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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2008
    Posts
    46

    Default Brenderup or Equispirit?

    Hi, I'll be purchasing a new horse trailer and need some help from anyone who has used the trailers I'm considering. I have an '08 Honda ridgeline and a 16.1 Hanoverian about 1500 lbs. The max weight for my Honda and hitch is 5000 and tongue at 500 lbs. So I need a trailer that I can haul with my ridgeline (which I love). I've looked at the brenderup baron one horse or two TC and also the equispirit one horse slant with tack. Anyone have any advice on what would work best with my truck? Safety of the brenderup? Or can my honda pull the equispirit uphill. Would really appreciate any info that would help with the purchase. Anyone have any photos of their favorite trailers?
    thanks
    Jill
    Jill M. Patt, DVM
    All Things Horse & Hound
    www.sensationsporthorses.com/shop



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug. 6, 2003
    Location
    Lapeer, MI, USA
    Posts
    4,075

    Default

    What's the max weight for your Ridgeline? How long is the wheelbase?

    How much does the Brenderup weigh, empty?
    How much does the E'spirit weigh, empty?

    Since horses are top heavy and not the optimal load, you should only haul 80% of your tow vehicle's max, for safety reasons.
    If you were hauling a boat or snowmobiles on a trailer and the weight were down low and strapped down, then you can haul maximum. But horses that move around and all that? 80% is a good safety margin.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec. 29, 2006
    Location
    Davie, FL
    Posts
    960

    Default

    I have driven a Ridgeline with a Brenderup with one (1100#) horse and it was fine. My friend, who owns that rig, has pulled it with two horses and said it was no problem (5 hour hauls). Mostly flat land, hills could be another story altogether.

    I doubt I would trust the Ridgeline with anything bigger...my worry would be stopping (well, *not* stopping actually) as much as pulling capability...its pretty small to be towing horses IMHO.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2008
    Posts
    46

    Default Ridgeline

    The max weight for the Ridgeline is 5000. The equispirit one horse is close to 3000.00 - http://www.equispirit.com/products/1-horse.htm and the brenderup is 1900 to 2700 depending on the model - http://www.brenderuprealtrailers.com/frames/index.htm. Not sure of the wheel base - will have to check on this. Jill
    Jill M. Patt, DVM
    All Things Horse & Hound
    www.sensationsporthorses.com/shop



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2008
    Posts
    46

    Default weights

    So checked again and the baron one Tc is 1700 lbs. and the baron 2 tc is 2150. Also the equispirit I needed in xl and this is 3100 lbs. Looks like the brenderup is best? Any thoughts from brenderup owners? Would you buy again?
    Jill
    Jill M. Patt, DVM
    All Things Horse & Hound
    www.sensationsporthorses.com/shop



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar. 17, 2008
    Posts
    472

    Default I own a brenderup Prestige

    I've had a brenderup for almost 5 yrs now, bought it used, and have nothing but good things to say about it. I haul with a Honda Odissey, have hauled 2 horses for a combined weight of close to 2,000lbs plus the 1,750-lb trailer. My longest trip was +600 miles each way. It is very stable, comfy for the horses, easy on the van (I did add the power train to the van as suggested by Honda dealer). I didn't know how much I liked it until I drove a friend's truck and regular trailer, and was very tired after less than 2 hours driving it.

    The only downside is that my van has low clearance and is not 4WD, so it is hard when driving on pastures or muddy or snowy paths (as in some parking areas for shows).

    I am also impressed with its durability: mine is 11 years old and still pretty solid. I'd buy another one when the time comes.
    ___________________________________________
    "Another member of the Barefoot Eventers Clique"



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb. 13, 2005
    Location
    Columbus, OH
    Posts
    6,795

    Default

    jill - welcome to the forum. I suggest you do a search as many Brenderup owners have weighed in on previous threads.

    My understanding is that the biggest engine they make in the Ridgeline is a 3.5L V6, and you're talking about pulling 4000+ lbs. + gear with that. You MIGHT be able to pull it--as you said, it's within your 5000 lb pulling capacity--but you will kill that V6 engine and shoot your transmission. I would be surprised if you could pull it over hills comfortably and/or easily. You will feel the trailer behind you the whole time and will not be a happy camper when you're replacing your whole vehicle suspension, engine, and tranny next year.

    If you are just now starting to research Brenderup, I urge you to get your hands on their info DVD--if you inquire using the web form at brenderuprealtrailers.com, they'll send it to you for free. I was raised and reared in the American world of towing, which is "get the biggest truck you can, make sure you have trailer brakes, don't pull with anything smaller than a half-ton truck and a V8 engine, etc." I certainly wouldn't pull the Equispirit with anything less than that. But a Brenderup really is different and truly is built for a lighter vehicle, and that's NOT just because it weighs less.

    For example, let's just consider one of the Brenderup features that's relevant to the weight equation: tongue weight. On a traditional bumper pull trailer like the Equispirit, up to 15% or even 20% of your trailer's weight will rest on your vehicle's hitch. So let's say very conservatively that it'll put 10% tongue weight on your vehicle. 4000 pounds x 10% = 400 pounds. That's like having two big dudes riding around on your tailgate all the time, and it's awfully close to your hitch limit. Imagine what that's going to do to your suspension system even with the Equispirit's weight distribution system, and even if you add your own sway bars and weight distribution hitch.

    The Brenderup, however, was designed for the European market, where laws require the trailer to have 4% or less of its weight on the vehicle's tongue. So let's say you're pulling the 2150 lb. Baron + a 1400 pound horse. Even at the max of 4% tongue weight, the Brenderup would put 142 pounds of weight on your vehicle's hitch and suspension. I've put heavier things onto my rear suspension just by taking a good shopping trip.

    Guaranteed there will be people who respond to this thread who haven't researched the Brenderup, and they will whine "But if the B'up only has 4% of the weight on the hitch then it's going to sway all over the road." That is B.S. and suggests that they haven't researched the B'ups other features. I won't get into them here since this is already getting long, but if the link below doesn't answer your questions, feel free to PM me.

    And that's not even getting into the comfort features for the horse. This web site will make your eyes bleed, but there's a link to a video on here of a Brenderup salesperson that will blow your mind. Look for the link that says "Cathy why do you like Brenderup trailers?" The salesperson gets into the back of a Brenderup Baron going 45 mph down a gravel road and puts a wine glass on the floor. Try that in the Equispirit and see if you get the same result.
    http://www.american-flex.com/brender...20trailers.htm

    I've only had my Brenderup for about two months but I am crazy about it already. It is 11 years old and I bought it used, and it's still in good running condition. I can hitch it up myself in about 3 minutes flat, my horse loves it, it runs like a dream on the interstate, hell it even drives great on ice and snow (not that I enjoy driving it on ice and snow, but this is Michigan and sometimes that's necessary).

    The used market on Brenderups speaks for itself--they make thousands of Brenderups in the factory every year and have been doing so since 1982, yet you'd be lucky to find fifteen used Brenderups in the entire country at any given time. People buy them and hang onto them.
    Last edited by jn4jenny; Jan. 10, 2009 at 11:52 AM.
    ________________________
    Resident COTH saddle nerd. (CYA: Not a pro, just a long-time enthusiast!)
    http://twitter.com/jenlmichaels



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct. 9, 2004
    Location
    San Antonio
    Posts
    280

    Default

    Equispirit is hands down a better trailer for a horse, but your vehicle couldn't pull it safely.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug. 12, 2002
    Location
    Zone 6
    Posts
    1,876

    Default

    If I could afford the Equispirit, I'd love to have one. But, like the last poster said, it's way too much for your vehicle. You're only hope is the Brenderup and I'm not so sure that's even a good idea. Besides the safety issue of towing, it's really going to wear hard on your honda.
    https://www.facebook.com/HunterHillFarmIowa

    Oh my god - she's gone and got the eventing bug! I will send you some antibiotics! Take the entire bottle and do two hunter shows and it will pass!



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr. 3, 2005
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    961

    Default

    Well I'm biased, but I would choose a Brenderup because that is what I want and plan on getting one day! But honestly, the vehicle you are using couldn't handle a Equispirit and you're probably a bit iffy with the Brenderup.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct. 25, 2006
    Location
    Central Illinois
    Posts
    822

    Default

    Brenderups are awesome. I have had my for two years. I haul w/a Dodge Durango. I usually haul several times a week for trail rides, usually w/two horses.

    Most people have NO experience w/them. Those people are typically the ones that claim they arent safe, etc.

    I completely disagree. They are VERY well built. I just wish they had a three horse option, but my B'rup fits my life style really well now.

    I can hook up w/in 2 minutes. It is VERY easy to haul, in fact, there are times where I forget I am hauling until I look in the rear view mirror. Most of the time, you can NOT feel it, even w/two big horses.

    If they were so dangerous, you would hear about it. They are used as the standard in Europe. Not too many people have large trucks, so they developed trailers that did not need a big tow vehicle.

    I love my B'rup. They are more expensive, BUT have great resale. It was a lot cheaper than buying a NEW vehicle AND trailer.

    My next vehicle I will get a bigger truck. I will keep my B'rup for awhile, but there are several times in where I need a three horse trailer. It may be awhile before I make the change. Again, I really am very happy w/my B'rup. It is my first trailer, and the first trailer I have EVER hauled.

    This lists the requirements of a tow vehicle for the B'rup. I think your vehicle would be just fine....

    http://www.brenderuprealtrailers.com/frames/index.htm

    Your vehicle is not heavy enough to STOP the trailer if you ever lost control, so I would steer you away from anything other than a B'rup IF you want to be safe.
    Good luck!



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar. 28, 2008
    Posts
    38

    Default

    Your car will do just fine with a Brenderup. I pull mine with a Lexus RX which has a 3,500 lb towing capacity and a much softer suspension than the Ridgeline. It hauls great and hasn't caused mechanical problems with my car.

    When I was trying to figure out whether a manufacturer's tow ratings were safe to tow a horse trailer, I spent some time talking to an engineer at Toyota's US engineering/test facility. What he made clear is that the towing capacity ratings have one purpose, and that's to prevent premature wear which would trigger premature warranty repairs. So if your car manufacturer says it can haul 5,000 lbs, it will haul 5,000 lbs without causing premature mechanical failure.

    Here's where Jn4jenny left off on the tongue weight:
    The reason American trailer manufacturer's put a high percentage of the trailer's weight on the tongue is to use the tow vehicle to stabilize the trailer. The trailer needs this added stability because the suspensions aren't engineered to travel straight and the trailers are subject to being pulled into the vaccum created behind passing vehicles (the vaccum increases in direct proportion to size and speed of the passing vehicle). In short, because the trailers are sloppy on the road, they require the tow vehicle to stabilize them. Add to that the influence of a moving horse inside the trailer. Since the trailer is not engineered to hold it's direction on the road, the movement of the horse will be transferred to the tow vehicle. So people who pull a traditional horse trailer are absolutely right when they say that you need a big heavy vehicle. Anything less with a traditional horse trailer probably IS insufficient to meet the demands the trailer will put on the car.

    To create a trailer that could be pulled by lighter weight vehicles, Brenderup had to completely re-design the chassis and aerodynamics of their trailer. The trailer is stabilized by it's own chassis and suspension, not the tow vehicle. Even when horses are moving around, the chassis counteracts the movement of weight. Also, the shape of the trailer is designed so it isn't impacted by the vacuum created by passing vehicles. That allowed them to relieve the demand on the tow vehicle by transferring the load weight towards the rear of the trailer, over the axles. (The added benefit of this design is it also creates more headroom for the horse.)

    Sorry this is so long...but there's no quick way of explaining it.

    Oh, one more thing. You don't need a Baron or for the size of your horse. A Royal would work equally well. Here's a quick comparison to the EquiSpirit. After you deduct the weight of the trailer and your horse from your towing capaciy, the remaining weight you'd have available for gear and a second horse is:
    Baron: 1,350 lbs
    Royal: 1,800 lbs
    EquiSpirit: 500 lbs



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar. 28, 2008
    Posts
    38

    Default

    Your car will do just fine with a Brenderup. I pull mine with a Lexus RX which has a 3,500 lb towing capacity and a much softer suspension than the Ridgeline. It hauls great and hasn't caused mechanical problems with my car.

    When I was trying to figure out whether a manufacturer's tow ratings were safe to tow a horse trailer, I spent some time talking to an engineer at Toyota's US engineering/test facility. What he made clear is that the towing capacity ratings have one purpose, and that's to prevent premature wear which would trigger premature warranty repairs. So if your car manufacturer says it can haul 5,000 lbs, it will haul 5,000 lbs without causing premature mechanical failure.

    Here's where Jn4jenny left off on the tongue weight. It's important, so I'll continue:
    The reason American trailer manufacturers put a high percentage of the trailer's weight on the tongue is to use the tow vehicle to stabilize the trailer. The trailer needs this added stability because the trailer's chassis isn't engineered to travel straight and the trailers aerodynamics cause it to being pulled into the vaccum created behind passing vehicles (the vaccum increases in direct proportion to size and speed of the passing vehicle). In short, because the trailers are sloppy on the road, they require the tow vehicle to stabilize them. So what the manufacturer's do is design the trailers to load between 15-20% of the trailer's weight on to the tongue. When the trailer sways, the added tongue weight causes the tow vehicle to stabilize it.

    Added to the inherent instability caused by the trailer's design, is the influence of a moving horse inside the trailer. Since the trailer is not engineered to hold it's direction on the road, the movement of the horse will cause sway in the trailer which has to be stabilized by the tow vehicle. So people who pull a traditional horse trailer are absolutely right when they say that they need a big heavy vehicle. Anything less with a traditional horse trailer probably IS insufficient to meet the demands the trailer will put on the car (oops...heavy duty truck).

    To create a trailer that could be pulled by lighter weight vehicles, Brenderup had to completely re-design the chassis and aerodynamics of their trailer. The trailer is stabilized by it's own chassis and suspension, not the tow vehicle. Even when horses are moving around, the chassis counteracts the movement of weight. Also, the shape of the trailer is designed so it isn't impacted by the vacuum created by passing vehicles. The re-designed chassis and trailer body allowed them to transfer the load weight towards the rear of the trailer, over the axles. This relieved the demand the trailer puts on the tow vehicle. (The added benefit of this design is it also creates more headroom for the horse.)

    Sorry this is so long...but there's no quick way of explaining it.

    Oh, one more thing. You don't need a Baron or for the size of your horse. A Royal would work equally well. Here's a quick comparison to the EquiSpirit. After you deduct the weight of the trailer and your horse from your towing capaciy, the remaining weight you'd have available for gear and a second horse is:
    Baron: 1,350 lbs
    Royal: 1,800 lbs
    EquiSpirit: 500 lbs

    Hope this helps.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr. 27, 2008
    Posts
    2,291

    Default

    I have nothing to add to this thread because I have yet to hook my trailer up and drive it off the property. But I recently got a Brenderup Baron One, and I AM THRILLED!



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun. 20, 2008
    Posts
    3,509

    Default

    If I were to get a trailer I'd get the equispirit - I would also opt for a 2 horse because I think overall it's a better investment/resale. But since you are going to be towing w/ current vehicle then you might want to go w/ Brenderup. A friend tows a 2 horse trailer/no tack room w/ a Nissan Xtera but it has a hemi engine - she only does light hauling w/ it - any place of any distance she borrows a truck.

    From what I've heard - those who have Brenderups really like them



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun. 1, 2002
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    10,995

    Default

    Resale is terrible on brenderups, mostly for the buyers because the owners refuse to sell them!!! I almost never see brenderups for sale used and when I do they go FAST and for close to full price.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2008
    Posts
    46

    Default brenderup

    Thanks brendergal - great information. And congrats to Nin - you'll have to repost on your driving experience
    Jill
    Jill M. Patt, DVM
    All Things Horse & Hound
    www.sensationsporthorses.com/shop



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jul. 27, 2005
    Location
    Mississippi
    Posts
    3,001

    Default

    Do read as many trailer threads as you can, I think it may be very informative.

    Your Honda reminds me of the Dakota as far as basic size and engine and I killed the transmission on my Dakota towing one time! So go with the lightest load possible. The Honda's torque is less than a well equipped v8 Jeep Grand Cherokee. It is not a first choice towing vehicle for a horse trailer! Can you get away with it with very light trailer? Towing horses is different from towing say a boat or utility trailer, keep that in mind and do some reading.

    Mr truck has a lot of info and reviews http://mrtruck.net/index.html

    The Brender up is a light trailer but some models are not light enough for just any vehicle so choose the lightest one you can get away with. The one thing I didn't like about them is the braking system. The Equispirit or Hawk would be my trailer of choice but it would not be safe to haul it with your truck. You might want to investigate the price difference of buying a used truck and trailer for hauling verses making your every day vehicle work as a tow vehicle. With a large truck you can haul many different trailers and so you have a larger selection.

    I am in the same boat and so have decided to hold off and get a used large truck and trailer some day and maybe switch to a fuel efficient car for every day use.

    BTW, I do have the Brender-up DVD and have read all their literature. Their cost and the difficulty finding them used was a deterrent for me. The other thing about them was room or lack of it. You are limited by the number of horses you can haul and tack room size is limited.
    Last edited by MSP; Jan. 14, 2009 at 11:04 AM. Reason: after thought about the Brender-ups
    /Don't Judge...
    1 in 100 children, 1 in 94 boys and 1 in 88 military children...
    It’s time to listen.
    Every day!/



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Apr. 7, 2004
    Location
    NoVa
    Posts
    5,079

    Default

    I had a B-rup for about 3 years and loved it!

    When I sold it, I got what I paid for it, plus the $1300 I spent putting in a new floor, and I had multiple people who wanted it. So other than the ~$200/year I spent on an annual full body inspection, I had a free trailer.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2005
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    193

    Default

    I have a brenderup Baron 2 horse with the insta-tack and I absolutely LOVE it.
    I bought it new from a dealership in Texas and the shipped it to my in NJ.

    It is roomy in there for the horses and is nice and bright and airy. The 8 way windows are great on the side. You should go to their website and have them send you the DVD, its very interesting.

    I am seeing more and more of them on the road and at events recently.

    They haul great. To be hoenst my friends big heavy trailer is all over the road, yet my b'up is right behind me and never sways.

    It has its own breaking system (similar to a boat trailer) and I have never had a problem breaking.

    The tack area on mine (biggest model) is smaller than the typical trailers, but you just have to be innovative. I went to walmart and bought 2 7 drawer plastic bins and everything is organized. The small space makes you stay organized in that trailer. . . .

    ITS GREAT!



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