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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 7, 2008
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    56

    Cool Anyone riding w/an eventing "group" rather than an eventing "barn"?

    Is anyone else riding with a group of people who board together but don't have an eventing trainer?

    Our eventing trainer left our barn, which leaves us without a trainer. However, we do have a dressage trainer, and hunter/jumper trainers to work with and have another eventing trainer coming up twice a month to school us x-country. We are in the process of finding a trainer to meet us at shows to help and school us.

    Is anyone else doing this and did it work out? Right now we are sort of like fish out of water as we try to put this together. We don't even have a "name" we ride under anymore so we have to come up with something...

    I had no idea how much easier it was to ride with a trainer. I don't believe this facility has any plans to bring in a new eventing trainer especially since the facility caters more to dressage and hunters.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 13, 2008
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,655

    Default

    I ride in a group, from a large barn with several pleasure riders and a couple western peeps. Our coach does not own the facility, and she coaches at a number of barns in the area, though most of them dont event. She comes to our barn the most, since it has the largest number of students, 2-3 times a week in the winter and 4-5 times a week in the summer.

    Is there a way to get an event coach to come in once a week and give you all lessons? Make a day of it so the travel is not so bad?



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 19, 2005
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    11,908

    Default

    really...most of my eventing I was mostly on my own. Can't remember going to an event with "name" other than my own. Hell...I still go mostly by myself (if you don't count the dog). But find people I know when I get there....same as most everyone else I know.

    I picked my barns by the facility...not the trainer...most of the folks that I DO train with don't have space for my horses...well...at least that is what they tell me

    Sounds like you guys have a lot of instruction....multiple lessons. If you have an event trainer that is coming up twice a month for xc schooling...that should be enough time for them to be able to get to know you to guide you as to your schedule and conditioning.

    Educate your self some on your own as well...read books...and then ask questions. You will be fine....and may find that you enjoy some independence.
    Last edited by bornfreenowexpensive; Apr. 12, 2010 at 04:41 PM.
    ** The difference between genius and stupidity is genius has its limits. -- Albert Einstein **



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr. 20, 2009
    Posts
    334

    Default

    I'm with BFNE... other than my stints as a working student, I don't think I've gone to an event with a trainer since I was about 12. The barn I'm currently at, though, does have a number of other people who event, and it's nice to have company (the last barn I was at was great, but no one else there really evented). It's nice to have friends to travel to events with, rather than going solo, especially when I'm new to the area! It's a situation that works fine for me.

    I'm confused by what you mean about needing a "name to ride under"?



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 6, 2006
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    72

    Default

    Jesus Christ... how many trainers do you need... ride under your god given name.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec. 15, 2003
    Posts
    1,306

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Twentymetercircle View Post
    We don't even have a "name" we ride under anymore so we have to come up with something...
    What does this mean?



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov. 3, 2003
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    2,139

    Default

    Huh? I have never boarded at a barn that was an "eventing barn" (i.e. everyone trained with the same person, went to events together, had matching t-shirts, etc.) I have been at barns that are a mixture of dressage, h/j and event riders (with the occasional western rider thrown in). I have gotten to know a group of local eventers that I sometimes meet up with to school or at events, and I think that is the neat part of the eventing community. What I find so unappealing about the hunter riders is that they belong to "barns" and "trainers" and wouldn't dream of going to shows solo. Currently, at my barn we have a dressage trainer. She is not a big name, but will teach anyone at the barn that wants lessons. There is one other boarder that events (and one that aspires to). I try to organize enough people at my barn to get an eventing trainer to come to us and teach (which may happen about 1 x per month). I also trailer out to her. It works for all of us (except, we don't have matching t-shirts)



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 24, 2003
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    99

    Default

    Maybe it's just Texas, but all my eventer friends are so independent they have their own names on their shirts <G>...like "Team Last Name".
    For some reason I just can't bring myself to call me and hubby a farm or team, though technically, since we keep horses at home, I guess we are. I love that about the eventing community really, that it doesn't matter who a person rides with, most everyone is cheering for the individual. I pray trainers never become as important as they are in hunter jumper land, which is the reason I no longer show in that arena.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan. 8, 2007
    Location
    Ithaca, NY
    Posts
    552

    Default

    I have to start shipping to Rochester to ride with an event trainer. There are none, so far as I can tell, anywhere near me. So what do you do?
    As they say in my hometown (not current town): "Cowboy Up!"
    ~T3DE 2010 Pact Clique~



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr. 12, 2004
    Location
    new england
    Posts
    321

    Default

    another loner here.... I have always evented alone and signed my own name on the back of the entry... I board my horses at home and truck off to a dressage trainer weekly and a H/J trainer every other week. Once I get to the events, I find I generally compete with the same group of people so there are plenty of familiar faces and I always leave with a new friend or two . I honestly don't think I have ever had a trainer at an event with me....



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2002
    Location
    Azle, Teh-has
    Posts
    7,592

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    Quote Originally Posted by MattMan View Post
    Jesus Christ... how many trainers do you need... ride under your god given name.
    OMG Matt, LMAO.
    Oh, BTW, raising hand. 30 years old a single here.


    You'll be fine going without a known "barn affiliation" or "trainer affiliation".
    Personally I feel that those paying for a coach at a show are throwing away their hard earned pennies. If you can't walk, trot, canter and jump your horse by yourself well then....
    And an added bonus here in Area 5 is that we don't have to worry about warm ups because Mike Huber is always there to set 4' oxars for the training warm up. ; )

    If you are a kid, or like me--who can't count or read, you may need to pay for a coach or babysitter.

    You guys will be fine. Just take a beer cooler. : ) And have fun.
    http://kaboomeventing.com/
    http://kaboomeventing.blogspot.com/
    Horses are amazing athletes and make no mistake -- they are the stars of the show!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun. 30, 2006
    Location
    SF Bay Area, California
    Posts
    4,090

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MattMan View Post
    Jesus Christ... how many trainers do you need... ride under your god given name.
    I happen to know the group of riders the OP rides with. It consists of young riders under the age of 15 and adult riders who are mostly going BN/N. The most advanced may go training this year. There is not much experience in this group so I can understand why this topic came up.
    Proud owner of a Slaughter-Bound TB from a feedlot, and her surprise baby...!
    http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e350/Jen4USC/fave.jpg
    http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e3...SC/running.jpg



  13. #13
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    Jan. 19, 2005
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    PA
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    Quote Originally Posted by jenm View Post
    I happen to know the group of riders the OP rides with. It consists of young riders under the age of 15 and adult riders who are mostly going BN/N. The most advanced may go training this year. There is not much experience in this group so I can understand why this topic came up.

    oh I can understand how it came up...but they should still be fine. Especially since there is someone who understands eventing (the instructor coming to school them with xc a couple times a month I would expect) coming to the barn.

    Bottom line....you are the only one out there competing. It is great for a rider to be some what on their own as long as they can be HONEST with themselves...and set realistic goals...and take the time to be prepared.

    Know your comfort level, pick reasonable goals, set a reasonable schedule obtain those goals...then discuss your goals and schedule with that coach/trainer to make sure they are reasonable.

    You don't need someone there to warm you up....but do discuss with your trainers HOW to warm yourself up. It is a skill that you do develop....and is important to know.

    And all the friends at the barn can still go to the events together as friends...and help each other out. You do not need to be riding at a high level to do this. Just take the time to prepar yourself...ask questions...and remember to have fun. And if you want to all go under "name" or have a group name...go ahead. But you don't need one...and most do not.

    It is a bit harder to do on your own....but fun as well...and in the end, IMO, you will be a better competitor.
    Last edited by bornfreenowexpensive; Apr. 12, 2010 at 06:43 PM.
    ** The difference between genius and stupidity is genius has its limits. -- Albert Einstein **



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct. 17, 2009
    Location
    Unionville
    Posts
    1,071

    Default

    OK, I'm going to take a potentially unpopular stance here:

    I come from a H/J background and did some foxhunting as well, but when I switched to eventing, the biggest hurdle for me (AND my horse) was going out on x-c alone. I know that there is not a lot of difference to some people, but there were lots of things that made me a bit of a head case when I first started eventing. I was totally capable, but I needed someone to warm me up to help me relax, have a couple nice jumps, reassure me and calm me down. I know that doing that on my own is a great goal, but at the time I really needed the extra support. I still made it around the x-c just fine all by myself! But, I credit that in part to having someone get my head in the game before the fact by reminding me to stop checking the horse to the fence, to look up, to breathe, etc.

    At one point, I was barding at a farm without a trainer at all and shipped out for lessons. I was great at working on things on my own at home (I was consistently told how vast the improvements were between lessons) but when I get to show I turn into a bit of a ninny and need some hand holding. I grew up having a trainer with me at horse shows and, until I feel ready to go solo, I feel like the coaching fee is WELL worth it for me.

    OP: If you want to ride under a group name, go for it! If you want a trainer to meet you at shows, go for it! It's all about having fun and you know what you need in order to do so.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals" Immanuel Kant



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2002
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    Azle, Teh-has
    Posts
    7,592

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by VicariousRider View Post
    OK,
    I come from a H/J background and did some foxhunting as well, but when I switched to eventing, the biggest hurdle for me (AND my horse) was going out on x-c alone. I know that there is not a lot of difference to some people, but there were lots of things that made me a bit of a head case when I first started eventing. I was totally capable, but I needed someone to warm me up to help me relax, have a couple nice jumps, reassure me and calm me down. I know that doing that on my own is a great goal, but at the time I really needed the extra support. I still made it around the x-c just fine all by myself! But, I credit that in part to having someone get my head in the game before the fact by reminding me to stop checking the horse to the fence, to look up, to breathe, etc.
    understandable.
    The warm up was my hurdle when I started eventing alone too.

    Friends are good for this too!!
    http://kaboomeventing.com/
    http://kaboomeventing.blogspot.com/
    Horses are amazing athletes and make no mistake -- they are the stars of the show!



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan. 19, 2005
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    11,908

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by purplnurpl View Post
    understandable.
    The warm up was my hurdle when I started eventing alone too.

    Friends are good for this too!!

    I also agree...that's why I said leaning how to warm up you and your horse is a skill. It is something you must learn how to do.....and takes some work (both before the show and at the show)
    ** The difference between genius and stupidity is genius has its limits. -- Albert Einstein **



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jan. 8, 2007
    Location
    Ithaca, NY
    Posts
    552

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by purplnurpl View Post
    understandable.
    The warm up was my hurdle when I started eventing alone too.

    Friends are good for this too!!
    I'm not sure warm up will ever stop being a hurdle for me, not so much that I can't figure out how to warm up... but just trying to dodge people/establish my space a little bit, and the like.

    I would like to throw in that you should never be afraid to talk to people around you. One of the many things I like about eventing is that your trailer neighbors are generally willing to answer a question about the course and are welcome if you want to do the same. I go to events alone a great deal, and letting someone know that (moms with children on ponies that don't look like they are going to loose it with their own nerves seem to really get this) always seems like a good idea.
    ~T3DE 2010 Pact Clique~



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Oct. 17, 2009
    Location
    Unionville
    Posts
    1,071

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bornfreenowexpensive View Post
    I also agree...that's why I said leaning how to warm up you and your horse is a skill. It is something you must learn how to do.....and takes some work (both before the show and at the show)
    Why is it something that you MUST learn how to do? If you don't mind paying for the trainer to warm you up why does it matter? You're still going x-c by yourself but at least you are starting out on a good note.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals" Immanuel Kant



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Feb. 5, 2007
    Posts
    295

    Default I thought that I was the only one with warm-up issues

    Sorry for the hijack -

    I'm so grateful to see that others have issues in warm-up. It makes my head want to explode.

    But in regards to the op, I love touching base with a trainer at an event. Having someone more experienced to walk XC with me is a big help. And there's nothing better than having someone who knows how hard you've been working, meet you at the finish.

    If you can find that with a friend who has more experience than you, I'd tag along to a few events with them.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Aug. 21, 2000
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    2,571

    Default

    "Learn" how to warm up?
    I thought you just look around for someone who DOES have help on the ground and follow them around over every fence! Sure, you get dirty looks when their helper has to pick up the rail you hit, but what choice do they have?
    It's a fabulous warm-up technique until you accidentally pick the person (ie, Sally Cousins ) who likes to jack up the fences to enormous heights for the last few jumps.
    I evented just for the Halibut.



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