The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb. 13, 2006
    Posts
    1,523

    Default definition of "rideability" for stallion tests

    Hi,

    When riders judge horses on rideability for stallion tests (and other performance tests I suppose), are there formal criteria that they are given? Is rideability the idea that "anyone can ride" the horse or could say, a very hot horse that is willing and quick to learn get a high rideability score? Does a high rideability score translate into a horse that amateurs can ride?

    thanks!
    http://behindthebitblog.com
    Dressage, riding, sport horse blog
    BTBbrowbands.com
    Unique browbands for dressage and hunter riders



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 1999
    Location
    Cypress, near Houston, Texas
    Posts
    8,578

    Default

    From speaking with lots of training riders, inspectors and training directos over my years of attending the stallion testings, I have come to understand that when they judge rideability they are looking to see how willing and cooperative is the horse, whether he can adjust to different riding styles and whether he focuses on his rider's aids and responds to the best of his ability.

    So, I'd say a good rideability score is one indicator that a horse would be rideable by an amateur - but remember that whether the average U.S. amateur can ride a horse has just as much to do with the extravagence of the horse's gaits and his "hotness" as with his rideability scores.
    Visit Sonesta Farms website at www.sonestafarms.com or our FaceBook page at www.facebook.com/sonestafarms. Also showing & breeding Cavalier King Charles Spaniels.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 17, 2002
    Location
    Redlands, CA
    Posts
    7,773

    Default

    The test riders are not amateurs.

    Could an average American rider do well on what a test rider thinks has high rideability?

    It depends.

    Typically the average amateur wants huge gaits, the auction trot.

    I get my best feedback, as a breeder, if an amateur has an upper level trainer who is familiar with youngsters.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct. 5, 2003
    Location
    Oklahoma
    Posts
    7,412

    Default

    This is not a test of rideability to determine if the stallion is an amateur ride but rather if he is suitable for sport. The riders give their score based on their "feeling". Is the jumper brave and does he take them to the jump? Does he feel scopey? Does he learn from his mistakes? In the dressage phase, is he submissive and responsive to the aids? Does he feel elastic and scopey in his gaits? It is questions such as these, that are most important.
    Silver Creek Farms - home of Apiro & Validation
    Visit us on facebook!



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 13, 2006
    Posts
    1,523

    Default scopey / suppleness / elasticity

    Hi,

    Hmm. I thought I was getting it, or at least part of it. Rideable horses are willing, fast learners, able to focus, non-resistant, and enjoy their job (which they'll do if they find it easy).

    The last poster emphasized this last point -- athletic horses find their job easy. So it seems like rideability has overlap with sheer ability -- scopey, supple, elastic, etc.

    Is this true? Are riders given specific instructions on how to assess their horses?
    http://behindthebitblog.com
    Dressage, riding, sport horse blog
    BTBbrowbands.com
    Unique browbands for dressage and hunter riders



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct. 5, 2003
    Location
    Oklahoma
    Posts
    7,412

    Default

    Absolutely. Yes, the riders who have not been a test rider before have a meeting with the training director so that they know what attributes are considered when giving the score.

    The horses are not scored down for green-ness. They are not expected to be perfect. If they have a naughty moment, that is okay as long as they get right back to work. Sometimes a horse may look difficult, but the rider have a totally different opinion.
    Silver Creek Farms - home of Apiro & Validation
    Visit us on facebook!



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct. 29, 1999
    Posts
    14,409

    Default

    Rideability for most amateurs means a less reactive horse. That is not a good think for a top level horse, competitive horse, which is what the registries are trying to create..



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb. 13, 2006
    Posts
    1,523

    Default fly on the wall

    I'd love to be a fly on the wall to hear what the trainers tell the riders. I'm probably making it seem more complicated than it is, but the notion of rideability strikes me as an important one to understand when you're looking at stallions to breed horses for a particular market...
    http://behindthebitblog.com
    Dressage, riding, sport horse blog
    BTBbrowbands.com
    Unique browbands for dressage and hunter riders



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct. 5, 2003
    Location
    Oklahoma
    Posts
    7,412

    Default

    Harald Hoffmann, the training director, tells them to score their "feeling". They may talk a bit about the scoring scale, but it is pretty basic. The riders are all experienced with taking young horses up through the ranks, so they know what to look for.
    Silver Creek Farms - home of Apiro & Validation
    Visit us on facebook!



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar. 1, 2007
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    4,150

    Default

    In the dressage phase, is he submissive and responsive to the aids? Does he feel elastic and scopey in his gaits? It is questions such as these, that are most important.

    Yes. My SO has been a test rider for quite a few inspections ect. He judges how well the horse is suited for the sport it is bred for. As was mentioned above, is the horse submissive (in general, to the hand ect)?. Is he good through the back(BIG ONE). Is he elastic in his gaits? Does he give the rider a good feeling? Does he have the right reactions?. These are the things that the dressage rider wants in a competative prospect. These are the traits that make a horse more likely to reach the upper levels of the sport. And they are heritable, hence the reason they are judged.

    Quiet and non reactive ie anyone can ride are not important qualities in a dressage horse. (Obviously you don't want an overly looky or totally crazy reactive horse either).

    At the same time, I do think it worth mentioning that if the horse does not have enough training, it makes it really hard to judge the rideability. Some people take their horses to the inspections too green and so it is impossible for the rider to give the horse a good score on submission for example...



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct. 5, 2003
    Location
    Oklahoma
    Posts
    7,412

    Default

    I agree. On the other side of the coin, it is also difficult to judge a trained horse that has man made issues.

    Quote Originally Posted by Donella View Post
    [B]At the same time, I do think it worth mentioning that if the horse does not have enough training, it makes it really hard to judge the rideability. Some people take their horses to the inspections too green and so it is impossible for the rider to give the horse a good score on submission for example...
    Silver Creek Farms - home of Apiro & Validation
    Visit us on facebook!



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb. 7, 2002
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    805

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Donella View Post
    At the same time, I do think it worth mentioning that if the horse does not have enough training, it makes it really hard to judge the rideability. Some people take their horses to the inspections too green and so it is impossible for the rider to give the horse a good score on submission for example...
    So true.
    Sentinel Hill Farm
    Home of VDL Windsor H



Similar Threads

  1. Another interesting "hot young stallion" vs "proven older stallion" tidbit
    By Hillside H Ranch in forum Sport Horse Breeding
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: Nov. 18, 2013, 05:39 PM
  2. Whats YOUR definition of "light work" for youngsters?
    By Ridewithnopride in forum Off Course
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: Nov. 22, 2011, 02:30 AM
  3. "tests on tape"- downloadable audio tests?
    By lddowler in forum Dressage
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: Sep. 6, 2011, 09:21 AM
  4. Your Definition of "Starting under Saddle"
    By Dalemma in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: Feb. 28, 2010, 06:42 AM
  5. Definition of "Dangerous Riding"? (for english paper)
    By Milocalwinnings in forum Eventing
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: Oct. 21, 2009, 05:52 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •