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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec. 4, 2005
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    washington state
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    Question I've got a real little oinker problem :(

    My little yearling cat Edo is a pig. Like a HOG. Never a day in his life has he gone without but he acts as though each meal may be his last.

    He bolts and barfs his food. If he hears Tux (the other cat, 4, no eating issues) eat, he runs and starts wolfing down as much as he can (even if he has just eaten!). Tux just kind of ignores him but then Tux has never been piggy at all.

    He throws himself against the cabinets and my legs when he hears the cupboard open with the dental treats in it. He does the same with a can opener (tuna only, for some reason both cats will not touch wet/canned food-although Edo will act as though he hasn't eaten in 40 days until I put wet food down then turn his nose up at it). I have started reprimanding him when he throws himself in front of my legs walking or rubbing when he is begging.

    He's a yearling and he is getting portly. He is not growing much anymore, just a very round belly from oinking out 24/7.

    Any suggestions??
    The Knotted Pony

    Proud and upstanding member of the Snort and Blow Clique.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec. 11, 2006
    Location
    Cheesehead in Loudoun Co, VA
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    2,540

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    What type of food is he eating? My Daphne was a bolter/puker and Ella and Mitty were pukers until I figured out they couldn't eat kibble with corn, soy or wheat additives. Their hairballs are down tremendously, too.

    Daphne is also highly allergic to salmon. She will itch herself raw if she gets any. She's my most sensitive one. I had to give away an entire bag of Blue because she was so allergic to some ingredient. The other 3 just looked at it as though it were poison.

    Ella cannot have tuna and some brands of canned organic chicken for cats. My chicken is OK, though.

    Phoebe can eat anything. They can all eat the raw liver & kidney that comes in the giblet package.

    They now eat rabbit kibble and certain flavors of Fancy Feast (don't ask, all I care is that they don't puke them up!) They also get a human-grade probiotic (http://tinyurl.com/ccgae4p). Daphne 1/2 daily for her colitis and the others get 1/2 monthly. I tried Probios but that only made Daphne projectile vomit over the entire kitchen floor...

    So think about what you're feeding him and if that could be causing digestive issues.
    I'm not arguing, I'm just explaining why I'm right
    Violence doesn't end violence. It extends it. Break the cycle.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 2007
    Location
    Tampa Fl.
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    4,047

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    I would stop the canned tuna, the mercury in it will build up in their little bodies and cause problems down the road.


    my Tristan is a porker. LOVES to eat, will eat 24/7 if allowed. He gets 5 oz of grain free, all protein (chicken, duck turkey NO FISH) in the am and gets 1/4cup of kibble in the pm. Prior to his he got kibble twice a day. Adding a high fat, high protein quality wet food curved his eating habit. I noticed that when I have to feed a less quality brand can food (because I arrived at the pet store late) and I pick up something from petsupermarket, he does not get his fill from the same amount of food and will scream bloody murder for more food. The quality canned food will last all day (actually he does not finish the 5oz of quality food) and I will save it for his pm with his kibble.


    I feed him Earthborn Holistics.

    None of the fish varieties, only land animals



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec. 4, 2005
    Location
    washington state
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    Neither cat will eat canned food. I've run the gamut from Fancy Feast to the latest greatest from the vet. I have also rotated through about 8 different kinds of dry cat food, to no avail.

    Edo seems to have a behavioral issue, evidenced by his running to eat every time Tux goes to eat, it's competitive.

    His bolting occurs when Tux is also eating (competitive) or new food is put in the bowl (he wants to pork it down before anyone else).

    I am leaning towards trying one of those feeders that cause him to have to work for each kibble. I'm just wondering how Tux will like that.
    The Knotted Pony

    Proud and upstanding member of the Snort and Blow Clique.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 25, 2011
    Location
    So California
    Posts
    3,279

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    Have his thyroid checked. High thyroid (hyperthyroidism) is common in cats. Ravenous hunger can be one symptom. In the meantime, I would add give him more frequent meals.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec. 4, 2005
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    washington state
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    He is medically fine He was at the vet just last month.

    They have food available 24/7.
    The Knotted Pony

    Proud and upstanding member of the Snort and Blow Clique.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov. 19, 2003
    Location
    OZ
    Posts
    666

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    We have a food bolter-and-barfer too, and 7 other cats to boot. I simply have to keep an eye on Tyson--the piggie--and insure that he only gets about a third of his expected food at a time, constantly interrupting him when he begins stuffing, and refilling only when he has cleared the bowl and begun begging again.

    I've thought about putting it in a very small bowl that would require him to pull it out with a paw before eating...I have two cats who do this with the kibble whatever it is in. If I don't watch him and slow him down by constantly getting between his face and the bowl, Tyson seems to violently empty his tummy sometime within 5minutes of leaving the feeding corner.

    I feed Blue Buffalo and Grain Free kibble, mixed. Wet food is only a 'medium grade' Max Cat canned, but finances dictated a reduction in costs.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar. 4, 2004
    Location
    Louisville, KY
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    4,023

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    I would stop the free feeding and just feed 2-3 times a day on a set schedule. Free feeding is a guaranteed way to make a cat fat, especially if he loves to eat. Gradually switch to a really high quality grain free protein based food. Good ones I like are Earthborn Holistics, Orijen, Acana, Fromm, Wysong. Plenty of others out there, but they have had recalls and various quality issues.
    Caitlin
    *OMGiH I Loff my Mare* and *My Saddlebred Can Do Anything Your Horse Can Do*
    http://community.webshots.com/user/redmare01



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2011
    Posts
    520

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    I opened this thinking OMG someone else has a piggy in their kitchen I'm no help as I've never had a kitty do that, but I do have a real piggy in my kitchen. He had a rough start but is doing fine now. He CAN go out and be a pig. I just don't want him to.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov. 26, 2006
    Location
    Minnesota
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    709

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    Quote Originally Posted by twotrudoc View Post
    He is medically fine He was at the vet just last month.

    They have food available 24/7.
    Did you specifically ask the vet to check for this? A normal PE wouldn't show thyroid problems.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec. 4, 2005
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    washington state
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    Yes otherwise taking him to the vet would have nothing to do with the conversation

    The reason Edo is here is to be a companion to Tux, I work long hours. I'm going to get one of those "work for it" feeders and try that. I hate to make Tux do that but my little oinker needs to slow it down!
    The Knotted Pony

    Proud and upstanding member of the Snort and Blow Clique.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr. 1, 2008
    Posts
    4,558

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    Quote Originally Posted by twotrudoc View Post
    He bolts and barfs his food. If he hears Tux (the other cat, 4, no eating issues) eat, he runs and starts wolfing down as much as he can (even if he has just eaten!). Tux just kind of ignores him but then Tux has never been piggy at all.
    I'd feed him smaller amounts & feed him in a crate. I'd also start working him for his food a little too. Clicker training cats is not that difficult. Station training might be another thing you could use effectively.

    He throws himself against the cabinets and my legs when he hears the cupboard open with the dental treats in it. He does the same with a can opener (tuna only, for some reason both cats will not touch wet/canned food-although Edo will act as though he hasn't eaten in 40 days until I put wet food down then turn his nose up at it). I have started reprimanding him when he throws himself in front of my legs walking or rubbing when he is begging.
    so, what happens when he does the behavior you don't like? When you open the treat cupboard, what happens? Do you push him away and then open it? Behavior is dependent on consequences. If you don't like that, change what it means.

    suggestions: Go to cupboard/Edo throws himself at your legs = go in the living room and do something else for a count of 5. Repeat till the cat quits.

    suggestion: Go to cupboard = sit on your station for a treat.

    Because I live with multiple dogs and cats, I simply cannot have all of them around my feet in my tiny kitchen. When it's food time, the cats head to the station they get fed and they must either allow me to perform a behavior or they must perform a behavior before food is set down.

    Puzzle must allow me to run my hand over her head and back (she used to swipe at me in frustration or anger), Hazel must allow me to pick her up, stroke her and kiss her, Wisp must back off the food and sit.

    The dogs must stay back from the threshold into the dining room.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec. 4, 2005
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    washington state
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    Love it 3dog!!! I do have time at night to address.behavior for treats.
    The Knotted Pony

    Proud and upstanding member of the Snort and Blow Clique.



  14. #14
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    Feb. 1, 2008
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    Nowhere, Maryland
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    Sometimes just spreading dry food out (like on a cookie sheet) can slow a bolter down. I've never had a cat that did it, though, only dogs. My cats have lovely table manners, which unfortunately hasn't stop them getting fat. I did switch to a grain-free dry food which seems to help. They definitely eat less.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug. 18, 2003
    Location
    Davidsonville, MD
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    I used to have a cat that was like that. I found a "sensitive stomach" food that drastically reduced the barfing (my cats also had access to food 24/7 and were not at all fat). I don't remember what the food was, though. It was several years ago that I had him.
    Erin
    Dodon Farm - Home of Salute The Truth, Thoroughbred Stallion and on Facebook
    The Retired Racehorse Training Project, a 501(c)3 Non profit organization.



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