The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 59
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 20, 2000
    Location
    Whistler, BC
    Posts
    2,974

    Default

    While I was riding last night, there was another rider on a horse who was having difficulties going down a line in the hunter ring. The horse did not want to jump the second fence, so would stop and then duck out to the side, but as soon as the rider put her legs on to send the horse forward, it would rear up. The first time it wasn't so bad - more like little hops, but on the two more subsequent attempts the rearing got very dangerous and high up off the ground.

    The girl riding him (who I should mentioned is a competent rider, and known for being patient with young horses etc.) made a point of going with the horse as he went up, and not pulling on the reins, and then trying to send him forward once he landed. Despite her patience and attempts to stop the rearing, the horse proceeded to rear again, and this time the girl gave him a good crack between the ears with the end of her crop just as he was leaving the ground - interestingly enough it worked, and obviously got the message across as the horse stopped. I have heard many people say never hit the horse over the poll when it rears, and then some say that that is what you should do.

    This whole episode made me realize that I really don't know what the correct method is in dealing with a horse that rears. Aside from not pulling back and staying with the horse.

    So, what should you do if your horse rears, and what do you do to stop it if the horse continues to do so?
    You Strike Me Still



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun. 20, 2000
    Location
    Whistler, BC
    Posts
    2,974

    Default

    While I was riding last night, there was another rider on a horse who was having difficulties going down a line in the hunter ring. The horse did not want to jump the second fence, so would stop and then duck out to the side, but as soon as the rider put her legs on to send the horse forward, it would rear up. The first time it wasn't so bad - more like little hops, but on the two more subsequent attempts the rearing got very dangerous and high up off the ground.

    The girl riding him (who I should mentioned is a competent rider, and known for being patient with young horses etc.) made a point of going with the horse as he went up, and not pulling on the reins, and then trying to send him forward once he landed. Despite her patience and attempts to stop the rearing, the horse proceeded to rear again, and this time the girl gave him a good crack between the ears with the end of her crop just as he was leaving the ground - interestingly enough it worked, and obviously got the message across as the horse stopped. I have heard many people say never hit the horse over the poll when it rears, and then some say that that is what you should do.

    This whole episode made me realize that I really don't know what the correct method is in dealing with a horse that rears. Aside from not pulling back and staying with the horse.

    So, what should you do if your horse rears, and what do you do to stop it if the horse continues to do so?
    You Strike Me Still



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb. 25, 2000
    Location
    New York, NY, USA
    Posts
    3,695

    Default

    I've been told the crack on the poll with a stick is effective. I've also heard some say that if the horse is a rearer, carry an egg with you and when the horse goes up, crack the egg over their poll. Never seen it done, but I have it on good authority that it works.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr. 9, 2001
    Posts
    87

    Default

    Put draw reins between their legs, when they start acting up pull on the Draw reins and they canrt pull themselves up into a rear. Thats whay my friend does and her horses hasnt reared since.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun. 30, 2000
    Location
    The Confederacy
    Posts
    5,066

    Default

    For real Jair, email Colin...she helped me solve my horse's rearing problem. Her and DMK both...I am dead serious, ask them.

    What worked for me was, As soon as I thought that he may even be thinking of rearing...I dug my left spur into him and pinned his head to my knee and made him do some tight circles for a while (to let him think about what he had done LOL). This worked like a gem and he rarely think about being dumb...knock on wood.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct. 30, 1999
    Posts
    1,804

    Default

    like the rider had it under control.

    Based on your description - she knew full well how to handle the situation. You gotta have some skill to be able to stay on and crack a rearer over the head.

    My approach is to try and prevent the rear IF you think it's coming by keeping their hind feet moving. Or get OFF. LOL!

    I disagree about the draw reins suggestion given the rider was jumping. Also draw reins can incite a horse to rear if not used correctly.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct. 8, 1999
    Posts
    1,303

    Default

    I would advise against using draw reins unless you are incredibly competent and even then I would say not to. If the horse has draw reins on and does try to rear they will lose their balance very easily and flip...
    I have been fortunate enough to not have a horse who really rears(like what I beleive Jair was talking about, not just come up halfway)...I have always been taught to send them forward but I think that that is not always practical, sounds like this girl handled it about as well as anyone else would have. If I were in her position i would not hesistate to pop the horse on the poll with the whip.
    Rearing is one of the most dnagerous habits in my opinion. I have also heard the water balloon trick(but you also must be very skilled)...of course this is assuming it is not a pain, tack, rider problem

    "There are times when you can trust a horse, time when you can't, and times when you have to."



  8. #8
    Join Date
    May. 17, 2000
    Location
    Where am I and what am I doing in this handbasket?
    Posts
    23,443

    Default

    There are pros and cons to most things people have suggested, but a lot of it comes down to knowing the horse you are on, and being good at reading the situation. The first and foremost thing to do is KNOW that you must get the horse's feet moving. Rearing is usually just a really nasty way of saying "I WON'T GO FORWARD", but it can be "I'm really, really scared..."

    With that in mind, my first plan of attack is to take the decision out of the horse's hands (or feet as the case may be!). If a horse starts to rear, I whip his head around to my knee and move his hind end off with my leg (kindly or with great vigor, depending on how entrenched and nasty the rear behavior might be). This serves two purposes: First, he is moving his feet and it is MY idea; second, a horse with his head to your knee can't rear. We circle a few times like this, then I ask for FORWARD again. If the rear repeats, we repeat circling behavior with more vigor, for lack of a better word, and so on until FORWARD is achieved.

    Eventually the horse will get tired of staggering around in a circle and decide that forward is easier than rearing or circling. And I won't hesitate to use lots of voice and stick along with my leg if he insists on repeating the behavior. Rearing is nasty stuff and needs an appropriate response! And of course when they do go forward, that is no time to get picky about what speed or frame - reward forward even if it is the most pissed of spine jarring trot you have ever sat on.

    After you know the horse, you can generally catch the rear before they even commit to it which is safer for all concerned.

    If you REALLY know your horse, you might know he is the kind that will tolerate being whacked between the ears, and decide that a whacking is not worth the pleasure of a rear. I don't particularly object to the hitting between the ears - I am no fan of rearing, and if it works on a particular horse, then more power to the person. What I am most concerned with is taking a willful horse with a bad behavior and turning him into a scared, defensive horse who flips over on said rider. That's where the "know your horse" part comes in real handy.

    When they are rearing, you do want to try to not overbalance them, hence the more forward seat with a following hand. That is just good riding and a strong dose of self-preservation!
    Definition of "Horse": a 4 legged mammal looking for an inconvenient place and expensive way to die. Any day they choose not to execute the Master Plan is just more time to perfect it. Be Very Afraid.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan. 19, 2001
    Location
    MT
    Posts
    2,497

    Default

    My trainer did the egg thing on my pony mare - after we had ruled out physical pain, tack, rider error, etc. At first it was just those baby hops, but she went up with me several times pretty high - nothing close to flipping over, but enough to be quite dangerous. My trainer got on, and when she went up (really up), she cracked her over the head with a raw egg. She came right down & never did it again.

    I still remember her shocked expression, with raw egg all over the top of her head.

    Sounds crazy, but it worked on an ultra-b*tchy, VERY tempermental mare. I've heard other "success" stories with this method too - the pony mare I had was a little whipshy, and I don't think whacking her over her head would have quite the same effect.

    -Albion



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec. 8, 2000
    Location
    Ottawa,ON,Canada
    Posts
    1,033

    Default

    I've sat on a few bad rearers, and I do both the whip between the ears thing, and the tiny little circle thing. Both work well! [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif[/img]



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar. 6, 2000
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    1,551

    Default

    I'm not a big fan of cracking the horse between the ears for ANY reason, but I do understand that it works. I think I'd prefer the tight circles, but that's just me.

    I've fortunately not had to deal with this so far, but a friend has been training a chronic rearer. He got her to stop by carrying a floppy hat with him. When the mare went to rear, he waved it by her eye and shoved her forward. It worked, she hasn't reared anytime lately as far as I know.

    *Nylar*
    http://www.geocities.com/dunnbypicasso/



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2001
    Location
    Finally...back in civilization, more or less
    Posts
    11,545

    Default

    is such a nasty habit - the ultimate rejection of the rider's aids. It is not just no, I won't go forward... it is HELL NO I WON'T GO FORWARD, the worst of all possible sins.

    Cracking the horse a good one between the ears, in my opinion, is not a bad response - many horses are cured after one such experience, having become convinced that there is some mysterious monster lurking "up there" ready to inflict a good whack... ditto the use of eggs, water balloons etc (the theory is that the horse thinks the water, gooey egg etc is really his BLOOD) but both are tough to do unless you have an absolutely independent seat, hand and leg. It is quite easy to overbalance a rearer when you are lifting your hand/arm etc to deliver the punishment.

    For that reason, I am in favor of the turning in circles method- preferably as the horse is going up, before he gets up too high - but I have used all three methods and have found them all to work about the same.
    **********
    We move pretty fast for some rabid garden snails.
    -PaulaEdwina



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan. 23, 2000
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    1,648

    Default

    related to our assessment of the entire picture - that my horse hadn't been started correctly and had no respect for his people. So first, in the round pen, we established respect. Then, we had a running martingale on, for additional leverage (he's big and strong), and I did the head to knee thing, with lots of kicking, yelling and some dressage whip. We kept circling till he stopped, then I made him go forward. After about three half-hearted attempts (after the round pen, only the first was really high and scary), he has quit and hasn't gone up for at least a month! [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif[/img] [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif[/img]

    I think one of the most important things is that now I feel that I can control him if he is stupid. That is, in my conscious mind. My subconscious is still quite nervous.

    My trainer mentioned the egg thing, but I am not convinced that I am coordinated enough to do that while a horse is rearing - same with hitting with a crop.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan. 30, 2001
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    182

    Default

    i read a book by a british, english version of monty roberts, though i forget his name... he said that usually rearing is a pain/fear response and stressed not to punish it 'til you know that's not the cause. then he says you should smack your horse's belly, since that's his most vulnerable spot when he rears. it teaches the horse that when he's trying to assert dominance over you he's not going to be successful. accordign to this guy, you can do it from the saddle, and it prevents the horse from associating pain with the rider. i would think it would be okay from the ground, but more difficult from the saddle. anyway, never tried it, it's just another idea.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan. 12, 2000
    Location
    southampton,ny
    Posts
    2,348

    Default

    agree with DMK it is a refusal to go forward .Do not use draw reins serious injury if horse flips over on you!The leg spin works but you have to be quick as rabbit! Have had several sent to me because of this when I broke young horses, the egg or a baggie with jello works too but again you have to be quick .My personal feeling is that once a horse has mastered this very bad habit you must be quite a horse man to break the habit.I was successful with some but one I had one that was so bad about it that after three weeks I sent him back to his owner because I literally felt if I got hurt badly I could've been crippled .So be warned unless you are very compitent do not attempt to train this out alone!
    Brilyntrip



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Nov. 23, 1999
    Location
    So.CA
    Posts
    5,821

    Default

    I had a chronic rearer, and my trainer recommended hitting him on the poll with the crop. That worked...for a while. He eventually figured out how to rear and twist his head so that it was difficult to smack him...and then he'd buck. So it may work once or twice, but I don't think it's necessarily a long term fix. In this particular situation, the trainer never helped me fix the problem and I subsequently left her (also after finding out the horse had navicular problems which I had suspected but was convinced by my trainer that I was imagining things....LONG STORY!). I have since heard that the circling mentioned by everyone is an effective way of dealing with a rearer. Fortunately, I have not had to deal with that problem again!



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Oct. 5, 1999
    Location
    A place called vertigo
    Posts
    12,605

    Default

    If you try to hit the horse on the poll and miss, you may put out his eye.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    May. 19, 2000
    Posts
    558

    Default

    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>What worked for me was, As soon as I thought that he may even be thinking of rearing...I dug my left spur into him and pinned his head to my knee and made him do some tight circles for a while VTRIDER <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    From my little bit of experience, I agree with VTRIDER and DMK on this. Usually a rear is the beginning of a pivot/rollback to go the other way-so you need to catch and double them before they accomplish it. I've also found that to gallop them, hard, once you've got them facing the right direction, can reinforce the "go forward".

    I've been around people who subscribe to the whack them over the head theory, and have tried it myself- I think it's done in frustration. If any thing I think you endanger your self doing it.

    Another one that I've heard of and seen, but don't quite have the kahungas to try (and hope to never have to) would be to step down and pull them over as they go up, and then sit on their neck. I've read that it can work, but quite honestly if a horse is that bad, I'd be shipping him or paying some one else to try it.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jul. 9, 1999
    Location
    NYC baby
    Posts
    172

    Default

    My boyfriend used to train horses and one was particulary horrible about rearing. Nothing worked. So as a last resort, he took it up a hill and when it reared up, he leaned back and pulled the horse over so the horse fell on his back (jumping very quickly out of the way!)

    This had worked 100% of the time, except for this horse which proceeded to rear again almost immediately after my boyfriend got back on. So, my boyfriend told the owner to sell it straight away.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jun. 30, 2000
    Location
    The Confederacy
    Posts
    5,066

    Default

    EXACTLY MOOSE!

    Think people...what is the most collected movement a horse can do - it's a REAR! A horse can't rear if it's nose is poked out! If you horse is getting behind the vertical...and you THINK he may be getting ready to rear...throw your anti'rear plan into action IMMEDIATELY!!! Don't give him another split second to think about it!



Similar Threads

  1. Help with a horse that rears
    By AliO in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 77
    Last Post: Aug. 1, 2012, 04:35 PM
  2. Training the Parelli horse that rears? (LONG)
    By Losgelassenheit in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 59
    Last Post: Nov. 27, 2011, 12:46 AM
  3. Horse that rears
    By Amerex in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 68
    Last Post: Nov. 3, 2010, 09:42 AM
  4. Horse bucks/rears off property?
    By LaLuna in forum Eventing
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: Oct. 28, 2010, 10:28 PM
  5. Horse that rears -- what to do?
    By CanterQueen in forum Off Course
    Replies: 30
    Last Post: Jul. 10, 2009, 10:25 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •