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  1. #1
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    Aug. 25, 2001
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    Texas and Illinois U.S.
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    Smile Shagya Jump Start program to end soon!

    Do you have a purebred Arabian mare that you would like to breed
    this year? Breed to a purebred Shagya stallion and produce an endurance
    prospect with more substantial bone and calmer temperament!
    These two traits can almost be guaranteed and depending upon your
    mare, conformation will also be enhanced.

    The French use the Shagya to produce their FEI horses -- one of the
    best kept secrets in the horse world! Many of the horses in their pedigrees
    are labeled AA, but technically are Anglo Shagya, as they allow Shagya
    in AA stud books.

    The ASAV Jump Start allows you to breed to a select few Shagya
    stallions for ONLY $400. The fee will never be lower then this!
    Stallions include imported bloodlines including an *Oman son.

    Go to www.shagyaregistry.com and download the 2011 Jump Start booklet
    and choose a stallion before they are sold.

    Some of these stallions are actively competing. One is the sire of a
    gelding that will have 2000 endurance miles at the end of this year.
    Once you have competed upon a Shagya, you will be an enthusiast, as
    their personality and temperament REALLY ARE DIFFERENT!
    Last edited by LCR; Jun. 8, 2011 at 01:55 PM. Reason: Mares from any breed are welcome. The Shagya is accepted into a majority of warm blood stud books



  2. #2
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    Jun. 11, 2004
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LCR View Post


    The ASAV Jump Start allows you to breed to a select few Shagya
    stallions for ONLY $200. The fee will never be lower then this!

    The website says $400 stud fee. Which is it?



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2001
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    Texas and Illinois U.S.
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    Default

    You are correct--it is $400. Somehow I hit the wrong key!

    Thanks for catching this. It is still a great deal, as some of these
    stallion normally stand for twice that fee.

    If you have a purebred Arabian mare and breed to some of the
    import stallions, the foal could be registered as a PB Shagya, because
    of a percentage rule. Almost all the imported stallions do not have
    pb OX back until 5th or 6th generation.

    If you love the Arabian breeds and have curtailed breeding because of the
    market, this is a great time to begin a purebred Shagya breeding program.
    They are still very rare and the demand is increasing, as many of them are
    just beginning to become seasoned endurance mounts.



  4. #4
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    Jul. 17, 2009
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    Default

    Wasn't there a couple of cruelty seizures of Shagyas recently? I think one of the worst things that can happen to a breed is for it to be declared rare and/or speyshul. Every whackjob on the planet will soon be breeding to beat the band so they can make more (insert rare/speyshul breed here) to make millions.
    "My biggest fear is that when I die my husband is going to try to sell all my horses and tack for what I told him they cost."



  5. #5
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    Jan. 23, 2007
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    Hampshire, IL
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    Default

    If you actually do any research on the Shagya you'll find it is indeed a special breed and for all the right reasons: tough, sturdy, great temperament.

    They are bred for performance NOT color or looks.

    In addition they are approved out crosses for many important warm blood breeds, Trakehners for example. Windfall has a Shagya in his direct ancestry.



  6. #6
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    Nov. 1, 2009
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    552

    Default

    Yes, they are special. Unfortunate circumstances can happen to anyone that owns any breed. Someone's financial situation has nothing to do with how great this breed is, so go troll somewhere else PRS!



  7. #7
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    Mar. 3, 2010
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    Georgia
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    I've heard nothing but good things about Shagyas. They seem to be the last refuge when it comes to old style Arabs. Even Crabbets seem to be losing their Arabian virtues to fashion these days. My girl is old timey Polish. Unfortunately, the emphasis here is on old.
    "Rock n' roll's not through, yeah, I'm sewing wings on this thing." --Destroyer
    http://dressagescriblog.wordpress.com/



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov. 25, 2005
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    Golden, Colorado
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    Default

    Of course I WOULD see this two days after buying a purebred Arabian mare.

    IamnotabreederIdonotneedafoalIamnotabreederIdonotn eedafoal... now to write that on the chalkboard 50 times...
    "The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated." - Gandhi

    -my gelding is a ho clique-



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul. 17, 2009
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    south eastern US
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by howardh View Post
    Yes, they are special. Unfortunate circumstances can happen to anyone that owns any breed. Someone's financial situation has nothing to do with how great this breed is, so go troll somewhere else PRS!
    My comment wasn't against the Shagya or any particular breed for that matter. History has shown that as soon as you declare something rare or special whackjobs come out of the woodwork to make more of them so they can make a zillion dollars on the rare and special. Legitimate, responsible breeders...breed on. And YES financial problems can happen to anybody BUT responsible people stop breeding and start downsizing their herds before the money problems get so bad that they cannot adequately take care of their animals. I've lost count of how many breeding farms I've read about recently that have herds of emaciated, dying horses because they wouldn't stop breeding and wouldn't downsize because they couldn't sell their rare, special but emaciated and worm riddled horses for what they thought they were worth. A recent one was Shagyas, which btw, is the first I've ever even heard of the breed which is very sad IMHO. It's unfortunate that the more rare and/or special something is the more it can attract the whackadoos. That's all I meant.
    "My biggest fear is that when I die my husband is going to try to sell all my horses and tack for what I told him they cost."



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2001
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    Texas and Illinois U.S.
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    Default

    I agree with you about labeling a breed RARE, in order to justify breeding, but in the case of the Shagya breed which originated in 1789 in my opinion there is
    a good reason to widen the gene pool.

    After WWII after a century and more of extremely careful breeding to develop
    and enhance an Arabian breed, the breed was down to less then 300 breeding horses.

    Fortunately some Europeans with fairly deep pockets, made it their mission to
    save family strains within the breed. One man collected about 25-30 stallions and mares, as did others, maybe not to this extent, but enough to insure that the gene pool was diversified. Stud farms in Romania and Poland saved individuals and continued their national stud farms

    The Babolna stud farm was also under Russian rule and luckily because of some Hungarians who had a passion for these horses, the herd was not harmed to the point that it could not come back. Politics have no place in the horse world and Babolna is still fighting for survival. At the present time the farm is seen as desirable for a tourist attraction, but it's future is uncertain over the long haul.

    Here in the U.S. we are fortunate to have 5-6 imported stallions. Most of these are all Shagya back several generations. When crossed with the purebred Arabian mares, because of the percentage of Shagya blood in the fourth generation, they can be registered as purebred Shagya. There are also some very nice domestic stallions available.

    This breed is very versatile and it doesn't seem there is anything they cannot do and usually, do well! They are the perfect family horse, because of how quiet they are, how they bond to their humans, and how athletic they are. You can go out and do well in endurance and a few weekends later, be at a hunter/jumper show or dressage or even do reining.

    The passion continues to this day and it is the direct result of the Shagya and
    their ability to charm and prove themselves with their owners. Once you own one, that will make you a believer!



  11. #11
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    Nov. 1, 2009
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    552

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    Well, I think it is a pretty broad statement that a rare breed attracts wackadoos. I can show you hundreds of AQHA breeders that probably should not be breeding and tons of breeders in every breed that you may consider a wackadoo.

    Times are tough and bad things can happen to anyone, not just rare breed breeders!

    Shagyas have been kept going by dedicated breeders across the world, thank goodness.

    This is a rare and really special breed. They are great ALL around horses that have great feet and minds and certainly a breed that I would like to see expanded so there is more selection for buyers. I am not a breeder, but I would rather see more Shagya breeders than more AQHA breeders added to the market!

    Shagyas were very selectively bred and culled for years and have not fallen prey to the specialization within breeds registries that seems so common now. When I shop for a Shagya there are consistent highly desirable traits that I know will be there.

    These horses were bred to be tough. I wish more registries had paid attention to things that really do matter but seem to have been lost in search of a certain look for show. Like good feet...



  12. #12
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    Jul. 17, 2009
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by howardh View Post
    Well, I think it is a pretty broad statement that a rare breed attracts wackadoos. I can show you hundreds of AQHA breeders that probably should not be breeding and tons of breeders in every breed that you may consider a wackadoo.

    Times are tough and bad things can happen to anyone, not just rare breed breeders!

    Shagyas have been kept going by dedicated breeders across the world, thank goodness.

    This is a rare and really special breed. They are great ALL around horses that have great feet and minds and certainly a breed that I would like to see expanded so there is more selection for buyers. I am not a breeder, but I would rather see more Shagya breeders than more AQHA breeders added to the market!

    Shagyas were very selectively bred and culled for years and have not fallen prey to the specialization within breeds registries that seems so common now. When I shop for a Shagya there are consistent highly desirable traits that I know will be there.

    These horses were bred to be tough. I wish more registries had paid attention to things that really do matter but seem to have been lost in search of a certain look for show. Like good feet...
    I disagree, rare breeds do attract whackadoos who think they can get rich quick. Obviously, not every one who breeds rare breeds are whacked but then the responsible breeders aren't the ones making the news are they? The horse world is absolutely brimming with crazies anyhow . As you say, the problem goes way deeper than those that are just breeding rare horses. AQHA is a great example...BUT it won't stop unless the judges quit rewarding the beefy muscularture and teeny tiny feet in the show ring. As long as those things are getting rewarded then they will keep getting bred. The arabians are going the way of the quarter horses...by taking something that is special to the breed and breeding to exagerate it to the point of being grotesque. I've seen arabs being shown with extreme dish faces that make them look deformed but they get rewarded with blue ribbon. (this is an extreme example) http://kakagiarabians.com/namusca.htm I have no argument with responsible breeders who are honestly trying to improve their breed or at least maintain the things about the breed that make it special. However, I do have a problem with folks breeding more than they can care for with no emergency financial plan which puts the horses in danger. I love horses...all horses not just a particular breed. However I only own 3 horses and two of them are retired or semi retired seniors. Why? Because that is all I can comfortably afford to keep. I "could" keep more but then I would be struggling financially and that puts everything I have in danger. It saddens me to see folks who, with all good intentions towards their animals, get in too deep and end up stuggling. It happens, but they should have an exit plan.
    "My biggest fear is that when I die my husband is going to try to sell all my horses and tack for what I told him they cost."



  13. #13
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    Nov. 1, 2009
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    Do you own a Shagya? Have you ever tried to buy one? There are not that many breeders and from what I have seen none of them are in it to get rich quickly. They seem to love the breed and are trying hard to promote it and get the word out and put years of effort into breeding quality horses without a huge financial windfall. Shagyas (thank god for those of us who want to buy one) don't sell for 50k or even 20K!

    Unfortunate things happen to us all and often are beyond our control. A horrible illness is certainly something that one cannot control, and no matter how much one plans, if a disaster strikes any one of us could be left in a bad situation, even with all contingency plans in place. Sad but true.

    So life is short. Too short to not own a Shagya! I rode mine on trails all weekend and now we are heading out for a jumping lesson! Thank you Shagya breeders for keeping this very versatile horse going! I have owned lots of breeds in my horsey life but I will never own another now that I have found Shagyas!



  14. #14
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    Oct. 10, 2007
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    Denmark
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    Quote Originally Posted by PRS View Post
    I disagree, rare breeds do attract whackadoos who think they can get rich quick.
    Anyone who thinks they can get rich quick breeding horses is per definition a whackadoo, regardless of the chosen breed.



  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ozalynda View Post
    Anyone who thinks they can get rich quick breeding horses is per definition a whackadoo, regardless of the chosen breed.
    Precisely my point
    "My biggest fear is that when I die my husband is going to try to sell all my horses and tack for what I told him they cost."



  16. #16
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    Jan. 23, 2007
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    Thumbs down

    I think it's pretty whackadoo that this innocent thread about a pretty nice offer for breeding has been hijacked in this manner.

    shameful.



  17. #17
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    Thumbs up

    Historically, the Shagya-Arabian was bred in the Austro-Hungarian Empire, specifically in the main military stud farms of Bàbolna, Radautz and Piber in Hungary. Later on, stud farms in Czechoslovakia, Romania, and Bulgaria also bred Shagya-Arabians. The Shagya-Arabians not only served as cavalry horses, they were also used as parade horses for European royalty. Every royal guard or officer regarded it a privilege to be able to ride a Shagya. The Imperial guards of the Habsburgs in Vienna were always mounted on elegant Shagya-Arabians, and the Royal Guard of Budapest rode the Shagya-Arabian.

    The breed was nearly wiped out during WWII, along with the Lipizzaner, but one can still admire many statues in Hungary commemorating the heroic deeds of these horses and their riders. Currently, all Shagya-Arabian breeding world-wide is overseen by the Internationale Shagya-Araber Gesellschaft e.v. ( ISG) and horses must be approved before being used as breeding stock. In 2000, the total number of Shagya mares was estimated at approximately 1,500 horses world-wide.

    In the United States, the Shagya-Arabian faced a dramatic birth by Adele Furby in Montana. In 1984, Ms. Furby rescued a Shagya-Arabian stallion named Bravo from the estate of a Hungarian Countess who had stipulated in her will that 22 of her favorite horses were to be destroyed upon her death so as to not fall into the wrong hands, and Bravo was on that list. His paternal grand sire, GAZAL II, was considered the "Shagya Stallion of the Century" in Europe and his son, GAZAL VII, was pictured on the cover of a studbook. After correspondence with ISG and some pedigree research, the ISG named Bravo as the foundation stallion for the United States Shagya-Arabian breeding program and in 1986, Ms. Furby started the North American Shagya Society (NASS) to help recover the rare Shagya-Arabian breed from near extinction. NASS is recognized by the ISG as the only North American registry for Shagya-Arabians. Its registry is referred to as the Shagya-Arabian Registry of North America (SHARONA) and purebred Shagya-Arabians registered with SHARONA are eligible to be branded with a patented brand showing the letters SH inside a circular 6-pointed sun.

    After a visit to Europe, three Shagya-Arabian mares, and two young stallions were purchased by Adele Furby for import to America in 1987 and those horses, along with 8 purebred Arabian mares that she had selected in America became the foundation for the purebred Shagya-Arabian breeding program in the United States on the largest and oldest Shagya-Arabian breeding farm in America.

    However, the Shagya-Arabian has been rather slow to establish itself in the U.S. Following several new imports since 2001, the breed is finally producing more quality horses and the Shagya-Arabian is rapidly finding new interest and new breeders. What started out as only a handful is now an amazing number of Shagya-Arabians that are doing well in the sport horse world. In 2002, three Shagya-Arabian stallions were imported from Europe as valuable new genetic material for the American Sport Horse breeder who would prefer not to use the purebred Arabian for crossbreeding. The Shagya breed is still very rare and fewer than 250 horses exist in the U.S. as of 2008 with only 25 of these being approved stallions.

    Those people familiar with Arabian horses who see the Shagya-Arabian for the first time are often not prepared to see a large, very robust, oriental-based horse with swinging gaits and a quiet, calm nature. Shagya-Arabians are taller, have a larger rectangular frame, are stronger and possess better riding horse qualities than purebred Arabians. The Shagya-Arabians combine the advantages of the Bedouin Arabian; elegance, hardiness, endurance, and inborn friendliness toward humans, with the requirements of the modern riding horse; sufficient height, excellent movement and enormous jumping ability.

    http://www.shagya.net/images/The%20M...an%20Horse.pdf



  18. #18
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    Dec. 29, 2010
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    Webmistress: A wonderful concise history on Shagya origins in North America..thank you !

    Our family did have a very interesting trip to Europe last summer and visited many of these places significant in Shagya history. Piber, in Austria, is now exclusively breeding Lipizzaners, mainly for the Spanish Riding School in Vienna. Lipica, now part of Slovenia, also continues the Lipizzaner lines. However we did get to see Shagyas at Babolna in Hungary and Topolcianky in Slovakia. Possibly next time we can include Radautz in Romania and Kabiuk in Bulgaria. All super countries with great food and wine ! Germany and other European countries have excellent private studs. The private website www.moellgaard.dk lists an amazing number of links for this breed !

    Further to this posting indicating the foundation registry NASS there are now two additional Shagya registries in North America - ASAV is the American Shagya Arabian Verband and PShR is the Performance Shagya Registry. All three have websites with a lot of content and great photos for anyone interested in this beautiful, sound and athletic breed.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Sep. 22, 2002
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    Verona,KY USA
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    I usually lurk but would like to reply to this interesting thread. I am a Shagya breeder and stand a Shagya stallion. He has produced many endurance winning horses crossed with Thoroughbred and with Arabian mares. The disposition, and metabolics come through in the foal of my stallion and in all of the crosses to Shagya stallions. The Hungarian Hussars needed a horse to go 50 miles some days, and 25 miles the next. The Shagya breed was selectively bred to fill this need. We don't have a need for a fighting calvary in modern times but the sport of endurance racing can sure use these horses.



  20. #20
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    Jan. 23, 2007
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    Agree! :-) I'd love to have one myself and may someday, pending retirement/expiration of some of my herd. Sad but true, I have too many horses ...



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