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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct. 22, 2010
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    Colorado
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    Default Hunter Breeding Classes are they worth it?

    I just got the prize list for the Summer in Rockies. While I was flipping threw it, I saw the young hunter breeding classes & thought it may be fun to compete my hunter bred filly. However, after adding up the cost of everything involved for 1 or 2 classes per week.......All I can think is ouch that is a lot of $$$! In fact all the other hunter classes are $175 for the whole division or $40 by the class (granted you have to pay for a trainer but that's a whole other matter). I'm just talking show ground fees.

    I really just want her to get the mileage but in that case I'm wondering if it would be better to just trailer her up there to hang out for a day or two.

    So I'm wondering......Is it worth showing in these classes? If so, are you getting your money out and why are you doing it?
    Does Europe have these young in hand classes and if so how do they work?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 17, 2006
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    North Central Florida
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    Default

    I cannot speak to the hunter breeding classes, but, as they appear in your area, you might want to look into the Young Horse Show Series designed on a European model where youngsters can get experience, exposure and accolades. If there is not one in your area, you might want to explore hosting one.
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar. 3, 2008
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    110

    Default

    I find that the Hunter breeding classes are a great opportunity to get youngsters out and get them exposed to the show environment as well as continue education in ground manners. Definitely worth the $$ investment.



  4. #4
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    Oct. 2, 2007
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    Mirabel, QC
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    Default

    It depends on your goal.

    If you are in it for sales purposes, it might not be worth it in itself, especially if you can't show and win in the big shows.

    If you are in it for the experience, YES. Totally worth it!
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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr. 11, 2006
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
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    Default

    It's good experience for the babies for sure, but it is a lot of work, time and expense.

    I don't show in them often since breeding horses that succeed in "hunter breeding" classes is quite different from breeding for performance. Being successful in hunter breeding classes does not appear to correlate well with future hunter performance. It's also VERY subjective, far more subjective I find then a studbook inspection, or a show judged by a studbook inspection type judge or dressage judge.



  6. #6
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    Jan. 15, 2008
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    Chapel Hill and Southern Pines, North Carolina
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    Getting them off the farm ? Great idea! However agree with Vanderbrink ....I took mine to a western show where classes cost $5.00. It was all about experience
    "Her life was okay. Sometimes she wished she were sleeping with the right man instead of with her dog, but she never felt she was sleeping with the wrong dog."



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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 25, 2006
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    out west
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    I would have to say yes and no!

    I nominated my foal to IHF and those shows are once a year in California. (there is also an east coast and kentucky finals)

    I won quite a bit of money at those shows (not for IHF but the Sally B Wheeler Championships), but the ones that were dissapointing to me were the ones closest to my house. Only because they took a lot of money and time to do it with no good feedback. The California show is nice because it is a small vacation on the side, even though it is work to get them ready!

    I would love to have feedback. I mean, it was quite obvious that my horse isn't a classic plump HB horse, but he did hold his own and he learned a lot around the shows. He isn't used to a lot of horses because I have him at my house with 2 other horses and when I ride him he is alone.

    They don't give you any feedback on your horses conformation or type, so as far as giving you that kind of info, you won't get it. Thats one thing that I would like. I can see basic things, but when your horse doesn't win, its nice to know why not. (even though just like hunters it is always subjective!)

    Have fun and good luck with your baby!

    I have a new colt this year, and I plan on nominating him like his brother and trying to show. (thats if I don't sell him first!)



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr. 26, 2008
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    309

    Default

    IMO just taking them there to see everything is worth it, as far as the classes themselves I don't really thing it's worth it. To me taking them to the show, walking them around, taking them everywhere, waiting around is what it's all about. They don't really have to be in a class to get the experience. Or even taking them to a local show that has a presentation or model class or something of the sort would be way cheaper.



  9. #9
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    Jan. 17, 2010
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    Default

    Responding to Vendenbrink's comments, which have been discussed on COTH ad nauseum in many other posts, about youngsters who succeed in hunter breeding not going on to be performance stars, I finally have a brief example of sort of an answer:

    At HITS Culpeper this week Cameo Appearance was reserve champion in the First Year Greens, also winning many division ch. and res. in the First Year Greens at HITS Ocala this winter. Cameo Appearance, bred by the Sheffields of VA, was USEF Champion Yearling Hunter Breeding in '07. Also at HITS Culpeper on the same day this week, West Hampton was champion of the 3' Pregreens, one of his many performance championships to date. He was a very successful youngster on the line. In one of those 3' Pregreen classes, which West Hampton won, the 3rd place horse IamwhatIam was a BYH winner, and the 4th place horse Palomar was 4th in USEF national hunter breeding rankings as a yearling and 3rd nationally as a two year old. And that is just one morning this week.................

    I will say that many winning show hunters never attempted the hunter breeding divisions when they no doubt would have done quite well. More than a few of those were spending their youth in Europe.

    Diane Halpin & Laurel Leaf Hanoverians: Facebook



  10. #10
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    Sep. 14, 2000
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    Goochland, VA
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    In addition to Diane's comment, our Celtic Gold was champion at the same show in the 3'3" pre-greens. He also came up from the HB classes, as well as the IHF. We could not be more happy with his performance, manners and scope.

    There are many things to be gained from the actual show experience, starting with prep day, braiding, wearing a bridle, being trained to stand and be obedient, moving on command quietly, and so forth. If you can duplicate all these things and not actually go n a HB class, great! Go for it. But to just go wander around a show grounds and do nothing else does NOT give the same benefit as competing.
    Laurie
    Finding, preparing, showing and training young hunters, in hand and performance.
    www.juniorjohnsontrainingandsales.com



  11. #11
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    Jan. 17, 2010
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    Sorry, Laurie! Celtic Gold was champion that same morning this past week....... So that is sort of an answer just among the hunter breeding stars that I'm aware of!



  12. #12
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    Dec. 18, 2008
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    SE, PA
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    We have a great new organization here on the east coast - Keystone Performance Breeders that have both Hunter Breeding and Sport Horse divisions at the same show. The HB classes are USEF "C" and sport horse are KPB only. It's great to get them exposed to the sights & sounds, plus to get the feed back from the judges on their score cards.
    Our horses know our secrets; we braid our tears into their manes and whisper our hopes into their ears.


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  13. #13
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    Apr. 29, 2003
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    Hartford, Wi. 53027
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    I think it is a very good experience for young horses and great preparation for future showing careers. They learn while they are going away from home, they do go back, which is a big thing for a youngster. I can definately see the difference the the ones we did breeding with and the ones we did not. The ones we showed broke out super easy, stepped into their careers very easily. As long as they are prepared properly, it is super experience for them.

    Nancy
    Home of Ironman: GOV, BWP, RPSI, CSHA, AWR, ISR Oldenburg, CWHBA, CSHA, CS, and PHR.
    www.ironmanonline.com



  14. #14
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    Jan. 15, 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by nsm View Post
    I think it is a very good experience for young horses and great preparation for future showing careers. They learn while they are going away from home, they do go back, which is a big thing for a youngster. I can definately see the difference the the ones we did breeding with and the ones we did not. The ones we showed broke out super easy, stepped into their careers very easily. As long as they are prepared properly, it is super experience for them.

    Nancy
    Nancy - agree completely - my only point was that it doesn't have to be HB classes - mine were braided, cleaned up, in a stall, handled, stood in a class etc. Only for a fraction of the cost and the fact that a MINI beat my mare as most suitable for "hunters" at a QH show??? Added to the fun of the whole adventure We have a lot of these types of shows 30 minutes down the road not 5 hours - 10 hours away.

    And Keystone - great for you - again, geography is everything!
    "Her life was okay. Sometimes she wished she were sleeping with the right man instead of with her dog, but she never felt she was sleeping with the wrong dog."



    www.dontlookbackfarm.com



  15. #15
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    Nov. 25, 2007
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    Canada
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    Quote Originally Posted by dianehalpin View Post
    Responding to Vendenbrink's comments, which have been discussed on COTH ad nauseum in many other posts, about youngsters who succeed in hunter breeding not going on to be performance stars, I finally have a brief example of sort of an answer:

    At HITS Culpeper this week Cameo Appearance was reserve champion in the First Year Greens, also winning many division ch. and res. in the First Year Greens at HITS Ocala this winter. Cameo Appearance, bred by the Sheffields of VA, was USEF Champion Yearling Hunter Breeding in '07. Also at HITS Culpeper on the same day this week, West Hampton was champion of the 3' Pregreens, one of his many performance championships to date. He was a very successful youngster on the line. In one of those 3' Pregreen classes, which West Hampton won, the 3rd place horse IamwhatIam was a BYH winner, and the 4th place horse Palomar was 4th in USEF national hunter breeding rankings as a yearling and 3rd nationally as a two year old. And that is just one morning this week.................

    I will say that many winning show hunters never attempted the hunter breeding divisions when they no doubt would have done quite well. More than a few of those were spending their youth in Europe.

    Diane Halpin & Laurel Leaf Hanoverians: Facebook



  16. #16
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    Feb. 9, 2005
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    Upper Midwest
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3Dogs View Post
    Getting them off the farm ? Great idea! However agree with Vanderbrink ....I took mine to a western show where classes cost $5.00. It was all about experience
    I did the DSHB class with my yearling last year, but this year we are doing the local halter classes! I believe they are also $5. I am going to be woefully under-blinged I fear!!

    The only nice thing about the recognized show, and I assume this is true for most showing HB as well, is we did stay overnight at the showgrounds, so she got the full experience (i.e. having a stall at a show). We won't be staying overnight for the local stock shows, but she will learn what it is like to tie to a trailer while there is lots of small-child created chaos around her.
    Siouxland Sporthorses: http://slsfarm.blogspot.com/

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  17. #17
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    nope TTP - at the AQHA show? Stalled overnight and trust me, a whole LOT more to look at than at most HB shows
    "Her life was okay. Sometimes she wished she were sleeping with the right man instead of with her dog, but she never felt she was sleeping with the wrong dog."



    www.dontlookbackfarm.com



  18. #18

    Default

    I agree that the hunter breeding classes are well worth the investment. It teaches young horses about going in the ring, standing quitely (or not so quitely), exposure to show sights and sounds, etc. If your young horse does well it's icing on the cake!



  19. #19
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    Jul. 27, 2005
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    Chapel Hill, NC
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3Dogs View Post
    Nancy - agree completely - my only point was that it doesn't have to be HB classes - mine were braided, cleaned up, in a stall, handled, stood in a class etc. Only for a fraction of the cost and the fact that a MINI beat my mare as most suitable for "hunters" at a QH show??? Added to the fun of the whole adventure We have a lot of these types of shows 30 minutes down the road not 5 hours - 10 hours away.

    And Keystone - great for you - again, geography is everything!
    We do this too. Lots of local shows to get the young ones out and about to for just a few bucks. I also brought our weanling to all of the local 4 H clinics in the area. We have a lot of fun and they are close by which works great for us.
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  20. #20
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    Apr. 11, 2006
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    Ontario, Canada
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    Quote Originally Posted by dianehalpin View Post
    Responding to Vendenbrink's comments, which have been discussed on COTH ad nauseum in many other posts, about youngsters who succeed in hunter breeding not going on to be performance stars, I finally have a brief example of sort of an answer:

    At HITS Culpeper this week Cameo Appearance was reserve champion in the First Year Greens, also winning many division ch. and res. in the First Year Greens at HITS Ocala this winter. Cameo Appearance, bred by the Sheffields of VA, was USEF Champion Yearling Hunter Breeding in '07. Also at HITS Culpeper on the same day this week, West Hampton was champion of the 3' Pregreens, one of his many performance championships to date. He was a very successful youngster on the line. In one of those 3' Pregreen classes, which West Hampton won, the 3rd place horse IamwhatIam was a BYH winner, and the 4th place horse Palomar was 4th in USEF national hunter breeding rankings as a yearling and 3rd nationally as a two year old. And that is just one morning this week.................

    I will say that many winning show hunters never attempted the hunter breeding divisions when they no doubt would have done quite well. More than a few of those were spending their youth in Europe.

    Diane Halpin & Laurel Leaf Hanoverians: Facebook
    I realize there are plenty of examples of very good hunters that also performed well in hunter breeding classes. What I said was "Being successful in hunter breeding classes does not appear to correlate well with future hunter performance". A hunter wins a division over fences...not just by looking pretty..that's a fact. Most hunter breeding judges base their assessment mostly on correct conformation, the pretty factor, and a nice balanced package. They aren't assessing the horses on athleticim and aren't assessing the quality of the jump or even canter which would help. In my humble opinion you cannot pick a good hunter by just looking at him on the line.



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