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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr. 10, 2006
    Posts
    7,344

    Default Yeah, I'm clueless.

    So what piece of machinery/equipment can you not live without?

    If this helps at all: 120 acre property, 17 stalls, multiple pastures, two sand rings, indoor, two manicured grass fields for riding, loads of trails. Very hilly, very wooded. We also get a lot of snow here.

    Current owner is giving her tractor, mower, etc. to her son so we couldn't work that stuff into the deal. I'm assuming we need a tractor with enough HP to move roundbales. Various attachments for grading, plowing, etc.

    Buy new or used?

    Help.
    We couldn't all be cowboys, so some of us are clowns.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2012
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    4,899

    Default

    A Gator or other comparable all-terrain vehicle with a dump body. You will use it for checking fence, carrying things in the back, running from one location to another, feeding hay outside. We have a 4-wheeler with a little cart/trailer attached and that is something I would go crazy without!
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 30, 2005
    Location
    England
    Posts
    10,516

    Default

    I'd start with the best tractor you can afford and add things as you need them. I bought mine used for not very much money at a farm auction. Can't remember the specs off the top of my head though.

    A bale spike is handy to have if you're going to be dealing with lots of round bales.

    A good snowplow attatchement will be really useful for you- you'll never be trapped if you have one and know how to use it.
    Horse Show Names Free name website with over 6200 names. Want to add? PM me!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr. 10, 2006
    Posts
    7,344

    Default

    Oooh a gator, good idea.

    Kooki I too thought, best tractor we can buy... glad that seems to make sense.

    My biggest fear is getting in there and having some emergency that requires some piece of equipment/machinery that we have "forgotten" about and do not have... lol.
    We couldn't all be cowboys, so some of us are clowns.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 4, 2003
    Location
    Dallas, Georgia
    Posts
    16,574

    Default

    Yup, tractor .... and go for the front-end loader right off.

    I am also a HUGE fan of the Rubbermaid Big Wheel Carts. Ours is 7 years old and still going strong. We have used it for everything from manure removal, to moving cinder blocks, to using it as a giant hand truck for a tack closet, a hay rack & stall mats. It's so easy to maneuver since you can push or pull it. Turns on a dime. Soooo worth the investment.
    <>< Sorrow Looks Back. Worry Looks Around. Faith Looks Up! -- "When they try to tell you these are your Golden years, don't believe 'em.... It's rust."



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 17, 2008
    Location
    Dutchess County, New York
    Posts
    4,044

    Default

    Brush (bush?) hog for mowing, in addition to the tractor. Harrow for breaking up the manure in the fields (well, depending on how your pastures are set up). I'm also happy I bought an auger with which to dig fence post holes. It is not used all the time, but every time it is I am very grateful!

    Automatic waterers in the fields.

    Depending on what you are doing with your manure, a manure-spreader.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec. 21, 2008
    Location
    Longing to be where I once was.....
    Posts
    2,190

    Default

    Tractor with a front end loader, bush hog mower,bale spear, harrow, blade for snow plowing. All these you can buy used, although some aren't that expensive new. Make sure your tractor has enough power to do what you need ( a little bigger is usually a good idea). If you have the fields a manure spreader is wonderful ( our next must have). A big wheel barrow or cart is always a must.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar. 28, 2006
    Posts
    53

    Default

    Hey, did you buy sprucelands? If youre ever in trouble or need anything, give us a call.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr. 1, 2003
    Location
    Cocoa, Fla
    Posts
    4,073

    Default

    Agree with the tractor - the bigger the better with front end loader a must.

    We were told for our Ky farm that a mower where you can mow "off to the side" of the tractor - e.g. tractor on driveway and mower hanging off side of driveway - is great for steep hills.
    Sandy in Fla.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug. 14, 2000
    Location
    Clarksdale, MS--the golden buckle on the cotton belt
    Posts
    18,365

    Default

    Make sure you get at least a utility tractor. You want one that weighs at least 3 or 4 tons or more. Anything between 50 and 75 hp ought to be enough. I'd prefer the R1 tires (commercial/industrial ) rather than ag tires. 4WD or MFWD would be good, but I think you'd want to newer tractor for that. DO NOT buy a tractor without a front end loader or budget an additional 3500 to have one added. Couple of hydraulic links would be helpful.

    You'll probably want, in addition to the equipment that has been listed, a fertilizer spreader for many different things (overseeding, liming, etc.) and a boomless spray rig for herbicides and other liquids. You can get the latter that work with Gators or other UTVs. A GPS for spraying can save you money and damage by reducing overspray. A wick bar for weeds that need Roundup for control is very useful.
    "I'm a lumberjack, and I'm okay."
    Thread killer Extraordinaire



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 13, 2005
    Location
    Columbus, OH
    Posts
    6,801

    Default

    I'm sure you've thought of this already, but I'd just ask the previous owner what she had. Like, specifically which tractor, at what horsepower, and which attachments she had for it, etc. Also, ditto the advice to put your money first and foremost into an awesome tractor.

    Given the snow issue, you might also spend some time thinking about infrastructure for keeping diesel engines tickin'. I'm guessing your property already has infrastructure for fuel storage, like propane/gas/diesel, but if not that's something to think about.

    Not to sound morbid, but think about how you'll move the bodies of horses who have passed. I think that's something a lot of folks don't think about until it actually happens, but on a farm of that size, it's bound to happen.

    My trainer runs a MUCH smaller farm, more like 30 acres, but here's the equipment that gets pulled out regularly:

    The "big" tractor which is big enough to move round bales, bush hog/mow, pull stuck vehicles out of the mud, snow plowing, etc.

    The "little" tractor, which mostly stays attached to the manure spreader but is also used to drag the arenas. If you're hoping to drive the manure spreader down the barn aisle, measure the smallest door/aisle and account for it!

    The riding mower, for mowing that's too precise for the big tractor.

    The pickup truck, used primarily for hauling but also for light-duty moving-around-of-stuff.

    The flatbed truck, which gets trotted out for moving huge amounts of heavy crap: tons of jump poles/standards, setting up a dressage arena for a show or what-have-you. For bonus points, get a flatbed with attachable side gates so you can use it to hold cleared brush, etc.

    The golf cart and ATVs, used mostly to move people around.

    Other equipment you'll want to think about: chainsaws and other trail-blazing or ground-clearing equipment. One of the most popular pieces of equipment on my trainer's farm is the Chainsaw on a Stick. The blade is only about 16" long but it's on this big stick so that you can reach well above your head. Perfect for making head clearance in an area with overhanging branches (although of course, you want to account for how badly the branches droop when it rains or snows )
    ________________________
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  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug. 14, 2000
    Location
    Rochester,NY,USA
    Posts
    7,323

    Default

    Congratulations! I'm guessing you did buy the farm you wanted. Way to go. Yes to buying used but not abused. You're probably too far away to deal with the guys I got my tractorwith enclosed cab/bucket/snowblower. But I can tell you slightly used is the way to go. Keep your eye on any equipment sales/auctions.

    I think the others have given you good advice on what to get. You just have to decide in what order -that is AFTER the tractor and bucket. Heck, if you're willing, you can move snow with just the bucket but a blade is much easier, especially since we'll be getting that white stuff pretty soon.

    Lightly used if you can find it, is such a good buy. I bought my above mentioned tractor etc when it had 32 hrs on it. I paid ~$16K 4 yrs ago and the price new now is $22K.

    So tell us your plans. I don't get over to Off Course all that often so I didn't know the deal went through. Have you closed yet? If you have, have you moved yet? Have you sold your existing home yet? See, all kinds of information is needed.
    Sue
    Back in my day, we didn't have as many warning labels because people weren't so dang stupid!



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul. 5, 2007
    Location
    Beside Myself ~ Western NY
    Posts
    6,409

    Default

    Hands down: Front End Loader.

    You can use it for manure, snow, hay... you name it.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr. 10, 2006
    Posts
    7,344

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by makemelaugh View Post
    Hey, did you buy sprucelands? If youre ever in trouble or need anything, give us a call.
    In the process....

    Are you guys nearby??
    We couldn't all be cowboys, so some of us are clowns.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr. 10, 2006
    Posts
    7,344

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by msj View Post

    So tell us your plans. I don't get over to Off Course all that often so I didn't know the deal went through. Have you closed yet? If you have, have you moved yet? Have you sold your existing home yet? See, all kinds of information is needed.
    Don't worry you didn't miss anything, we haven't said too much, and still have a few more hurdles to jump through and details to work out... but it seems to be ticking along. The property has been a summer camp for the last 70 years or something... we will continue as such. My husband was the director at a competing camp for about 8 years, that is where he and I met, as he ran the business and I ran the barn. We've always wanted to buy a camp and the opportunity arose... so here we are.

    My mom is most likely purchasing our current home, and we will move out there.

    We are pretty psyched, but like I said, still lots of details to work out before we officially close.....
    We couldn't all be cowboys, so some of us are clowns.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2006
    Posts
    1,911

    Default

    Absolutely a tractor (you could buy used but they require a lot of $$ in repairs, maybe buy a new one with a warranty? DH is extremely handy but there is still a ton of maintenence), you will probably want a pretty big one for your size property. Then come the attachments... you will NEED a Bush hog, and a snow blower. You have to have everything clear for you, boarders, and deliveries. Our ATV has a plow but snow blower attachment is way nicer. You can get those attachments on craigslist pretty cheaply.

    We have a Polaris, absolutely love it. Before that I made do with a riding lawn mower so it can be done but the Polaris is heated (love it!) and can do a lot more and go over more difficult terrain (we have a lot of hilly land and a big valley). It is not IMO a must but it makes life way easier, my friend uses a 4 wheeler and has no problems. You will need at least a section of chain link fence to drag your rings.

    Wish list item? Skidloader. Love ours, it is a big help for clearing things and moving branches etc in the bucket. It can do some snow clearing worst case scenario.

    So excited for you FG!? Also a suggestion, I had someone cut hay for me this year... saved me tons of money. I would suggest it if you have any pastures or fields that are good candidates.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Aug. 14, 2000
    Location
    Rochester,NY,USA
    Posts
    7,323

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FlashGordon View Post
    Don't worry you didn't miss anything, we haven't said too much, and still have a few more hurdles to jump through and details to work out... but it seems to be ticking along. The property has been a summer camp for the last 70 years or something... we will continue as such. My husband was the director at a competing camp for about 8 years, that is where he and I met. We've always wanted to buy a camp and the opportunity arose... so here we are.

    My mom is most likely purchasing our current home, and we will move out there.

    We are pretty psyched, but like I said, still lots of details to work out before we officially close.....
    I hope those hurdles are easy ones and you and hubby can make it through them without any problems. Great that your Mom will buy your current home. That alone makes life so much easier.

    I think my girlfriend went to Sprucelands when she was a kid. I'll email her and see.

    I just wish you the bestest of luck. May your dreams come true. :
    Sue
    Back in my day, we didn't have as many warning labels because people weren't so dang stupid!



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Apr. 10, 2006
    Posts
    7,344

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by msj View Post
    I hope those hurdles are easy ones and you and hubby can make it through them without any problems. Great that your Mom will buy your current home. That alone makes life so much easier.

    I think my girlfriend went to Sprucelands when she was a kid. I'll email her and see.

    I just wish you the bestest of luck. May your dreams come true. :
    Aw thanks MSJ. One of these days, you and I will actually meet!!

    Just the standard hurdles, I think (hope) things will wrap up just fine. The property is amazingly beautiful, I'm pretty excited about that.
    We couldn't all be cowboys, so some of us are clowns.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Apr. 10, 2006
    Posts
    7,344

    Default

    PS I am totally printing out this whole thread.... tons of great suggestions and ideas.
    We couldn't all be cowboys, so some of us are clowns.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Apr. 10, 2006
    Posts
    7,344

    Default

    Duh, makemelaugh.... figured it out... we will be neighbors, hopefully!

    You guys have lovely horses.
    We couldn't all be cowboys, so some of us are clowns.



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