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Dog fostering gone wrong...not because of the dog, but the organization.

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  • Dog fostering gone wrong...not because of the dog, but the organization.

    Some of you probably helped me figure out what kind of mix my sweet foster dog is Now 3 weeks after picking him up from the shelter, things have gone really down hill and I need to vent. I'm also open to advice or ideas about how to work with this situation if anyone wants.

    Here's the rundown. This dog spent 30 days at animal control before I picked him up as a foster with the shelter's new fostering program. I've been told that during his time at the shelter everyone thought he had really bad breath, but no one thought to check his mouth until week 3. Well he had a deer bone lodged in the roof of his mouth...vet removed it suspecting that it had been there for probably 6 months or so. He had a course of antibiotics and all of the animal control workers thought that would be the end of it. I met this dog during his 4th week at the shelter while I was volunteering there. I decided to foster him because he looked to be a little older and absolutely miserable and arthritic laying on concrete 24/7.

    After picking him up from the shelter I took him to my local vet school's small animal clinic (I take my own dogs there and really appreciate the thorough exams and enthusiasm for animals). I chose to pay out of pocket for this extra care for him so that he could get the serious deworming he needed, be put on heartworm and flea preventative, have an ear infection taken care of, and most importantly have his mouth evaluated. In my mind he would be more appealing to adopters if some of the more unpleasant things had been taken care of ahead of time and that was just my gift to him and his future adopter. After examining him, a 4th vet student and full DVM came in to discuss what they found...basically he still has serious infection, fistulas, resorption, and advanced periodontal disease. They recommended having a dental procedure done that includes bloodwork, radiographs, anesthesia, cleaning, likely what will be many extractions, pain meds, and antibiotics for $565. This is all based on pain levels and usefulness of his teeth which are pretty much just nubs anyway (and to prevent infection from spreading to his kidneys and heart). They gave me the cheapest quote possible because he is in foster and I feel really confident with their findings.

    So I take this information back to animal control's foster organization and I'm shot down and told I can't raise money to have this done. I thought it would be helpful to be the type of foster parent that would fundraise for their foster dog but I guess not? I get a call later on saying that they don't think anyone will ever want him and that the choice is for me to either hospice foster him or take him back to the shelter to be euthanized. That was a quick way to make me mad. I will NOT whatsoever take this dog back to that shelter. I think he'll make a great pet for someone once he's clear of all this infection.

    I'm not the type of person who wants to keep a dog alive through extensive pain. I've made the decision to put 2 of my dogs to sleep when it became that time. But this dog isn't at that point. There's an option to alleviate his pain and I really feel like he has plenty of good years left once we get rid of the infection.

    That was really long, so if anyone actually reads through it thanks

  • #2
    I'd just pay it and move forward. Poor pup, I'm glad he landed with you!
    “Most people do not listen with the intent to understand; they listen with the intent to reply.” Stephen R. Covey

    Comment


    • #3
      Poor boy. I'm sure the animal control is super packed and what not but sounds like a relatively easy fix.

      Glad he found you

      P.
      A Wandering Albertan - NEW Africa travel blog!

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      • Original Poster

        #4
        So just go ahead and fundraise, regardless that they said not to?

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        • #5
          I ADOPTED a 2 yr old that ended up needing $500+ in dental work after the rescue told me everything was taken care of. After I reported back, they said their vet didn't think he needed anything and they only did dentals by referral. Adoption fee was $300. He's been here 6 months now and is happily lying on the blanket next to me sleeping He felt so much better after having 5 teeth removed.

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          • Original Poster

            #6
            Originally posted by RobinL View Post
            He felt so much better after having 5 teeth removed.
            Yep. I tried to explain that he'll be so much better off after he has the infected ones removed. I was met with the response that "I'll degrade his quality of life" and I completely disagree.

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            • #7
              Anyone can set up a GoFundMe, free country and all that.
              "We, too, will be remembered not for victories or defeats in battle or in politics, but for our contribution to the human spirit." JFK

              Comment

              • Original Poster

                #8
                Haha thank goodness for a free country. I guess I should have phrased it that I'm concerned they'll be mad when they realize I've gone and had multiple teeth surgically removed. He does belong to the county at this point...

                Comment


                • #9
                  I get that they're not being entirely responsible in paying for this dog's care, but from the rescue's POV there is a legitimate reason for them to deny you fundraising on their behalf. I work in nonprofits, and because we have to fundraise constantly to stay open, we're really careful about who we ask, and who we allow to ask for us. It's a delicate balance and I'm sure they've been burned before.

                  That said - yeah, they should be stepping up to pay for the dog. But they're not. And it's technically their dog. So I think you should ask them permission to do invasive medical procedures, and I think if you're dedicated to doing it you should pay for it. It kind of stinks, and I'm sorry.
                  life + horses
                  beljoeor.blogspot.com

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                  • #10
                    I figured that is what you were concerned about. Adopt the doggie and raise the funds. Absolutely do not do any medical procedures unless you own the dog, or at least get their okay to do so on your own. I doubt they will care since they are going to euthanize the dog if he is returned, but better to have yourself covered just in case.
                    "We, too, will be remembered not for victories or defeats in battle or in politics, but for our contribution to the human spirit." JFK

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                    • Original Poster

                      #11
                      Originally posted by kerlin View Post
                      I get that they're not being entirely responsible in paying for this dog's care, but from the rescue's POV there is a legitimate reason for them to deny you fundraising on their behalf. I work in nonprofits, and because we have to fundraise constantly to stay open, we're really careful about who we ask, and who we allow to ask for us.
                      Do you think my request to fundraise would be more well received if I don't include the organization name and just state that he's a foster dog? I want to put donation jars and flyers at local businesses.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Just freaking ADOPT him yourself. Once he is 'your' dog you can proceed to pamper him as he deserves.
                        Jeanie
                        RIP Sasha, best dog ever, pictured shortly before she died, Death either by euthanasia or natural causes is only the end of the animal inhabiting its body; I believe the spirit lives on.

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                        • #13
                          I think 'they' don't want to fundraise, since limited pool to draw from.
                          That said, I also think they have to tell you not to fundraise.

                          They might get po'd if you do the surgery. I'd adopt dog, do what is right, and put him up for adoption. Or keep him
                          save lives...spay/neuter/geld

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by kerlin View Post
                            I get that they're not being entirely responsible in paying for this dog's care, but from the rescue's POV there is a legitimate reason for them to deny you fundraising on their behalf. I work in nonprofits, and because we have to fundraise constantly to stay open, we're really careful about who we ask, and who we allow to ask for us. It's a delicate balance and I'm sure they've been burned before.

                            That said - yeah, they should be stepping up to pay for the dog. But they're not. And it's technically their dog. So I think you should ask them permission to do invasive medical procedures, and I think if you're dedicated to doing it you should pay for it. It kind of stinks, and I'm sorry.
                            I agree, and I work for our local animal control shelter. We have a $$ amount budgeted for veterinary expenses. There are just some things we can't do for the animals in the shelter due to the cost. Yes, animals are euthanized with medical conditions that could be treated. It sucks big time. We will often put dogs up for adoption that need dentals(or other medical procedures), making sure the potential adopter knows this. We are not a private rescue, we do not pick and choose what comes though the door. If you were a volunteer for where I work and set up a fundraiser after being told no, you would probably no longer be a volunteer and would either have to return the dog or adopt. Now if you wanted to make a donation that covered the cost of the care the dog needs, that's different and something I've done myself with fosters. I know it could happen with each animal I foster.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by kerlin View Post
                              I get that they're not being entirely responsible in paying for this dog's care, but from the rescue's POV there is a legitimate reason for them to deny you fundraising on their behalf. I work in nonprofits, and because we have to fundraise constantly to stay open, we're really careful about who we ask, and who we allow to ask for us. It's a delicate balance and I'm sure they've been burned before.

                              That said - yeah, they should be stepping up to pay for the dog. But they're not. And it's technically their dog. So I think you should ask them permission to do invasive medical procedures, and I think if you're dedicated to doing it you should pay for it. It kind of stinks, and I'm sorry.
                              I'd argue that there's no way in heck the foster should pay for this. I'm really rather appalled at the approach taken by the animal shelter. It is NOT fair to potential adopters to be handed something needing major dental care. This kind of thing needs to be taken care of prior to adoption. NH requires that all animals imported for adoption have a health certificate prior to being released. I do these exams and have periodically refused to sign off on them for hideous dental disease. The rescues pay for dental care before the pet is adopted out. It actually infuriates me how many clearly ill animals have been issued health certificates for transport by veterinarians in other states. That he was sent to foster care with parasites and without heartworm prevention is also disturbing. This kind of thing would get a shelter in Maine in danger of losing their license.

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                              • #16
                                Go ahead and fundraise. If you do an online link, send it to me and I'll post it on facebook. What a horrible excuse for a shelter.

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                                • #17
                                  Good luck and keep us posted! Maybe you can find a new home for him on your own, word of mouth etc, friend of a friend network, ahead of time.
                                  Jeanie
                                  RIP Sasha, best dog ever, pictured shortly before she died, Death either by euthanasia or natural causes is only the end of the animal inhabiting its body; I believe the spirit lives on.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by Marshfield View Post
                                    I'd argue that there's no way in heck the foster should pay for this. I'm really rather appalled at the approach taken by the animal shelter. It is NOT fair to potential adopters to be handed something needing major dental care. This kind of thing needs to be taken care of prior to adoption.

                                    Prior to adoption? With what $$. Say fundraising is approved, but the money isn't raised? Then what? Would you prefer the dog be euthanized instead of given a chance at finding a home that is willing to bear the expense? I'm honestly interested in hearing others answers to these issues as these are ones I face on a daily basis.


                                    I've been asked to foster some animals, and then there are the ones I asked to foster. The ones I chose, I know I could end up bearing the expense of medical treatments. I see an animal with potential, a budget that wouldn't allow it and stepped in to try and make a difference.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Originally posted by Montana1 View Post
                                      Do you think my request to fundraise would be more well received if I don't include the organization name and just state that he's a foster dog? I want to put donation jars and flyers at local businesses.
                                      From their point of view? Maybe. I ran the foster program for a very large, regional humane society that was open admission (they would euthanize for time and space issues if they had to).

                                      The truth is that they look bad when a volunteer is out in the community, fund raising for one of their animals. The question will invariably come up down the road as to why Foster Parent Z can't do the same thing for Foster Dog F. Or some irate resident will demand to know why their taxes are going to an agency that sure appears to be able to also get money through donations.

                                      It is a very slippery slope for the shelter, with ramifications well beyond this particular dog. If I am reading the OP correctly, the shelter is animal control? I am willing to bet that they are underfunded. This isn't a snazzy, private rescue (some of which will pour thousands into an animal who has a crappy quality of life even after all the expensive vet care). The hard truth is that most animal controls can't afford anything beyond the most basic vet care.

                                      I think the best bet is to adopt him yourself. Fund raise for his dental care without ever mentioning animal control (although calling him a your own private foster will help most people understand that you're not trying to get your own pet treated). And then place him after he has reached his optimal health.

                                      It sucks for everyone. Good luck.
                                      Sheilah

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                                      • Original Poster

                                        #20
                                        IdahoRider, it is animal control I'm working with. They've allowed fundraising for other fosters just not for him so I don't really know that it's a slippery slope thing. They won't allow him to be adopted by anyone, just long term fostered. I mentioned that I was only given 2 choices but I didn't make clear the reason why. That's my fault. He's no longer up for adoption because they don't think he'll make it through a neuter and they can't let him be adopted without neutering at some point. My vets have said anesthesia isn't that risky for him but there's no convincing animal control of that.

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