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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 15, 2008
    Location
    Charleston area - SC
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    650

    Default Help! Is this Anhidrosis?

    Hi everyone,

    Before I go into details, my horse IS currently being seen by two vets at our normal clinic, and I've also spoken with another one from another local clinic on this.

    Wednesday evening I went out to the barn to find my horse calling and calling for me, lethargic, and running a high fever of 105.8. Most of the other horses around were sweating, but mine was not. NO heaving, whatsoever.

    We called the vet, and he had us cold hose and give banamine. Within 30 minutes, the fever started coming down, but my horse is still SUPER lethargic and tired. Appetite OK. The vet said this is anhidrosis and that it could take weeks to months for him to be able to regulate his temperature again. He advised me to put him on ONE AC and give him 1 bottle of beer with both AM & PM meals.

    The following morning, Thursday (after he'd spent the night in a cool barn), his fever came back with a vengence again, spiking up to 105.8 before the banamine kicked in (we gave it at 103 & immediately started cold hosing, which also make him shiver violently). 8 hours later, same thing. We seemed ineffective in bringing his temps down with alcohol baths, or ice on the jugular. In my opinion, the only thing helping the fever is the banamine.

    Friday, we had beautifully cool weather (in the 80's only during the day), same thing, plus laying down on the floor, looking almost colicy - so we took him into the vet clinic for COLD fluids and to start the ACTH shot set.

    Saturday - Same recurring fever when the banamine wore off, so I called my vet AGAIN wanting to verify that this really was anhidrosis. My vets said this recurring fever WAS typical, and he wasn't worried. The one I spoke with from the other clinic said she did not think this was anhidrosis, and she would do blood work. I spoke with the second vet at our normal clinic (Who was actually the one on call Saturday), and he said this could possibly also be coming from a virus or infection, so we put him on broad spectrum antibiotics as well as Gastroguard since he's been on the Banamine every 8-12 hours since Wednesday.

    Since having the ACTH shots and starting antibiotics, his fever doesn't seem to go up past 102/103ish. We are still using Banamine/Bute to keep it down. We are also still using the Gastroguard, ONE AC and beer.

    He is still exhuasted looking, and seems depressed at times. Does not want to move past a walk (and he's an ARAB! :-P) Still not sure if he's sweating since it's not been hot enough outside for him to, NOR have we really given him a chance as we're told to keep him as cold as possible.

    I can't find enough information on the internet to make me happy, so I just need to know if this sounds like anihidrosis that any of you all have experienced? My horsey friends who have had horses with anhidrosis have not experienced the recurring high temps in such mild weather as we're having.

    TIA!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2004
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    Baltimore, MD
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    Default

    It could be but I am not 100% convinced. It doesn't sound like a typical case to me. If I were guessing I would go with virus. FYI I find most horses respond better to Let M Sweat than One AC. I hope your horse is better soon.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    May. 20, 2009
    Posts
    492

    Default

    This does not sound like it in MY experience, there is plenty of heaving,
    to bring the temperature that high I had to lunge in the sun.
    Waterhose would bring down the rapid breathing, I did not have to scrape, put him in front of fan, never any shivering, night time was the worst,
    I had to rinse every hour, never any exhaustion,
    I hope he feels better now.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2004
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    Baltimore, MD
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    Default

    I think the key fact that stands out to me is you saying that hosing and alcohol baths do not help and only banamine will bring his fever down. The hosing and the alcohol baths are effectively taking the place of sweating which means if he were sweating he would still have the same problem right?



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun. 15, 2008
    Location
    Charleston area - SC
    Posts
    650

    Default

    Thanks Everyone!

    I appreciate the input. So now, after being on antibiotics for two days, Banamine every 11 - 12 hours, finishing the ACTH shot set, and using beer and One AC, his temp is not increasing dramatically any more.

    Just to restate, it's MY opinion that it's the banamine working to bring the fever down. Mainly because we have been logging like crazy and can see a pattern. My vet has told me that he is not so sure that it's the banamine - and he thinks that the cold hosing and alcohol baths should be working. I just am not seeing it that way. I also have given him banamine w/o cold hosing (basically 'cause I'm tired of seeing him shake violently -- this stopped Friday-ish), and the temp went down still. He has ALWAYS been sensitive to cold water (even in fall, he is the biggest wimp, and will come in sore if he was out in rain under 60 degrees).

    In my logging I found previously the banamine would work for 8 hours, and then the fever would spike quickly and predictibly. As we progressed, the fever started slowly rising after 8. Then slowly rising after 10 hours etc...NOW, he seems to have some MILD temp raising, but not at 8 hours, more like 11ish. Tonight, we waited for 12 hours before giving the banamine to see, and his temp was 100.5 - 100.8 while being outside and grazing. He was still "sore" looking and tired, but wanted to graze and be outside with the other horses.

    He has NO inclination to trot (which is not normally like him - he is a FIT 5 year old Arabian I've been training for dressage and eventing). He normally gallops on his own EVERY day. And if I jog next to him, he ALWAYS picks up a trot. Now, even when the fever is gone, he is still exhausted and looks sore.

    So could his body be getting back to normal after all the treatment for the anhidrosis? Could the antibiotics (2 scoops of Uniprim once/day) be working after only 2 doses already? Or could it be a virus that's just working out?? I have no clue... :-\ But it seems like it's getting better, right??

    Thanks again!



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep. 12, 2005
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    3,763

    Default

    Fever without panting sounds more like an illness than anhidrosis to me.

    And I believe there is an easy, fairly definitive test for anhidrosis, which could have been done right away if your vet suspected that was the problem was.

    I think I'd be looking for a new vet.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 22, 2006
    Posts
    2,124

    Default

    I am not saying it couldn't be, because my horse is a mild non-sweater and I have not dealt with a severe case before, just mild ones. In my case my horse was often not sweating enough or if indirect sunlight didn't always sweat, more like if he got hot too fast he wouldn't sweat. Also he panted a lot!

    Your horse sounds way more serious regardless of what is wrong. Also in my experience One AC would NOT be working yet, it takes awhile. I don't have any ideas, but I hope you guys get it figured out soon!



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug. 8, 2001
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    up the hill from the little river (that floods alarmingly often)
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    Default

    I think if I were in your shoes, I would want to rule out tick-borne illnesses. I know ehrlichiosis/anaplasmosis presents with a very high fever, but I didn't think anhydrosis was also involved.

    I think you are right ... there is something else going on here. Doing some more bloodwork is a good place to start. And if you cannot keep him cool with relatively normal vital signs, it is time to take him to a clinic where he can get more advanced care—not implying you aren't taking good care of him, but you can only do so much in a nonclinical setting.

    The one time I had to deal with anhydrosis was in early July, as a side effect of Tri-Hist. Cold hosing, discontinuing the Tri-Hist and a few pints of Guiness with some beet pulp took care of things and my mare was back to normal within days. But when we found her she was not sweating, had a low fever and a very high respiration rate (over 100).

    Good luck. I hope you figure out what this is soon!
    Full-time bargain hunter.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr. 17, 2002
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    between the barn and the pond
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    Default

    I think you need a new vet. Yesterday.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec. 27, 2001
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    Washington, DC
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    Default

    I have had experience with two horses who had anhidrosis and another one who literally had his first onset in front of me.
    For what that's worth, none behaved like this; they all had trouble regulating their temps, but from a clear cause (that is, it was very hot and/or they had been exercising), and they panted like dogs because they were not sweating.

    Standard ways of cooling them down worked just fine -- you just needed to be more aggressive about it than with a normal horse (one who really had a bad episode we iced his poll and his jugular, and he got acupuncture which really helped).

    The one who had his first onset was competing on a very hot day. His rider cooled him out as per normal and then I found him (we were trailering together) a few minutes later heating back up, but dry, and panting. Again, he did respond to aggressive cooling. The vet at the show said she'd let him run cross country if his temp came back to normal. I thought this was a terrible idea given the experience I had with other anhydritic horses, but the owner did it anyway.

    Horse has been anhydritic ever since; now has to be managed very carefully.

    But in all cases the horses did not need drugs, but cooling, to feel better.
    The big man -- no longer an only child

    His new little brother



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan. 5, 2003
    Location
    New York/New Jersey
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    Default

    I think your horse has an actual fever.
    She wasn't running away with me, I just couldn't stop her!



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2008
    Location
    Florida
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    2,063

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by asterix View Post
    I have had experience with two horses who had anhidrosis and another one who literally had his first onset in front of me.
    For what that's worth, none behaved like this; they all had trouble regulating their temps, but from a clear cause (that is, it was very hot and/or they had been exercising), and they panted like dogs because they were not sweating.

    Standard ways of cooling them down worked just fine -- you just needed to be more aggressive about it than with a normal horse (one who really had a bad episode we iced his poll and his jugular, and he got acupuncture which really helped).

    The one who had his first onset was competing on a very hot day. His rider cooled him out as per normal and then I found him (we were trailering together) a few minutes later heating back up, but dry, and panting. Again, he did respond to aggressive cooling. The vet at the show said she'd let him run cross country if his temp came back to normal. I thought this was a terrible idea given the experience I had with other anhydritic horses, but the owner did it anyway.

    Horse has been anhydritic ever since; now has to be managed very carefully.

    But in all cases the horses did not need drugs, but cooling, to feel better.
    This is what anhydrosis usually looks like - panting and the fever is secondary to the overheating - it would likely go down if he were cooled without having to give him banamine. Having to give him banamine to bring his temperature down sure sounds like there some internal mechanism going on that's spiking his fever.

    They can test for anhydrosis by doing a dilute epinephrine skin injection that can tell you clearly whether that's involved - although he could be anhydric secondary to the infection unfortunately.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun. 15, 2008
    Location
    Charleston area - SC
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by thatmoody View Post
    - although he could be anhydric secondary to the infection unfortunately.
    This is what I'm thinking. After going all of yesterday without any signs of fever (although still on bute every 12 hours), this morning (80 + high humidity) he was blowing a little and temp back to 102.8. He was brought in under fans, and his temp immediately went down to 101.8. He seemed happy and ate all his breakfast. This is the first time I've seen the fans work to bring his temp down. After the blood was pulled (and I'm sure the bute kicked in, his temp was back to 100.7 (which it usually seems to stay around when he is feeling OK).

    The vet came out today to pull blood for cbc and fibrinogen as well as a ketotifen shot. We should have those results tomorrow AM...

    One vet thinks virus/infection...the other thinks it's still the anhidrosis that is just taking a while to get under control. :-\



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr. 1, 2003
    Location
    Cocoa, Fla
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    Default

    Beer, One AC, extra electrolytes didn't work

    LET-M-SWEAT worked, link:

    http://www.equi-fab.com/anhidrosis.htm

    Also heard Pro Sweat works, link:

    http://www.kvsupply.com/KVVet/produc...5F37886992E429
    Sandy in Fla.



  15. #15
    atk5 Guest

    Default Viris going around

    Here in Georgia there is a virus going around that has them running a temp, being lethargic, not eating and having some swelling in the back legs. Your horse's temp seems higher than the ones here have had, but he could have a worse case than I have seen. It lasts about 10 to 14 days.
    I have a horse with Anhidorsis and have done a lot of research on the subject. Your horse's symptoms don't match with anything I have seen.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Sep. 25, 2003
    Location
    Rochester, NY
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    1,079

    Default virus

    "Here in Georgia there is a virus going around that has them running a temp, being lethargic, not eating and having some swelling in the back legs. Your horse's temp seems higher than the ones here have had, but he could have a worse case than I have seen. It lasts about 10 to 14 days."

    That one's been going around up here in NY as well. My boy had it a couple of weeks ago and I would have sworn he was having heat stress, but the vet said she was pretty sure it was the virus. He didn't have much of the swelling in the back legs, but some of them have had legs that looked like stove pipes! He was lethargic and didn't want to eat-not even grass. When the "lawnmower" didn't want to eat, I knew something was up!
    ~~~~~*~*~*~*~*~
    “ride your own horse” from sayings for life.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jun. 15, 2008
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    Charleston area - SC
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    Default

    Blood work came back with the white cell count only slightly high - usually indicative of stress. Fibrinogen test was normal. Nothing really strange other than that he was very slightly anemic.

    I also had the vet do the anhidrosis test (epinephrine), but all that tests is his physical ability to sweat (not if his body can control his temperature). We found that he IS able to sweat, so that's a good thing.

    Basically he looks like he is feeling back to normal, and his bratty ways are returning! Not sure if he can sweat yet though, since we haven't really given him the chance... I guess just taking it easy and continuing the treatment for anhidrosis...



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