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  1. #1
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    Why do we have so many things which we consider must be done in order to keep a horse alive, sound, jumping, etc? Maybe it is just because we follow along and do what other people do. There are several parts of how we take care of horses, I guess some people call it horsemanship (or uh, something related to that word - - horsemanship)Most people do them with the impression their horses would not perform as well or fall flat on their side dead.

    Are there really reasons for doing the things which I thought about? And, I mean good reasons that make sense, not just the 'horse will fall flat on their head' or 'will loose at shows' answer. That makes things we do sound like superstition. Explain to me WHY the horse will die or get crippled.

    What is the point in tying up a 'warm' horse (aka one that is cool enough to drink water)? Why is there any difference between a horse standing in a stall with no grain and a horse tied up in its stall. There isn't a difference, is there?...

    Why do we blanket horses when we are not showing, not going to be bodyclipped anytime soon, and obviously not cold when the temperature outside is 60 degrees.

    Is there any reason in polowrapping besides keeping cuts off a horses legs? A piece of cotton can't do much, I mean really- think about it.

    Why do some people feel that medicating a horse and riding it is wrong? They claim it isn't fair to ride a slightly sore horse on bute or inject its joints. If the horse doesn't feel minor pains, it doesn't know its in pain! What's the difference to the horse between riding it sound or riding it on 5cc (1 pill or gram) of bute? It won't know!

    Grooming- yea, show horses have to look pretty, but what is the obsession with having spotless horses. You have to upkeep it for a horse to look like a show horse on showdays, but while you are at home why does your horse have to spotless everytime you ride? It doesn't make the horse go differently. It doesn't 'warm up' muscles really.

    Dressage. . . Why? Oh, before someone sits on me or something, let me clarify. I mean for hunters, why does a horse need to be 'on the bit' and flexed at the poll? Don't they just need to canter around without changing pace too much and jump well? Is it possible to overtrain a horse?

    Standing wraps after a lesson or jumping. I think it is crap unless your horse stocks up. How does it 'take away pain?' It would seem like a horses front feet (aka coffin joints) and hocks would hurt the most. Really, what the hell does it do besides keeping a horse from stocking up?

    Grain while a horse is warm: who has ever had a slightly warm (not hot) horse colic from eating their grain? Hell, its so hot down here in summer in the afternoon that I am sure most of the horses are at that 'slightly warm' post riding temp when they get their dinner. They seem to colic more when it gets cold out!

    Training a horse without training a horse. Let me explain. Why do we put all this emphasis on teaching the horse stuff that doesn't matter? Why do we not jump really green horses. Woudn't it take less time if you jumped little 2'6" jumps everyday for a month when it was green. Instead of taking a long time to get a horse jumping around a course it would learn to steer, jump, canter along, and be quiet all at the same time, right? Well, maybe this one is a bit far fetched, but I bet it could work with some horses.

    Uh, thats all I can think of.. I'm finallly sleepy.. Maybe day 4 1/2 of insomnia will close soon becuse I think COTH is putting me to sleep ;P

    I'm just....
    Sliding through life on charm?

    forums.catchride.com
    -----



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 18, 2001
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    Why do we have so many things which we consider must be done in order to keep a horse alive, sound, jumping, etc? Maybe it is just because we follow along and do what other people do. There are several parts of how we take care of horses, I guess some people call it horsemanship (or uh, something related to that word - - horsemanship)Most people do them with the impression their horses would not perform as well or fall flat on their side dead.

    Are there really reasons for doing the things which I thought about? And, I mean good reasons that make sense, not just the 'horse will fall flat on their head' or 'will loose at shows' answer. That makes things we do sound like superstition. Explain to me WHY the horse will die or get crippled.

    What is the point in tying up a 'warm' horse (aka one that is cool enough to drink water)? Why is there any difference between a horse standing in a stall with no grain and a horse tied up in its stall. There isn't a difference, is there?...

    Why do we blanket horses when we are not showing, not going to be bodyclipped anytime soon, and obviously not cold when the temperature outside is 60 degrees.

    Is there any reason in polowrapping besides keeping cuts off a horses legs? A piece of cotton can't do much, I mean really- think about it.

    Why do some people feel that medicating a horse and riding it is wrong? They claim it isn't fair to ride a slightly sore horse on bute or inject its joints. If the horse doesn't feel minor pains, it doesn't know its in pain! What's the difference to the horse between riding it sound or riding it on 5cc (1 pill or gram) of bute? It won't know!

    Grooming- yea, show horses have to look pretty, but what is the obsession with having spotless horses. You have to upkeep it for a horse to look like a show horse on showdays, but while you are at home why does your horse have to spotless everytime you ride? It doesn't make the horse go differently. It doesn't 'warm up' muscles really.

    Dressage. . . Why? Oh, before someone sits on me or something, let me clarify. I mean for hunters, why does a horse need to be 'on the bit' and flexed at the poll? Don't they just need to canter around without changing pace too much and jump well? Is it possible to overtrain a horse?

    Standing wraps after a lesson or jumping. I think it is crap unless your horse stocks up. How does it 'take away pain?' It would seem like a horses front feet (aka coffin joints) and hocks would hurt the most. Really, what the hell does it do besides keeping a horse from stocking up?

    Grain while a horse is warm: who has ever had a slightly warm (not hot) horse colic from eating their grain? Hell, its so hot down here in summer in the afternoon that I am sure most of the horses are at that 'slightly warm' post riding temp when they get their dinner. They seem to colic more when it gets cold out!

    Training a horse without training a horse. Let me explain. Why do we put all this emphasis on teaching the horse stuff that doesn't matter? Why do we not jump really green horses. Woudn't it take less time if you jumped little 2'6" jumps everyday for a month when it was green. Instead of taking a long time to get a horse jumping around a course it would learn to steer, jump, canter along, and be quiet all at the same time, right? Well, maybe this one is a bit far fetched, but I bet it could work with some horses.

    Uh, thats all I can think of.. I'm finallly sleepy.. Maybe day 4 1/2 of insomnia will close soon becuse I think COTH is putting me to sleep ;P

    I'm just....
    Sliding through life on charm?

    forums.catchride.com
    -----



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug. 10, 1999
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    Ireland & sometimes the US ;)
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    I agree with you in many ways, Darkerhorse. Much of what we do in the US is NOT done in other places in the world, and I don't think our horses ARE better off for it! Much of what we do NOT do misses the point, also.

    Looking at the individual issues you mention:

    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> What is the point in tying up a 'warm' horse (aka one that is cool enough to drink water)? Why is there any difference between a horse standing in a stall with no grain and a horse tied up in its stall. There isn't a difference, is there?... <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    I don't understand this one either. Tying a horse in the stall to prevent them from eating or drinking perhaps, but in all honesty, the horse should be cool enough to go back into his stall when you are finished. THAT is HORSEMANSHIP!

    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> Why do we blanket horses when we are not showing, not going to be bodyclipped anytime soon, and obviously not cold when the temperature outside is 60 degrees. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Blanketing is simply to protect the coat so it DOES look good when showing. You are protecting it from sun as well as rain, etc. It really isn't necessary, simply cosmetic.

    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> Is there any reason in polowrapping besides keeping cuts off a horses legs? A piece of cotton can't do much, I mean really- think about it. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Couldn't agree more. I don't think polowraps protect at all - certainly not from concussion - or at least not as well as rubber lined boots. And there is more chance of causing problems with polo wraps - too tight, too loose, incorrectly wrapped, etc. However, there use is a matter of opinion; their CORRECT application is a matter of horsemanship.

    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Why do some people feel that medicating a horse and riding it is wrong? They claim it isn't fair to ride a slightly sore horse on bute or inject its joints. If the horse doesn't feel minor pains, it doesn't know its in pain! What's the difference to the horse between riding it sound or riding it on 5cc (1 pill or gram) of bute? It won't know! <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    I am of that group who disagrees with you here, DH! I believe it is more important to have a horse FIT, HEALTHY, and HAPPY. If a horse is sore/unsound, he isn't those things. IMHO, Americans over medicate and use it as an excuse for not getting their horses properly fit and strong. THAT is a HORSEMANSHIP issue, and one that will remain argued!! However, would you run a race unprepared and unfit? How can you ask your horse to do the same? If your horse is sore after a show, then he isn't fit enough. (I don't take aspirin myself, either)

    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Grooming- yea, show horses have to look pretty, but what is the obsession with having spotless horses. You have to upkeep it for a horse to look like a show horse on showdays, but while you are at home why does your horse have to spotless everytime you ride? It doesn't make the horse go differently. It doesn't 'warm up' muscles really. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    My barn owner in NJ used to say a dirty horse is a happy horse. I think we over wash our horses and take all the healthy stuff out of their coats - therefore we have to put it all back in. Ridiculous. It is the natural oils in the coat that give it the shine! If you groom your horse every day - NOT WASH - GROOM - the coat will be sleeker, shinier, and their muscles will feel better!

    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> Dressage. . . Why? Oh, before someone sits on me or something, let me clarify. I mean for hunters, why does a horse need to be 'on the bit' and flexed at the poll? Don't they just need to canter around without changing pace too much and jump well? Is it possible to overtrain a horse? <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Two part question, here. Dressage? Well for those who really know anything about dressage, that term really is meaningless until you are at least at 3rd level. Anything below that is flatwork. The basics of flatwork for ANY horse are the same - supple, balanced, obediant, and FORWARD. Flatwork gives you that, so you can perform in whatever discipline you choose. A balanced hunter, properly moving forward from his hind end WILL jump better - loose rein or not. A proper STRETCH brings the horse's back up and his hind end engages increasing the stride and suspension - how many hunters really do that correctly? Or are they just putting their heads down into some kind of "pretty frame" and tiptoeing around? Does your horse have problems engaging his front end over a fence? Try some flatwork. Don't think he can jump more than 2'? Try some flatwork. Stength, balance, and agility can all be increased that way.

    Can you overtrain a horse? DEFINITELY!!! Horses get sour, sore, grouchy, nasty, etc, when overtrained. That is why riding out is so important!! Horses also get that way when incorrectly trained...

    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> Standing wraps after a lesson or jumping. I think it is crap unless your horse stocks up. How does it 'take away pain?' It would seem like a horses front feet (aka coffin joints) and hocks would hurt the most. Really, what the hell does it do besides keeping a horse from stocking up? <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Couldn't agree more! After a lesson or jumping? That shouldn't be enough stress to have to wrap, or that the horse stocks up. If your horse does, it probably needs more turnout, and more hardening fitness exercises. Many years ago, Lars Senderholm wrote an excellent article in the USCTA News about how the Americans over-wrap. That remains true.

    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Grain while a horse is warm: who has ever had a slightly warm (not hot) horse colic from eating their grain? Hell, its so hot down here in summer in the afternoon that I am sure most of the horses are at that 'slightly warm' post riding temp when they get their dinner. They seem to colic more when it gets cold out!
    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Horses colic more in the cold, as that is when they don't drink enough water. I don't know much about feeding in the heat (It always worried me) - nor much about how you really can make sure your horse is cool enough, when the weather is over 100 degrees and humid. However, there was a lot of study done before the Atlanta Olympics on the effects of heat and humidity on Event horses - maybe you should read up on it and look for your answers there.

    I will say that I have seen a hot horse colic when fed too soon after work. (Not one of mine, one in a barn where I was boarding.) I have also seen them survive it with no problem - amazingly enough. Do some reesearch and report back, ok? http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_c.../icon_wink.gif

    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> Training a horse without training a horse. Let me explain. Why do we put all this emphasis on teaching the horse stuff that doesn't matter? Why do we not jump really green horses. Woudn't it take less time if you jumped little 2'6" jumps everyday for a month when it was green. Instead of taking a long time to get a horse jumping around a course it would learn to steer, jump, canter along, and be quiet all at the same time, right? Well, maybe this one is a bit far fetched, but I bet it could work with some horses. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    As I explained on another thread, jumping small jumps from the start IS part of my trainer's method - and I agree. I was walking my four year old over poles from the first time I hand walked him - when we finally let him trot and canter a gymnastic free schooling, he was extremely lackadasical about it! He is now jumping little logs and barrels out in the field - he goes forward, is straight, and very relaxed. He went through trot poles in the ring the first time she took him in there - they were nothing special, just part of the routine. I like the notion that jumping is nothing different than every day work. When we do this with the babies, they don't jump twenty fences - they jump 2 or 3 or 4 - that's it - and all very quiet, no surprises!

    Remember, every time you ride the horse, you are training it - whether you are planning to or not!

    Good questions, DH, and I look forward to other people's comments.

    It's OUT! Linda Allen's 101 Exercises for Jumping co-authored by MOI!!! http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_c...on_biggrin.gif
    co-author of 101 Jumping Exercises & The Rider's Fitness Program; Soon to come: Dead Ringer - a tale of equine mystery and intrique! Former Moderator!



  4. #4
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    May. 30, 2000
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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Darkerhorse:


    Why do we blanket horses when we are not showing, not going to be bodyclipped anytime soon, and obviously not cold when the temperature outside is 60 degrees.

    Amen, I never understood that myself! We don't blanket our non showing barely ridden in the winter fur balls. And I get looks like I am from another planet if I tell people. Our horses are fat, furry, healthy and are in stalls at night and in bad weather. Why blanket? I worry about rubs and sliding blankets for them to get tangled up in.

    Standing wraps after a lesson or jumping. I think it is crap unless your horse stocks up. How does it 'take away pain?' It would seem like a horses front feet (aka coffin joints) and hocks would hurt the most. Really, what the hell does it do besides keeping a horse from stocking up?

    Also agree. Where I used to work they would wrap the horses and leave them in stalls after lessons and shows. I always thought they would be better off turned out without wraps, maybe boots or something, so they could move around and NOT stock up and get stiff standing in a stall.
    I'm just....
    Sliding through life on charm?

    forums.catchride.com<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
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    www.timberrunponies.com



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun. 21, 1999
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    Or the otherside of the question is horsemanship not as much what we do that may not be necessary versus what we DON'T do that we should?

    Too many people in the sport (hear me out before you stomp on me) aren't in touch with their horse. While some people do need the help of someone tacking up so that they can ride (read: working 40+ hours/week to afford the riding) there are too many that rely on the "full service" facility so that they don't HAVE to do it.

    The days of the horseman who comes out and truly knows them are dwindling. Minor ailments and injuries that a horseman would handle on his own send the modern owner running screaming for the vet. How many can truly bandage the injured horse and maintain it during care for the injury instead of just relying on the barn staff because they can't be bothered?

    It goes back to the thread about the recent Between Rounds column on needing more cowboy in our riders. That is what we have created: riders. Fortunately at our barn we don't have staff that can groom and tack for the up and coming people. They are creating horseman. If the lesson kids can't ride then they get an indoor non-riding lesson in bandaging, horse care etc. If they want to show they have to be able to function independently in getting their horse ready to show. They have tack cleaning and grooming parties the night before so that they can support each other and learn from each other too. There are no grooms. I heard about a barn where the people who boarded there did NOTHING for themselves. There was an entire flotilla of staff that did it all. Including the barn worker who got down on one knee so that the kid could mount her horse using him as the mounting block! All while she was heard to say she didn't know why she was riding that day since she was so tired. From doing what? It certainly wasn't taking care of her pony. Would she know if it was off slightly and needed her attention? If she doesn't pick it's feet how does she know if it has thrush, a slightly bent shoe or a loose nail?

    Bottom line: the horseman gives his/her horse the attention it needs all the time. They don't leave a note for the barn staff that says something needs their attention as a first line reaction. It is not just the pointless crap that is being done that doesn't make a horseman it is the not doing the basics of the day to day needs of a horse that keeps someone a rider and not a horseman.

    "I drank what?" Socrates
    \"The credit belongs to those people who are actually in the arena...who know the great enthusiasms, the great devotions to a worthy cause; who at best, know the triumph of high achievement; and who, at worst, fail while daring greatly, so that their



  6. #6
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    Aug. 14, 2001
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    In many ways I agree with you. My dad always cracks jokes about how us horse people baby our horses WAY too much.....

    *PinkPonie
    Steph



  7. #7
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    Apr. 26, 2001
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    I think it's pointless to restate everything, especially since I agree wholeheartedly with Weatherford. Good points Richard. One other thing to think about is that "horsemanship" is also knowing when not to do all of that stuff.

    "Keep your stick on the ice." (Red Green)
    \"Horses change lives. They give our young people confidence and self esteem, they provide peace and tranquility to troubled souls, they give us hope.\"
    - T. Robinson



  8. #8
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    Nov. 21, 2002
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    For those of us that truly love our horses, and are concerned about their well-being, it is not useless crap to ensure that they recieve the best treatment necessary - they are not f**cking machines.

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  9. #9
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    Sorry, my short attention span doesn't let me read anymore than the original and one or two after that...

    I totaly agree with Weatherford/DH on everything...weird...(I'm usually the queen of dissenting opinions).

    Anyhow, above all the jumping thing has always amazed me. All my guys learn to jump in the state park, follow the leader style, after having appropriate time to come down after the track (varies horse to horse). They pretty much know "Go" and ummm that's about it. I've always found it helpful, they can worry about rythm and all that other junk later. I find, like with little kids, if they think it's fun and see their friends doing it....10 billion times easier to get them to do it.
    Just my $.02



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar. 20, 2001
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    "Why do we have so many things which we consider must be done in order to keep a horse alive, sound, jumping, etc?"

    Actually, I want my horses to be healthy, fit, and content - all the time. Not just survive my riding.

    "Training a horse without training a horse. Let me explain. Why do we put all this emphasis on teaching the horse stuff that doesn't matter?"

    There isn't much you can teach a horse that 'doesn't matter.' I want my horses to understand their job, be confident and respond immediately when I ask them to do something.

    I have seen lots of horses ruined and broken down by people who think that taking care of a horse and training it are just boring dull work.
    Sad for them, sadder for their horses.

    I was going to respond to some other points in this post - but why bother?

    http://chronicleforums.com/images/cu...ilies/sigh.gif

    BarbB

    ...virtue shall be bound into the hair of thy forelock... I have given thee the power of flight without wings

    Tapestry website, dogs and horses



  11. #11
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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by lotsospots:
    For those of us that truly love our horses, and are concerned about their well-being, it is not useless crap to ensure that they recieve the best treatment necessary - they are not f**cking machines.


    Spot this!!
    http://www.thiessenhorses.freeservers.com&lt;HR&gt;&lt;/BLOCKQUOTE&gt;


    I think DarkerHorse makes some good points. I think most EVERYONE wants their horse to have the best treatment, but some of what we do makes us feel better and does little to make the horses better and certainly is NOT necessary for the well being of the horse. Just my opinion.
    ~*Adult Pony Rider Clique*~
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  12. #12
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    I can't answer all the questions, but I do have a couple points to make:

    About polo wraps: I don't use them, but those I know that do use them just to prevent nicks and cuts (not for support). Actually, most use boots for the same reason (I only know one rider who prefers polos, and she does so for the looks--she hates the look of boots). Is it so bad to prevent nicks and cuts?

    About medication: I guess the difference is whether you're using the medication therapeutically (to help the horse and prevent future damage) or to cover an existing problem. I believe that most pain is there for a reason: to tell us that something is wrong. Bute can help reduce inflammation which can cause future problems. And often riding can help because it gets to muscles going and the blood flowing and that can help in recovery. But I do have a problem riding when it can cause future damage. If a horse needs time off and a rider masks the pain because they want to compete, that I have a problem with. But not the use of medication in and of itself.

    On blankets: yes, my horse would do just fine with her natural coat--if all she did was hang out in a field and come in occassionally to eat. But she has a job, and it takes forever for me to cool her down with her natural coat. Not to mention that she gets incredibly hot working in that woolly coat (apparently, she didn't read the book saying that TBs don't get much of a coat--she's a darn mammoth!) So she gets clipped and her natural protection from cold is gone. But she doesn't have to wear a coat when it's 65 degrees! The only time she wears clothing when it's that warm is when she has a show the next day, she's getting turned out, and I don't want to find at 5:00 am that her grey coat turned green overnight! http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_c...n_rolleyes.gif

    On grooming: SPOTLESS? Bwahahahahahahaaaa... the mare is now two-toned: grey where the blanket goes, yellow-green everywhere else! http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_c.../icon_razz.gif Yes, I groom her before I ride, but I don't spot clean her. I groom her because 1) she likes it, 2) I like it and it gives me some bonding time with her, 3) it's a good way to check her for pasture boo boos, 4) I'm fanatical about removing mud and dirt from the saddle and bridle areas, and 5) I believe it shows in the coat in the long term if it's kept curried and brushed. But the best currying and brushing is not going to remove stains. I don't worry about those if I'm not showing.

    But some people like to keep their horses pretty whether they're showing or not. Who am I to criticize? If they like it, more power to them.



  13. #13
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    I'm not going to reiterate points I agree with, but I think one thing that needs to be said is that we are responsible for EVERYTHING that happens to these animals. Yes, in the wild they would survive without grooming, shoeing, etc. But, it's been a long time since the horses we know were anything like wild horses. It's like the Fox says in the Little Prince -- man tamed them, and now needs to be responsible for them. That goes for all aspects of care and comfort.

    If I lived in a 12 x 12 stall all day with minimal turnout, I'd be glad for any extra attention!

    *EMMA*



  14. #14
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    I think all of these methods started out with the horses' best interest in mind, and are not just "useless crap".

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  15. #15
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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>
    What is the point in tying up a 'warm' horse (aka one that is cool enough to drink water)? Why is there any
    difference between a horse standing in a stall with no grain and a horse tied up in its stall. There isn't a
    difference, is there?...<HR></BLOCKQUOTE> No idea <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> Why do we blanket horses when we are not showing, not going to be bodyclipped anytime soon, and obviously
    not cold when the temperature outside is 60 degrees.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE> Probably because WE would be cold, and we are anthropomorphizing.<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> Is there any reason in polowrapping besides keeping cuts off a horses legs? A piece of cotton can't do much, I
    mean really- think about it. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE> Purely cosmetic.<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> Why do some people feel that medicating a horse and riding it is wrong? They claim it isn't fair to ride a slightly sore horse on bute or inject its joints. If the horse doesn't feel minor pains, it doesn't know its in pain! What's the difference to the horse between riding it sound or riding it on 5cc (1 pill or gram) of bute? It won't know!<HR></BLOCKQUOTE> This is a biggie. In "nature" pain serves, among other things, to prevent the horse from overusing the injured joint/muscle. etc., and injuring it further. If the horse is on pain killers, it no longer realizes that it needs to protect the injury, and is likely to make the problem worse.<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> Grooming- yea, show horses have to look pretty, but what is the obsession with having spotless horses. You have to upkeep it for a horse to look like a show horse on showdays, but while you are at home why does your horse have to spotless everytime you ride? It doesn't make the horse go differently. It doesn't 'warm up' muscles
    really.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>(1) You need to make sure the area under the saddle, girth, and bridle are clean, or you will create sores were the tack rubs the dirt into the skin.
    (2)By grooming the horse all over, even lightly, you are more likely to notice small injuries, cuts, etc. before thay become problems.
    (3) Grooming stimulates the skin. Whatever the actual mechanics, grooming thoroughly every day s the best way to create a "gleaming" coat on show day. <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> Dressage. . . Why? Oh, before someone sits on me or something, let me clarify. I mean for hunters, why does a horse need to be 'on the bit' and flexed at the poll? Don't they just need to canter around without changing pace too much and jump well? Is it possible to overtrain a horse?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE> A hunter needs to APPEAR to maintain a constant pace, which means you may need to make subtle adjustments in pace. Dressage (done right) allows you to make the horse more adjustable. <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> Standing wraps after a lesson or jumping. I think it is crap unless your horse stocks up. How does it 'take away pain?' It would seem like a horses front feet (aka coffin joints) and hocks would hurt the most. Really, what the hell does it do besides keeping a horse from stocking up? <HR></BLOCKQUOTE> Primary purpose is to prevent stocking up. <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> Grain while a horse is warm: who has ever had a slightly warm (not hot) horse colic from eating their grain? Hell, its so hot down here in summer in the afternoon that I am sure most of the horses are at that 'slightly warm' post riding temp when they get their dinner. They seem to colic more when it gets cold out!<HR></BLOCKQUOTE> The issue here is not actual temperature, but that more of the blood is flowing through the musles, and less is going to the digestive tract. It is sort of like (but the other way around)the rule that swimming too soon after eating increases the chance of cramps.<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> Training a horse without training a horse. Let me explain. Why do we put all this emphasis on teaching the horse stuff that doesn't matter? Why do we not jump really green horses. Woudn't it take less time if you jumped little2'6" jumps everyday for a month when it was green. Instead of taking a long time to get a horse jumping around a course it would learn to steer, jump, canter along, and be quiet all at the same time, right? Well, maybe this one is a bit far fetched, but I bet it could work with some horses. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE> Need to walk before you run. What happens on the approach has a lot more influence on how well the horse jumps. Also, you don't want to pound a young horse's joints, etc. with a lot of jumping.

    If the horse DOES jump calmly, great. But if the horse starts to go too fast, too slow, etc. you need the "tools" to address tha
    Janet

    chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle and Tiara. Someone else is now feeding and mucking for Chief and Brain (both foxhunting now).



  16. #16
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    Have you ever wrapped a polo wrap on your own leg? Its like a mild version of an ace bandage, or an SMB. They DO support the leg- for those of you who think they are simply to protect from cuts, you must not have learned how to wrap polo wraps correctly.

    "Why wrap a horse after jumping unless they stock up?" Wraps do not "take away pain." Put on correctly, they give your horse's legs extra support, like polo wraps. My horse's tendons in his front legs tend to be loose and easily injured, so I wrap him after we jump. Most horses don't need the extra tendon support unless they have been working extra hard (ie showing).



  17. #17
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    Standing wraps after a lesson or jumping. I think it is crap unless your horse stocks up. How does it 'take away pain?' It would seem like a horses front feet (aka coffin joints) and hocks would hurt the most. Really, what the hell does it do besides keeping a horse from stocking up?
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Well, I don't think this is crap, and I don't follow to prevent stocking up. The reason for this ( by the way we don't wrap we poultice and pack feet) is to take away any heat that may have evolved during the workout session and to
    protect the horses legs by capturing the heat through either a linament such as alcohol or a nice poultice like uptite.

    Owner/Trainer of Plumsted Equestrian Center Inc,NJ



  18. #18
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    I have to say that I agree with quite a few of your points, Darkerhorse. I don't think that polo wraps offer any support whatsoever (and there have been tests done that support that), I think blanketing is overdone (especially for unclipped non-show horses), and I don't think that standing wraps really help that much (other than to prevent stocking up). Nor do I think that horses have to be spotless...in fact, I think they prefer to be a little dirty. Why else would they find the muddiest spot possible and choose to roll in it?

    visit www.victorianfarms.com



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Feb. 22, 2000
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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> What is the point in tying up a 'warm' horse (aka one that is cool enough to drink water)? Why is there any difference between a horse standing in a stall with no grain and a horse tied up in its stall. There isn't a difference, is there?...<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Well, personally, I prefer it when my warm horses don't get down and roll as they inevitably will if not tied up. When you do get around to grooming them it's nice to not have to deal with sweat encrusted shavings.
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> Is there any reason in polowrapping besides keeping cuts off a horses legs? A piece of cotton can't do much, I mean really- think about it.
    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
    Polos actually do offer support for the leg and tendons, even more than most boots do.
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Dressage. . . Why? Oh, before someone sits on me or something, let me clarify. I mean for hunters, why does a horse need to be 'on the bit' and flexed at the poll? Don't they just need to canter around without changing pace too much and jump well? Is it possible to overtrain a horse? <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
    I agree here. It is entirely possible to overtrain a hunter. They should generally be left to do as comes natural, unless there is something that needs to be corrected. I don't want my hunters flexed or on the bit, I want their noses poked out and almost a loop in the reins.
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> Grain while a horse is warm: who has ever had a slightly warm (not hot) horse colic from eating their grain? Hell, its so hot down here in summer in the afternoon that I am sure most of the horses are at that 'slightly warm' post riding temp when they get their dinner. They seem to colic more when it gets cold out!
    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
    I'm not sure on this one, but my trainer does agree that it's a myth.



  20. #20
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    Jun. 17, 2001
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    [QUOTE]Originally posted by Darkerhorse:
    Why do we have so many things which we consider must be done in order to keep a horse alive, sound, jumping, etc?..........
    What is the point in tying up a 'warm' horse (aka one that is cool enough to drink water)?
    ____________________________________________

    Don't know, unless it's clean and waiting for a class and you don't want it to roll or rub the braids out...and mine get all the water they want if tied for these reasons.


    " Why is there any difference between a horse standing in a stall with no grain and a horse tied up in its stall. There isn't a difference, is there?..."
    ________________________________________________

    Don't get the point here.


    "Why do we blanket horses when we are not showing, not going to be bodyclipped anytime soon, and obviously not cold when the temperature outside is 60 degrees."
    ________________________________________________

    Don't know. I don't. Fancy magazine ads convincing us we need to?


    "Is there any reason in polowrapping besides keeping cuts off a horses legs? A piece of cotton can't do much, I mean really- think about it."
    ________________________________________________

    But keeping the cuts off their legs is not a bad thing...is it?


    "Why do some people feel that medicating a horse and riding it is wrong? They claim it isn't fair to ride a slightly sore horse on bute or inject its joints. If the horse doesn't feel minor pains, it doesn't know its in pain! What's the difference to the horse between riding it sound or riding it on 5cc (1 pill or gram) of bute? It won't know!"
    _________________________________________________
    If it's sore we don't ride it. If it's older it may get a little bute,as do most of them when bedded on concrete at the shows. But it's not done on a daily basis at home. They get that sore they are retired or laid up as indicated.


    "Grooming- yea, show horses have to look pretty, but what is the obsession with having spotless horses. You have to upkeep it for a horse to look like a show horse on showdays, but while you are at home why does your horse have to spotless everytime you ride? It doesn't make the horse go differently. It doesn't 'warm up' muscles really."
    ________________________________________________

    OH I GET IT. YOU ARE KIDDING HERE!!!!! AREN'T YOU? Sometimes you can get you tongue so firmly in cheek others can't see it. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_c...n_rolleyes.gif


    Slow on the uptake due sugar overload.

    Point of this sarcastic post is well taken

    The Horse World. 2 people, 3 opinions. That's the way it is.

    [This message was edited by findeight on Jan. 05, 2003 at 07:14 PM.]
    When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

    The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.



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