help. Empty, those troughs (I have a 150 & a 100) aren't all that heavy. They could probably be easily knocked over - no need to hook a leg inside.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug. 30, 2007
    Location
    Sunny Florida
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    744

    Default

    I will start with cinder blocks as I have a few around the farm. Perhaps just raising it that much will stop the flipping since they won't be able to hook a leg inside.
    Not so.... I have a tub just like that and put it up on cinder blocks and had one horse who would still get in it with both front legs to cool off in the summer. I suggest the rebar through the bottom ...
    "I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you..."



  10. #10
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    Feb. 28, 2001
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bacardi1 View Post
    Lol!! Sorry - my bad. I wasn't clear. Actually, I meant putting a layer of cement blocks INSIDE the trough to weight it down more. Not sure if raising it up will help. Empty, those troughs (I have a 150 & a 100) aren't all that heavy. They could probably be easily knocked over - no need to hook a leg inside.
    LOL! I actually thought of inside first but then thought of the loose hay always getting the blocks so I went with a 35lb dumbbell.

    Then I found an old thread talking about raising them on the blocks so my brain went that way.

    The darn things are just top heavy...

    I like the ribar idea-though an easier idea might be tent spike with screw eyes....but would it be a PITA to pull it out to clean the thing?

    Or I could just give up and try something else. I just hate buying something if this is an easy fix!



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov. 22, 2007
    Location
    Port Charlotte, FL
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    3,394

    Default

    Look for "Auger style earth anchors." They come in different lengths up to 5 feet long, but two of the short 2 foot augers screwed into the ground all the way below ground level and then secured to the tub with chain may be a good solution. I think they have them at Tractor Supply.

    I would not leave the loops on top of the augers exposed above ground level for safety reasons. You can fasten the chain to the tub using bolts with large "fender washers" to keep the bolts from pulling through the plastic.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct. 29, 1999
    Posts
    14,496

    Default

    I would not put heavy things inside of the trough that could be tipped out and break a leg. Also, the holes in some cinderblocks are an accident waiting to happen.

    You may be able to bolt it to a fence post.



  13. #13
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    Aug. 28, 2007
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    Triangle Area, NC
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    I know you're well on your way with this project, but have you identified why exactly the hay NEEDS to be in these bins?
    You could easily just put the slow feeder net hanging from a tree, tied to a post, or even just set on the ground (if you came up with a way to contain the strings). It's slow feed holes, so they aren't going to hook a hoof or anything.
    www.destinationconsensusequus.com
    chaque pas est fait ensemble



  14. #14
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    Feb. 28, 2001
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    Quote Originally Posted by Petstorejunkie View Post
    I know you're well on your way with this project, but have you identified why exactly the hay NEEDS to be in these bins?

    Well it doesn't NEED to be! LOL!

    You could easily just put the slow feeder net hanging from a tree, tied to a post, or even just set on the ground (if you came up with a way to contain the strings). It's slow feed holes, so they aren't going to hook a hoof or anything.
    I have tree hangers but was going to put out bigger slow feeders and did not want to have to lift them 'that high'

    The reason for ground containment is when it rains it gets muddy.

    Yes I can put up lower hooks for the feeders and will likely do that-I just had these 3 rubbermaid tubs with holes drilled in them and wanted to make use of them!



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr. 12, 2004
    Location
    new england
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    Default

    I use these for hay as well and it works great with very little waste. I drilled two holes in the the rim on one side and used that to secure the tub to a fence post with a small bungee, no more chasing the upside down tub around the paddock ... It has worked well this way for the past 7 years

    Before this my Irish draught gelding would flip the tubs all over the place when the hay ran out, he's clever and hasn't beaten this system yet
    Last edited by idtogo; Dec. 23, 2012 at 06:51 PM.


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  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb. 14, 2001
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    Lexington, KY--GO BIG BLUE!!
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    Another vote for tie to the fence. Unless you need 360* access, tying to the fence works fine. Those rubbermaid tubs actually have two tiny holes in the lip anyway, I've always threaded baling twine or wire through the holes and around a fence post. Works great for the horse who likes to use the tank as a swimming pool and dump it over! Twist the wire ends a time or two safely behind the post (away from eyes) and it's easy to fasten/unfasten to clean it.
    “A clever person solves a problem. A wise person avoids it.”
    ? Albert Einstein

    ~AJ~


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  17. #17
    Join Date
    Aug. 10, 2010
    Location
    Central KY
    Posts
    61

    Default

    We use the same exact water tanks as hay feeders, and tie them to a fence post as well. It's easy to untie it from the post to clean out. Ideally, it would have been nice to have 360 access, but this works great and keeps the hay out of the mud. Except for when they drag the hay out themselves to the ground, of course. :-)



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Feb. 25, 2012
    Location
    Montana
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    I have one horse who will flip almost anything and we wound up nailing the damn thing to a pallet. I use the one pictured here for a stock tank but a slightly smallerone for his feed. He CANNOT flip it and works fine EXCEPT much harder to dump, can freeze to the ground, and harder to clean when he doesn't finish. But the nailing to the pallet has at least slowed the "look mom I TOTALLY flipped all my dinner!! Where's more?" bit, glad to say.


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  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
    Location
    West Coast of Michigan
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    Default

    I have used prefab concrete footings for deck construction to weight down things that my one horse likes to use for frisbees. They weigh about 75 pounds and you can buy them at Lowe's or any bigger hardware store. They are sort of pyramid shaped so very difficult to tip.
    Click here before you buy.



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