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  1. #1

    Default Tell me the pros and cons of owning a farm near Ft. Worth Texas.

    Some land is flat and bare, some land has hills with scrub looking trees. Some farms are in the middle of nowhere. Some are in horse communities.

    Is it best to be on the north side of Ft.Worth area or the West or the South? Which area has the best schools...

    Just looking for a general opinion of where we should concentrate our search.



  2. #2
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    NO Idea, but it reminded me of a question I had:
    I flew into Dallas/ft Worth in November and from the air I noticed something curious.
    Some areas were nice and green, others looked like they had been dowsed in mud. Strangest thing ever.
    (but probably a point of interest when farm searching)
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  3. #3
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    Jan. 26, 2006
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    Fort Worth, Texas
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    We are sort of in the middle of the city .... five minutes to downtown Ft Worth

    Over by northeast mall.

    There are some large acre tracks here, we are on 2.5 acres and lease the adjoining 2.5 acres.

    The areas you have mentioned are all fast growth areas ... lots of new development.... an 8,000 acre project was recently been started on the west side of Ft Worth.

    As for the lay of the land....west of Ft Worth is geographically the beginning of the Great Plains (actual point of transition is western Dallas Co)... so expect flat elevating land.... trees are more like shrubs. The area has been prone to grass fires.... so if you build use a metal roof and make the barns either completely steel or cover the exteriors with a product like Hardieboard which is fire resistant

    Wildlife is everywhere. You will have problems with coyotes and maybe wild pigs... deer, bob cats, maybe the wild emu.



  4. #4
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    Jan. 26, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alagirl View Post
    NO Idea, but it reminded me of a question I had:
    I flew into Dallas/ft Worth in November and from the air I noticed something curious.
    Some areas were nice and green, others looked like they had been dowsed in mud. Strangest thing ever.


    The green areas are highly irrigated... this part of the world has been in an extended drought.... five, six years...really have lost count as to the number of years....


    I believe it was this laast Friday morning that we had power lines shorting out and burning because of fog.... the fog was being absorbed by the layers of dust on the cables causing the lines to go to dead shorts on the power poles


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
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    Mar. 17, 2003
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    North Texas, US
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    It kinda depends! How far out are you willing to go? Where are you coming from (and therefore used to)? Budget?

    There are two very different kinds of soils in North Texas...Black or clay gumbo and sandy loam. Sandy is much better for horses. The clay crap hardens into cement in the summer (or year round, the last few years with the drought) and you all but need an electric chisel to clean horse feet. Sandy soil will be more expensive.

    There are areas with more rolling hills, oak trees...pretty in other words! If you don't need to be close in for work or are willing to drive, I would look west near Weatherford. Some really pretty places out there and sandy soil. It's big time horse area...primarily cutting horse farms. Multiple world class vets/vet practices. You will pay more, though.

    North FW itself is pretty industrial, so not sure an area you want to be in.

    Another area you might want to consider, especially if being close to DFW is a consideration, is Argyle, Bartonville, Flower Mound. Again, good soil, very horsey (a lot of the h/j trainers in this area as well as eventers and dressage), good vets, good schools, affluent area...higher price tag.

    There are lots of horsey realtors in the DFW area. I would recommend using one of them.
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  6. #6
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    Jan. 26, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyriz's mom View Post
    North FW itself is pretty industrial, so not sure an area you want to be in.
    .
    Hate to tell you this but north Fort Worth is all the way up to those stated lands of gold ... north Fort Worth includes Allance and the Texas Motor Speedway

    Vets are not an issue as most all are set up for farm/ranch visits ...biggest issues now would be what kind of water restrictions would you be under and does the area have roads that have been upgraded from the old farm/ranch pathways



  7. #7
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    Apr. 18, 2010
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    Aubrey, Texas
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyriz's mom View Post
    It kinda depends! How far out are you willing to go? Where are you coming from (and therefore used to)? Budget?

    There are two very different kinds of soils in North Texas...Black or clay gumbo and sandy loam. Sandy is much better for horses. The clay crap hardens into cement in the summer (or year round, the last few years with the drought) and you all but need an electric chisel to clean horse feet. Sandy soil will be more expensive.

    There are areas with more rolling hills, oak trees...pretty in other words! If you don't need to be close in for work or are willing to drive, I would look west near Weatherford. Some really pretty places out there and sandy soil. It's big time horse area...primarily cutting horse farms. Multiple world class vets/vet practices. You will pay more, though.

    North FW itself is pretty industrial, so not sure an area you want to be in.

    Another area you might want to consider, especially if being close to DFW is a consideration, is Argyle, Bartonville, Flower Mound. Again, good soil, very horsey (a lot of the h/j trainers in this area as well as eventers and dressage), good vets, good schools, affluent area...higher price tag.

    There are lots of horsey realtors in the DFW area. I would recommend using one of them.
    With regard to the soil, some of the best in the world for horses is along a strip on 377 from Aubrey up to Whitesboro. It is the sandy soil that Cyriz's Mom is referring to, but along this strip especially, it's especially nice and acts as a natural cushioning to legs/feet.

    It's more expensive to live here, for sure, but it's also the reason we have a *HUGE* concentration of trainers here.

    Don't get into the black clay. That stuff is disgusting, and again - like rock pretty much year round.

    Fort Worth is great though, because there are so many events constantly being held at Will Rogers. You're within driving distance to Waco/Houston/Tyler/OKC without any of them being *too* bad of a haul.

    The two H/J barns I know out that way are Confederate Park Farm and Crying Coyote Farm.

    I don't know about the H/J clientele in Fort Worth -- from what I can tell it seems to be more of a western crowd with some eventers mixed in. The H/J clients are concentrated in Argyle/Flower Mound and then as you get up to Aubrey/Pilot Point it tends to be more breed show people.

    I'd be happy to help with any specific questions you have!
    Veni vidi vici. With a paint pony, nonetheless.



  8. #8
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    Apr. 2, 2006
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    I've noticed properties with "tanks" on the land. Strange alternate word for pond. I assume most of these places use water from the tank. How important is it to have a farm with a tank?



  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by back in the saddle View Post
    I've noticed properties with "tanks" on the land. Strange alternate word for pond. I assume most of these places use water from the tank. How important is it to have a farm with a tank?
    Natural lakes are something just are not a part of Texas, a tank is just a term for a pond.... and given the last few years unless the pond/tank/lake is very large it is not much help in providing water for livestock

    IF you are looking into an area that does not have city supplied water... you will be dependent upon a deep water well



  10. #10
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    Jan. 4, 2007
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    TX
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    Quote Originally Posted by back in the saddle View Post
    I've noticed properties with "tanks" on the land. Strange alternate word for pond. I assume most of these places use water from the tank. How important is it to have a farm with a tank?
    Dirt tanks are useless in a drought and in many locations you can't use them for livestock to water directly from them.

    You can pump water from them to storage tanks or directly to be used in small watering troughs.

    Just check with all kinds of water laws where you are.



  11. #11
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    ...also this area is the size of the state of Connecticut... so there are a lot of options



  12. #12
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    Dec. 20, 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by back in the saddle View Post
    I've noticed properties with "tanks" on the land. Strange alternate word for pond. I assume most of these places use water from the tank. How important is it to have a farm with a tank?
    lol, reminds me of when I first moved to Texas and was looking at small farms to buy. The realtor kept telling me about all of these "tanks" the properties had and I kept looking for metal water tanks. I had no clue that a tank was really a pond of some sort.

    I'm south of Fort Worth (Erath county) and we have that beautiful sandy soil that is wonderful for horses. A small section of our farm has yucky red clay but thankfully, not much. We have a tank but have never relied on it to water the animals. We do have two wells on the property and no water laws, yet, to deal with.



  13. #13
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    So tell me about water laws.



  14. #14
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    actually recently the Texas Supreme Court said you own the wate under your land just as any other meterial

    So if the water rights have not been sold off, you have your water
    Last edited by clanter; Dec. 9, 2012 at 02:07 PM.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by clanter View Post
    actually recently the Texas Supreme Court said you own the wate under your land just as any other meterial

    So if the water rights have not been sold off, you have your water
    The court didn't give a blank pass on that ownership, as where water conservation districts are in effect, you may be restricted as to how much you can use a well, depending on where the depth is, if Ogalalla water, or Santa Rosa, or what other very large formation it is tapping into.
    May not affect you unless you are going to use much, as in some commercial operations.

    You can find all that at the local court house.



  16. #16
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    For those that PM'd me, please clear your PM boxes, they are full.

    To find more about any land, elevation, water table, vegetation, etc. go to your local USDA offices and ask for maps and all that information.
    You may be able to find that online for each county you are interested in.



  17. #17
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    Oct. 9, 2012
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    Washington State
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    Quote Originally Posted by clanter View Post
    We are sort of in the middle of the city .... five minutes to downtown Ft Worth

    Over by northeast mall.

    There are some large acre tracks here, we are on 2.5 acres and lease the adjoining 2.5 acres.

    The areas you have mentioned are all fast growth areas ... lots of new development.... an 8,000 acre project was recently been started on the west side of Ft Worth.

    As for the lay of the land....west of Ft Worth is geographically the beginning of the Great Plains (actual point of transition is western Dallas Co)... so expect flat elevating land.... trees are more like shrubs. The area has been prone to grass fires.... so if you build use a metal roof and make the barns either completely steel or cover the exteriors with a product like Hardieboard which is fire resistant

    Wildlife is everywhere. You will have problems with coyotes and maybe wild pigs... deer, bob cats, maybe the wild emu.
    Wild emu?



  18. #18
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    Jan. 26, 2006
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    Fort Worth, Texas
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crackerdog View Post
    Wild emu?
    sure .... they have to be out there some where as most were turned loose

    jaguarundi are ....and are not supposed to be as they belong the brush country of
    extreme southern Texas along the Mexico border...here is a photo of a jaguarundi in our back field.... it is up next to the fence under the white fence tape

    http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b3...Picture047.jpg



  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by clanter View Post
    sure .... they have to be out there some where as most were turned loose

    jaguarundi are ....and are not supposed to be as they belong the brush country of
    extreme southern Texas along the Mexico border...here is a photo of a jaguarundi in our back field.... it is up next to the fence under the white fence tape

    http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b3...Picture047.jpg

    Cool!
    means that Wiki is wrong in a good way:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jaguarundi
    Assumed to be extinct in Texas.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  20. #20
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    Fort Worth, Texas
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    photo was taken at 2PM ... I was on a conference call... told the others to wait...ran out and took the photo from 300 feet .

    I had seen it several times before

    and there are the foxes.... that eat with the barn cats

    http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b3...Picture117.jpg

    http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b3...Picture126.jpg

    http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b3...Picture120.jpg

    this wouldn't be odd but out place is less than a mile from a two billion dollar shopping mall


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