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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct. 4, 2008
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    Default Posting too fast

    I thought some of you instructors might have an exercise or two to help this situation.

    I have a student who is a great rider, but her upper body is extremely quick. It has it's pluses, and it's minuses as well. but the biggest is, she is so quick to post that it isn't helping the horse to develop a longer stride. I have tried just about everything I can think of, to no avail. Obviously it feels funny to her as well to try and do it, but I know sometimes, just changing the way you present something can make all the differance in the world.

    So any suggestions would be welcome. If she sits, her tests look great....but as soon as she starts posting, she looks quick and hurried.

    THANKS.
    May the sun shine on you daily, and your worries be gone with the wind.
    www.mmceventing.com



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2009
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    486

    Default

    sony metronome. It's the size of a credit card, can be attached to the saddle. Set it to the correct rhythm and only have her post to this. another quickie is have her sing twinkle twinkle or the abc song. it's the right rhythm and if she gets speedy, she'll get out of breath. Make sure she's posting her hips to her hands and feels that she's pushing her hips to her hands. focusing on that often slows a riders post down in speed and height which then helps it to become longer and slower. My dd's dyslexic and rhythm is totally not in her vocabulary. All of the above help.



  3. #3
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    Oct. 4, 2008
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    Hmmm, is dyslexia a problem for rhythm. This rider is extremely dyslexic. Though she is great at not getting lost on course, and we have to do the inside/outside thing.
    May the sun shine on you daily, and your worries be gone with the wind.
    www.mmceventing.com



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 2009
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    PA
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    Default

    My instructor used to make me post up-up-down or sometimes even up-up-up-down-down instead of up-down for various periods of time. It's a great way to get the rider to pay attention to the rhythm without having to count. It definitely feels weird, but you only do it for a few minutes at a stretch interspersed with regular posting, and it does help you develop a sense of rhythm and balance.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 12, 2000
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    Proud owner of one Lunar acre! (Campanus Crater, The Moon)
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    Default

    Teach her to post usnig her hips, not her upper body. That it's a matter of swinging your hips more open--and only when and as high as the energy of the horse dictates by how much he/she pushes her out of the saddle. It's about creating the energy with your leg and then letting the horse push you out of the saddle and allowing your hips to be soft and open forward toward the front of the saddle. That slows riders down a bit, because they are waiting for the circle of energy from their driving with their leg to the horse pushing them out of the saddle. And if they focus on hips being soft and getting pushed more open, they have to use the horse's energy to make the post happen.
    "Relinquish your whip!!"



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep. 29, 2011
    Location
    Sacramento Valley,Ca
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    37

    Default Try some mental images...

    such as her saddle is made of pnut butter and her breeches are butter..posting is much slower when you are made of such sticky stubstances. then ask her to post from the back of her thigh to the front,,but NOT to clear the tack..just roll from back of thigh to the front..it helps slow things down if she is not trying to physically lift herself clear of the tack. the next one i would try is to sit a quarter of the circle,post a quarter, ad nauseum...or post the short side and sit the long side...something along those lines. Hope she finds something that helps from all this advice.



  7. #7
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    Aug. 17, 2004
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    Rixeyville, VA
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    Default

    If you haven't done so already, video her. Sometimes you have to see what is wrong. If it is is possible to shoot some video of someone else riding the horse and posting at the correct speed, then she would have something to compare, too.

    Or you can just get her a pony with a machine-gun trot and she'll be fine.
    Where Norwegian Fjords Rule
    http://www.ironwood-farm.com



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec. 18, 2009
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    271

    Default

    Posting is doing rising trot?

    I was always taught as a child to watch the outside shoulder and sit as it came back.

    From a Ride with Your Mind trainer I was taught to push my hips forwards which automatically pushes the shoulders back and to sit in the saddle as if you are on a trampoline so as you sit you imagine you are hitting an elastic surface and sit lightly and kind of bounce up this means you are more stable and slightly slower in the rise.
    The only place where success comes before work is in the dictionary.



  9. #9
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    Oct. 4, 2008
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by IronwoodFarm View Post
    If you haven't done so already, video her. Sometimes you have to see what is wrong. If it is is possible to shoot some video of someone else riding the horse and posting at the correct speed, then she would have something to compare, too.

    Or you can just get her a pony with a machine-gun trot and she'll be fine.
    LOL. I had to say something, she just got two ponies to train, and she isn't allowed to ride them now until AFTER she gets the bigger horse rode. On the ponies, I think she posts slower.

    We video'd yesterday, and she was like, WOW, I post WAY fast. So it definetly got the message across.

    These are great suggestions, thank you guys so much!
    May the sun shine on you daily, and your worries be gone with the wind.
    www.mmceventing.com



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun. 1, 2007
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    Default

    What helped me was to think about keeping my butt in the saddle longer as I was posting. The dressage coach told me to think about sitting in the saddle just a bit longer to influence his back. It's HARD though... says she who is a machine gun poster. And Fleck just trots faster too. But when I thought about sitting longer... it helped. I also like the post about thinking about swinging your hips forward too.. that also seemed to help me. And nerves make it worse

    Good luck!



  11. #11
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    Dec. 19, 2009
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    486

    Default

    yes, if your rider is dyslexic, then the area of the brain used for rhythmn is involved. (dd was guinea pig for yale in the fmri and we, among others, now have proof of which I'm speaking. the reason for twinkle twinkle versus counting or saying your posting has to do with the area of the brain used. counting won't work as well, the singing will work better. Your rider probably can't even tell the difference of fast versus slow. Even with posting hips to hands, you will have to use something external if you have dyslexia involved. It's just the way the brain is. We can also attest that with 1-2 years of it, the brain does eventually get better coping (as seen in yale study) although it never goes away. You are essentially forcing more than one part of the brain to finally coordinate information in a way that it doesn't naturally do.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2011
    Location
    Pennsylvania
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    491

    Default

    My instructor has to keep telling me to post "low and slow" when my guy starts rushing because I start posting superfast as well. Keeping that little saying in my head when I ride has helped a lot.
    http://poorwomanshowing.blogspot.com/
    R.I.P. Eagles Hill. 4/6/00-12/10/11.



  13. #13
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    Apr. 29, 2006
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    3,554

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MightyBobbyMagee View Post
    My instructor has to keep telling me to post "low and slow" when my guy starts rushing because I start posting superfast as well.
    A tip from a Mac Cone clinic:

    Count out loud.

    Use a low and slow voice to slow things down or soften your ride. Loud and fast will speed things up.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec. 6, 2010
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    207

    Default

    Sometimes just saying something a different way clicks better. If saying post slower isn't working, have her think about posting higher. It will essentially do the same thing, but maybe the different mental picture and having to focus less on rhythm and more on a feel might end up with the desired effect.



  15. #15
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    Oct. 4, 2008
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    Thanks Guys, we are using the thighs tightening, and legs as you rise up. She just had to remember it. A friend suggested it on facebook.
    May the sun shine on you daily, and your worries be gone with the wind.
    www.mmceventing.com



  16. #16
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    Sep. 14, 2002
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    Azle, Teh-has
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gold2012 View Post
    Hmmm, is dyslexia a problem for rhythm. This rider is extremely dyslexic. Though she is great at not getting lost on course, and we have to do the inside/outside thing.
    me too. And outside/inside is basically still the way to go for me as well.

    I had to fix this issue a decade or so ago. Have a trainer tell me to slow my post really didn't work because I was jerky as much as quick.
    I was finally able to change when a coach said "calm your post".

    Another great thing I can chalk up to the hunters. : ) Calming the posting.
    http://kaboomeventing.com/
    http://kaboomeventing.blogspot.com/
    Horses are amazing athletes and make no mistake -- they are the stars of the show!



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jun. 13, 2001
    Location
    usa
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    Default

    Most riders THINK they are SUPPOSED to match the horse (follow it) rather than GUIDE the TEMPO. So when the horse starts to quicken/lower/take shorter strides/fall onto the forehand/close and lower and run, they do the same thing. They must be TOLD to SLOW/DOWN or post LOWER. A good way to do this is posting w/o stirrups if nothing else works. Also, it helps if the horse remains correctly up and open and then the horse are less likely to run.

    Posting HIGHER will cause the horse ideally to take LONGER strides, but NOT if they do not change their tempo.
    I.D.E.A. yoda



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Oct. 16, 2006
    Posts
    852

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ideayoda View Post
    Most riders THINK they are SUPPOSED to match the horse (follow it) rather than GUIDE the TEMPO. So when the horse starts to quicken/lower/take shorter strides/fall onto the forehand/close and lower and run, they do the same thing. They must be TOLD to SLOW/DOWN or post LOWER. A good way to do this is posting w/o stirrups if nothing else works. Also, it helps if the horse remains correctly up and open and then the horse are less likely to run.

    Posting HIGHER will cause the horse ideally to take LONGER strides, but NOT if they do not change their tempo.
    Yes, but WHY oh WHY do instructors let us trot around for YEARS without telling us this information.

    The first time I ever heard this I was happy to comply but felt like a moron that nobody had ever said it to me before.



  19. #19
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    Oct. 4, 2008
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    Default

    yes, I have noticed that the higher this particular rider gets, the more choppy she is, and the more choppy the horse is. We did take away stirrups. And a good friend of ours suggested she remember to tighten core muscles and do it SLOWLY. That major helped.

    I really appreciate all the wonderful suggestions. The counting thing didn't work so well. She can count fast. Grin.
    May the sun shine on you daily, and your worries be gone with the wind.
    www.mmceventing.com



  20. #20
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    Nov. 5, 2011
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    Wish I knew, but the journey is interesting
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    Default

    Two things:

    Counting the two-beat out aloud. The person on the ground to start, because they can see the stride, and then the rider to do it, loudly, once they can feel it. Then get the rider to speed up and slow down the count and so feel how the horse also speeds up and slows down in response. Bit of magic that. (Counting aloud is also a great way to calm self and horse when horse is a bit bouncy.)

    Visualise your hips as wheels, circling around. A bigger circle means a slower trot. Remember, two wheels, two hips, so you can also work them individually which is a good exercise to open your riding hips. From experience, this is a good exercise to practice when walking around as well as on the horse.



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