The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 39 of 39
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Aug. 12, 2010
    Location
    Westford, Massachusetts
    Posts
    3,378

    Default

    You may need a new tech, facility or a different type of machine (there are some now, specifically for dense breasts).

    I'm a dense DD and I have not experienced that kind of pain and problems afterward, something isn't right. It's not fun, but it's not something I dread.

    Don't stop getting mammograms!! Find someone who can make yours less miserable.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    May. 11, 2004
    Posts
    2,354

    Default

    I am short, and have tatas that if I an lucky are an A cup. Short and small are not the combo they thought of when they built the machines.
    When I have one that is when my Dr reads my record and reaizes I have not had one in while. I practice first by slaming my girls in my garage door for a week or two pior to get them desintized to the pain. then I stand on a milk crate and sqish them in something just high enough so they reach my face and jmp off the milk crate to siumlate standing n the floor, then I am ready for the test.
    I hate having them. In order to for me have the MRI or an ultra sound one I would have to go about 80 miles each way... and that with gas price the way they are is currently out of the question. So I when I "get caught" having not have had one in a while by my dr I ave one.
    @ nasselberry I know a person who seems to relish every one of her 17 million Dr. appts/procedures that she has managed to garner over the last 15+ years..
    Maybe this person you know loves being wth her family because of the Drs appts,and proceduers she had do enuder over last 15+ years instead of just dieing and leaving the family she loves. You ever think of that?
    Friend of bar .ka


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Apr. 29, 2005
    Location
    Paris, Kentucky
    Posts
    3,195

    Default

    Thank you all for your responses. My MIL is a breast cancer survivor, so I do not take this lightly. My GP has said that he will prescribe US instead as long as he can float it through my insurance. And whoever used the word DENSE, yes, that is how the tech described my girls too! No wonder it hurt so bad! And it wasn't that the pulling away from my body was so painful (not that it was pleasant), but the actual putting them in a vice until one (literally) popped! Before she snapped the picture she kept asking if I had implants! Dear God NO! Why would anyone in their right mind want to be big enough to give yourself back pain, shoulder pain and not see your feet for decades at a time???
    Holly
    www.ironhorsefrm.com
    Oldenburg foals and young prospects
    LIKE us on Facebook!



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2001
    Location
    Finally...back in civilization, more or less
    Posts
    11,436

    Default

    5 year breast cancer survivor here... and I work in radiology, so let me give you some additional information.

    Mammograms are (unfortunately) still somewhat operator dependent. In other words, the skill of the technologist makes a great deal of difference in the quality and comfort of the exam. If you have a bad experience one time, it does NOT mean that future exams will be similar. TELL the manager of the center if you have a bad experience and be an advocate for yourself - mammograms DO NOT HAVE TO BE PAINFUL. Uncomfortable, maybe... but definitely NOT painful.

    Repeat: MAMMOGRAMS DO NOT HAVE TO BE PAINFUL.


    (PS - timing your mammogram in terms of where you are in your cycle can also make a huge difference in comfort! ASK about that when you schedule the appointment!!)

    The equipment also matters. There are older, analog (actual film) devices, and newer, digital devices. The digital devices have been proven to be more accurate in women with dense breasts, and they also have software tools that allow the image to be enhanced so that the radiologist has an easier time reading the study, zooming in on areas that may be problematic, etc.

    You can find a list of FDA-certified facilities by plugging your zip code into this site: http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/script...fMQSA/mqsa.cfm

    Not all certified facilities have digital equipment, although they are becoming more and more common. You should ask whether or not the facility you are considering offers digital mammography... and a product called mammo pads. (Info here: http://www.mammopad.com/) That site also has a list of facilities that provide mammo pads... sometimes at a nominal additional cost. If you find mammograms painful or even just uncomfortable - try the mammo pads. They make a significant difference in comfort.

    Also... EVERY woman should know whether or not they have dense breasts. It makes a significant difference in the efficacy of screening for you, and also what other screening exams may be appropriate. You can find out more about this at a site called Are You Dense... http://www.areyoudense.org/

    About ultrasound, MRI, etc.

    Ultrasound is typically done as an addition to mammo screening, not a replacement. There are a couple of ultrasound products made specifically for breast screening; you can find info on the one that is most common - called SonoCine here: http://sonocine.com. That ultrasound screening is generally not (yet) covered by insurance, but there are efforts in many states to change this. In CT, where we pioneered that legislation, state law requires women to be advised of their breast density and mandates coverage for ultrasound where it is indicated (i.e., for women with dense breasts.) Several other states have followed suit... but many are still lagging behind.

    Breast MRI is another tool that is commonly used as a diagnostic tool, rather than as a screening mechanism. In other words, it's generally only used when other tests have uncovered a problem, OR if there are symptoms that were not explained by the other tests. In my case, for example, the cancer was in the ducts, and that is not something that normally shows up in an X-ray (mammogram.) A breast MRI requires contrast (dye) which is injected during the study and there are contraindications for that - so it is not something I would suggest anyone adopting as an "easy mammo replacement" option. It also produces a fair number of false positives (i.e., patients sent for biopsies when they are actually not needed.) You can find more information about breast MRI at http://www.radiologyinfo.org/en/info.cfm?pg=breastmr

    Remember that every technology has unique benefits as well as limitations; they are not generally interchangeable. X-rays are better for showing some structures, and they are still the gold standard for breast imaging. There is an increasing body of literature that suggests adding ultrasound to the screening process is also a valuable approach for women with dense breasts, but it has significant limitations:

    Ultrasound is very good for determining whether a lump in the breast is a cyst or a tumor. However, ultrasound cannot show microcalcifications - which are the most common indications of breast tumors. (That is why it is not a good replacement exam for mammography.) Ultrasound also has limitations in terms of how deep it can "see" into the breast so that the entire structure can be studied. It is also highly operator (technologist) dependent.

    The new automated whole breast ultrasound screening products are in their infancy, and show great promise... but no one has overcome the limitations about the types of structures (such as the microcalcifications) that it can identify.

    This is an area where you can take a lot of control over your own health and well being. Educate yourself about the options - because there are some, and this is an area of medicine that is evolving quickly. One of the latest technologies is called tomosynthesis - which creates a 3D image of the breast (but still requires compression.) It was developed at Mass General and there is a lot of excitement in the field about its ability to overcome some of the limitations of prior X-ray technology. It was only recently approved by the FDA, but more and more centers are adding it.
    **********
    We move pretty fast for some rabid garden snails.
    -PaulaEdwina


    5 members found this post helpful.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Location
    NorthEast
    Posts
    24,468

    Default

    I can't top LucassB's info except to hound again on the dense tissue issue. As long as your GP or GYN tells your insurance about your dense breasts, your ins will most likely okay the US. They's much rather pay a sount for US (they pay a mcuh discounted rate on those) than tens of thousands on cancer treatments since bc is not uncommon. I have dense breasts, A cup. I had a few mammo's before Gyn told them I was to have an US because they had to flatten them so much trying to see through the thicker tissue that I'd be black and blue from neck to stomach and even on my sides and back from stretched skin. And yes, it's a MUCH worse pain than the regular boob squishing if you have dense boobs. I'd *muvh* rather break a bone than have a mammo done. And come to find out the mammo's didn't show bupkis anyway...too dense. On US they found cysts that never showed on mammo. So definitely insist on an US because that painful mammo probably didn't show everything anyway
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Oct. 3, 2002
    Location
    Boogerville, USA
    Posts
    858

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bumknees View Post
    ... @ nasselberry I know a person who seems to relish every one of her 17 million Dr. appts/procedures that she has managed to garner over the last 15+ years..
    Maybe this person you know loves being wth her family because of the Drs appts,and proceduers she had do enuder over last 15+ years instead of just dieing and leaving the family she loves. You ever think of that?
    I think if such a person REALLY cared, they would have quit smoking 2 - 3 packs of cigarettes a day. And if they really cared about their family, they would NOT smoke in the house thereby forcing all family members to breathe their 2nd-hand smoke.



  7. #27
    Join Date
    May. 11, 2004
    Posts
    2,354

    Default

    you know the person not I.
    Friend of bar .ka



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Oct. 3, 2002
    Location
    Boogerville, USA
    Posts
    858

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bumknees View Post
    you know the person not I.
    I was puzzled as to why you responded to me, personally.



  9. #29
    Join Date
    May. 11, 2004
    Posts
    2,354

    Default

    Because you seemed oh I dont know to "resent" maybe thats not the right word even the person you know for surviving their medical problems when you choose not to.
    It just seemed odd to me.
    Friend of bar .ka


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Apr. 15, 2008
    Posts
    2,623

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lucassb View Post



    Ultrasound is typically done as an addition to mammo screening, not a replacement. There are a couple of ultrasound products made specifically for breast screening; you can find info on the one that is most common - called SonoCine here: http://sonocine.com. That ultrasound screening is generally not (yet) covered by insurance, but there are efforts in many states to change this. In CT, where we pioneered that legislation, state law requires women to be advised of their breast density and mandates coverage for ultrasound where it is indicated (i.e., for women with dense breasts.) Several other states have followed suit... but many are still lagging behind.

    FDA just approved another U/S system for dense girls a couple months ago:

    http://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsro.../ucm319867.htm



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Sep. 23, 2009
    Posts
    567

    Default

    My mom is now a four month survivor of breast cancer. The smallish lump was found during a ROUTINE mammogram. Due to her age and the chance of recurrance, she chose to have a double mastectomy. The type of tumor, and the lack of metastasis means she had surgery, but no chemo and no radiation.

    It seems to me that a couple of weeks of surgical pain is not a bad thing when it gives you YEARS of quality life.

    Find a different place to get a mammogram. Discuss with the tech what your previous issues were, and go get the darn thing. Mammograms save lives.



  12. #32
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2005
    Location
    Mass.
    Posts
    6,606

    Default

    You need to complain to the head of the mammography department. That was a BAD technician. You were INJURED. A mammogram can be uncomfortable, but it should NEVER cause what you are describing. I would write a VERY strong letter to the head of the radiology/mammography department, and copy your doctor. That is inexcusable.
    I realize that I'm generalizing here, but as is often the case when I generalize, I don't care. ~ Dave Barry



  13. #33
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Location
    Deep South
    Posts
    14,461

    Default

    ... _. ._ .._. .._



  14. #34
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 2005
    Location
    Spotsylvania, VA
    Posts
    12,702

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Canaqua View Post
    You may need a new tech, facility or a different type of machine (there are some now, specifically for dense breasts).

    I'm a dense DD and I have not experienced that kind of pain and problems afterward, something isn't right. It's not fun, but it's not something I dread.

    Don't stop getting mammograms!! Find someone who can make yours less miserable.
    This
    I wasn't always a Smurf
    Penmerryl's Sophie RIDSH
    "I ain't as good as I once was but I'm as good once as I ever was"
    The ignore list is my friend. It takes 2 to argue.



  15. #35
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2001
    Location
    Finally...back in civilization, more or less
    Posts
    11,436

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Equibrit View Post
    Tomosynthesis still requires compression. The difference from a standard mammogram is the presentation of the images to the radiologist.

    However, I'll say it again: COMPRESSION DOES NOT HAVE TO BE PAINFUL (and should not be.) Use mammo pads, and go to a center with qualified technologists... they are out there.
    **********
    We move pretty fast for some rabid garden snails.
    -PaulaEdwina



  16. #36
    Join Date
    Feb. 4, 2006
    Posts
    2,954

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by nasalberry View Post
    I am WAY older than you; and I've never had one; will never have one.
    Why? Because I have NO intention of being 'kept alive' only to be put on this drug, or that drug ... which will cause me to develop this condition, so I can be placed on that other drug. Ad infinitum.

    I have enough physical problems; I have NO intention on spending any more time with a Dr. than I must.
    I know a person who seems to relish every one of her 17 million Dr. appts/procedures that she has managed to garner over the last 15+ years.
    That is not for me.
    I've NO intention of spending the last 6 months of my life in chemo and/or worrying about cancer. If I should ever get it; well, we all must check-out of Hotel Earth one day: I'll be damned if I'm going to sully what's left of my stay here with that particular worry.
    Someone I was very close to passed away in July after a 5 year battle with breast cancer. She took that path after she went through chemo/radiation, went in remission and then it returned with a vengeance. It took a very, very long time to kill her. Probably six miserable months by my count, until her entire thoracic cavity was filled with fluid and tumors and she died. I believe she would still be here today if she had aggressively gone after it like the first time. Please don't put your family and friends through that.

    Please don't skip your mammograms. Find a new lab/tech, or see if you can do the ultrasound or MRI ones...it's so important to catch it early.



  17. #37
    Join Date
    May. 21, 2008
    Location
    Sonoma County, California
    Posts
    2,506

    Default

    I'm a DD and mammograms are not much fun for me. I am sore for a good 2 weeks afterward.

    Would way rather go through a mammogram than breast cancer. Any day. I lost a friend to breast cancer recently. It took over 10 years to finally kill her. Every time I suffer a mammogram I think of Nancy and how much she'd LOVE to be here, having her breasts squished, raising her teenagers.

    Don't skip your mammogram.
    Do talk to you doc about ways to avoid what you described.



  18. #38
    Join Date
    Dec. 21, 2008
    Location
    Longing to be where I once was.....
    Posts
    2,187

    Default

    I can tell you it is no less uncomfortable for us minimally endowed women. What you would go through having breast cancer would make your unfortunate experience pale in comparison. Talk it over with your doctor before the next one to see if there is something you can do to keep it from happening again.



  19. #39
    Join Date
    Mar. 3, 2010
    Posts
    1,414

    Default

    I had my first painful one a few weeks ago. I thought I would die! I have gained weight and have dense breasts. Not as bad as your experience, I mean I have never enjoyed them but this time WOWZA!

    I will need to be sedated next time I think. Same location but different tech.
    “Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one.”
    ― Albert Einstein



Similar Threads

  1. Who else is a heat wimp?
    By Hunter Mom in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 32
    Last Post: Sep. 3, 2010, 06:58 AM
  2. Replies: 10
    Last Post: Apr. 27, 2010, 12:06 PM
  3. Am I just a wimp or...
    By Sudi's Girl in forum Eventing
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: Dec. 27, 2008, 10:39 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •