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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May. 27, 2008
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    East Jesus No-Where
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    728

    Default The Phone Call....Who else gets these?

    New Client: Hello, is this Tumbleweed equestrian? I was referred to you.

    Me: yes.

    NC: do you have any openings?

    Me: Yes, please tell me about your child

    NC: Well, she is 8yo and has been taking lessons in Va. She can tack up on her own and groom and everything.

    Me: Excellent, and what style was she riding?

    NC: a Pony.

    Me: I'm sorry, I ment what discipline was she learning?

    NC: Oh, English! She is very good, not a beginner at all, much more advanced; she was learning to post when we left.....

    Me: Big silent sigh, and off in to explaining how I run my program.
    The Mom seemed very open to my teaching methods after I explained I would be putting her daughter on a lung line for my benefit in order to see what her child is capable of.

    They seem like they will be nice people. But, still, that just made me chuckle...
    “Four things greater than all things are, - Women and Horses and Power and War”



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep. 21, 2001
    Location
    Parker, Colorado
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    2,611

    Default

    Why is that funny?
    An 8-year old who can tack up herself strikes me as pretty darn good. My 8 year old can barely even carry the saddle herself, and is definitely not strong enough to do up a girth or put on a bridle by herself. She has also been riding since she was 4, but I haven't bothered to teach her to post because said 10.2h pony has a sewing machine trot - posting that fast *is* hard!

    Are you this condescending to all of your prospective clients?
    where are we going, and why am I in this hand basket?



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug. 11, 2010
    Location
    Bay Area, CA
    Posts
    195

    Default

    haha "Not a beginner at all, much more advanced; she was learning to post.."
    ::Karley::

    Henry (House of Fortuny) 7 yr old OTTB
    http://dondeestahenry.blogspot.com/



  4. #4
    Join Date
    May. 11, 2010
    Location
    PA
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    755

    Default

    I didn't find it condescending. I found it typical of parents who think their child is much more advanced than they really are but dont know differently.

    Made me chuckle, but then again I'm not so sensitive about internet posts that are not directly about me (and heck, even the ones that ARE about me )



  5. #5
    Join Date
    May. 27, 2008
    Location
    East Jesus No-Where
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    Default

    Exactly ComingBack. At least this Mom was honest! Some of the calls I get are really crazy!
    “Four things greater than all things are, - Women and Horses and Power and War”



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    15,515

    Default

    I got a similar one for a green 17.2hh warmblood for sale, 30 days under saddle, upper level potential for an advanced rider only.

    Mom: When can I come out to see the horse for my 6 year old daughter.

    Me: The horse needs an advanced rider.

    Mom: My child IS advanced. She's been taking lessons for 6 months.

    Me: Have your trainer call me.

    Mom: Trainer?

    Me: Sigh.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  7. #7
    Join Date
    May. 27, 2008
    Location
    East Jesus No-Where
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    Default

    OH MY!! Usually in my calls the 6Yo child has been riding that in lessons! LOL

    My eyes would have popped out of my head!
    “Four things greater than all things are, - Women and Horses and Power and War”



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep. 21, 2001
    Location
    Parker, Colorado
    Posts
    2,611

    Default

    Maybe the horse business is different from the rest of the world? In my business, if I posted about my prospective clients' ignorance and then made fun of them on an internet BB, I would soon have no clients. The world is just not that big.
    where are we going, and why am I in this hand basket?



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
    Location
    The rocky part of KY
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    Default

    I wonder if other athletic or sports type activities get the same thing. They must, otherwise there wouldn't be tryouts for HS sports to see who goes JV or V.

    It strikes me as downright dangerous as an instructor to assume that the parents know a darn thing that they are talking about in terms of their kids' abilities. That's why I see so many policies that call for an assessment before the kid is placed in a level.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



  10. #10
    Join Date
    May. 15, 2006
    Location
    Eastern WV Panhandle
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    1,246

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rhymeswithfizz View Post
    Maybe the horse business is different from the rest of the world? In my business, if I posted about my prospective clients' ignorance and then made fun of them on an internet BB, I would soon have no clients. The world is just not that big.
    Nope, it's not, but at least the board where I see the harshest stuff is not available to anyone except industry insiders. The OP's story is quite tame by comparison.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct. 28, 2007
    Location
    NY
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    3,870

    Default

    The stables I have been at start you out on the long line. I think that's just smart. If you are a good enough rider, you don't get offended.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2005
    Location
    Alabama
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    7,418

    Default

    I don't think the OP and others are being harsh at all. They're just amazed that someone would endanger their kid by getting them a horse they can't possibly control, and by saying their kid is much more advanced than a total beginner. It's not just with horses or ponies either. I'm sure it happens to gymnastics coaches, skiing coaches and other sports too. And when the kid gets hurt it's never the parent's fault, but the coach's fault.

    It's time that people that aren't good coaches are lying to parents about their child's abilities, and how well they are learning. It's better to be honest, and take time learning instead of pushing kids and horses too fast and burning the kids out, or getting them hurt.
    You can't fix stupid-Ron White



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar. 28, 2002
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    East of Dog River
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    5,519

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ReSomething View Post
    I wonder if other athletic or sports type activities get the same thing. They must, otherwise there wouldn't be tryouts for HS sports to see who goes JV or V.

    It strikes me as downright dangerous as an instructor to assume that the parents know a darn thing that they are talking about in terms of their kids' abilities. That's why I see so many policies that call for an assessment before the kid is placed in a level.
    Yes, it happens in other sports, even down to the lowly neighbourhood bowling league. Always has been that way regardless of sport - here, when I was growing up, every single boy child was forced to play hockey or at least try out, even if said child protested violently against it and every girl was forced into figure skating (not me, I was too inept on skates and very much a danger to others and banned). This isn't new, has been going on for years.
    Founder of the Dyslexic Clique. Dyslexics of the world - UNTIE!!

    Member: Incredible Invisbles



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2006
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    Fort Worth, Texas
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    3,754

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kchfuller View Post
    haha "Not a beginner at all, much more advanced; she was learning to post.."
    not as many of the advanced riders since they took away those mechanical horses you put the dime that were in front of the grocery stores



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun. 6, 2010
    Location
    Ontario Canada
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    82

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by comingback View Post
    I didn't find it condescending. I found it typical of parents who think their child is much more advanced than they really are but dont know differently.

    Made me chuckle, but then again I'm not so sensitive about internet posts that are not directly about me (and heck, even the ones that ARE about me )
    Quote Originally Posted by ReSomething View Post
    I wonder if other athletic or sports type activities get the same thing. They must, otherwise there wouldn't be tryouts for HS sports to see who goes JV or V.

    It strikes me as downright dangerous as an instructor to assume that the parents know a darn thing that they are talking about in terms of their kids' abilities. That's why I see so many policies that call for an assessment before the kid is placed in a level.
    +1 to both of you.. I'm a CSIA level one ski instructor. Been the supervisor of the 3-5 year old program for three years. Have taught for 7. Many parents think their 3, 4, 5, 8 or whatever year old will be the next olympian super star.. especially if they've gone out and bought them $2000 skis that they will out grow by March as they are super little..

    I get lots of "my child excelled at xyz hill as they were on blue runs!!! Yes blue runs!!" "Great I know that resort well, like which blue runs?" "Oh doesn't matter he/she did blue!! ones..." Nice. Resorts are rated against themselves. Not each other. A blue run somewhere with massive hard hills will generally be harder than somewhere with fewer challenging ones.. so yes, it matters..

    But yes, parents in every sport are like this.. If an instructor comes to me to tell me little Johnny needs a higher level class, I have to watch them ski before it's even a slight possibility, as I don't take a parents word on what their kid can do.. It too is a dangerous sport when things go wrong.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb. 27, 2005
    Posts
    489

    Default

    Try this one:

    I trained and taught in a pricey resort area for several years. One summer I got a call from a lady from out of state. They planned on spending the entire summer in the resort community, and she wanted her son to continue to take riding lessons. She was thrilled to hear that all lessons were private or semi-private, since he'd been riding in a group lesson back home. Then she asked what he would do in an hour lesson. I replied that he would first groom and tack up his horse....at which point she interrupted, and said in a horrified voice "You would subject my child to manual labor????" I responded that it was part of learning to ride....click...dial tone.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Sep. 21, 2001
    Location
    Parker, Colorado
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    2,611

    Default

    Sorry, not making my point very well I guess. Totally agree that you should not take a parent's word on how advanced their kid is. Absolutely yes evaulate kid on your own terms. Definitely educate the beginner parents of a beginner rider.

    Disagree that it is okay to go laugh behind said parent's back (complete with "big silent sigh" at their ignorance of all that is horsey) when they came to you to learn. And pay you money. That is what strikes me as unprofessional.

    I would not bring my child to ride with a trainer who makes fun of the people who write the checks on a public forum. But maybe your business is strong enough to handle that, so have at it.
    where are we going, and why am I in this hand basket?



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Mar. 27, 2009
    Location
    Upstate NY
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    1,537

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rhymeswithfizz View Post
    Sorry, not making my point very well I guess. Totally agree that you should not take a parent's word on how advanced their kid is. Absolutely yes evaulate kid on your own terms. Definitely educate the beginner parents of a beginner rider.

    Disagree that it is okay to go laugh behind said parent's back (complete with "big silent sigh" at their ignorance of all that is horsey) when they came to you to learn. And pay you money. That is what strikes me as unprofessional.

    I would not bring my child to ride with a trainer who makes fun of the people who write the checks on a public forum. But maybe your business is strong enough to handle that, so have at it.
    Guess I shouldn't turn you on to the emergency room doctor's insider's forum.
    Trainer's website - photos of my horse Airborne under About and Francesca Edwards also in media page 1

    http://www.patricianorciadressage.com/



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan. 29, 2010
    Location
    Satan's Steam Sauna
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    626

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Unfforgettable View Post
    Try this one:

    I trained and taught in a pricey resort area for several years. One summer I got a call from a lady from out of state. They planned on spending the entire summer in the resort community, and she wanted her son to continue to take riding lessons. She was thrilled to hear that all lessons were private or semi-private, since he'd been riding in a group lesson back home. Then she asked what he would do in an hour lesson. I replied that he would first groom and tack up his horse....at which point she interrupted, and said in a horrified voice "You would subject my child to manual labor????" I responded that it was part of learning to ride....click...dial tone.
    My husband was in Bahrain for 3 years, and he decided to take riding lessons because I liked to ride horses everywhere we travelled. Anyway, he comes back; and we get a horse, and I find out he has NEVER groomed or tacked up a horse. They had people for that



  20. #20
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    Jan. 29, 2010
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    Satan's Steam Sauna
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    626

    Wink

    Quote Originally Posted by rhymeswithfizz View Post
    Sorry, not making my point very well I guess. Totally agree that you should not take a parent's word on how advanced their kid is. Absolutely yes evaulate kid on your own terms. Definitely educate the beginner parents of a beginner rider.

    Disagree that it is okay to go laugh behind said parent's back (complete with "big silent sigh" at their ignorance of all that is horsey) when they came to you to learn. And pay you money. That is what strikes me as unprofessional.

    I would not bring my child to ride with a trainer who makes fun of the people who write the checks on a public forum. But maybe your business is strong enough to handle that, so have at it.
    I can see your point. And, it could be misinterpreted and offense taken.

    That said, I think in any profession there are stories that resonate either because they are completely of the rails, or, like this case, they are fairly typical and other people in the profession can relate to them. We are also in a time where too many parents think that their child is the most gifted child ever birthed. I am 40+, and my parents and my peer group's parents hoped that if we worked really really hard and didn't screw up that we might turn out okay. So, while I am generally a fan of self-deprecating humor vs. poking fun at others; when dealing with people who have an obnoxiously overinflated sense of their own & their child's importance and talents, they are setting themselves up. And having a chuckle is probably better than lighting up the parent about the danger their bragging might have caused had they found someone foolish enough to take them at their word.

    That said, as someone who rode Western and bareback as a kid and then took English lessons as an adult -- posting and two point felt quite advanced to me; and, in the eyes of my private lesson instructor, a competitive dressge rider, I never quite perfected those skills. Meanwhile, thanks to her endless trotting in circles lessons; I was the star of my adult beginner group classes. I got so advanced that I was jumping -- over poles on the ground. well, I think it was jumping; but it's possible the horse was just stepping over the poles fast. I'm not really sure because I was just focused on trying to stay in 2 point. And, my husband is INDIGNANT when I say we are beginners; because we took lessons. In his eyes, a beginner has never been on a horse - once that hurdle is crossed, you are an experienced intermediate for sure



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