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**Update pg. 4 with pics!** What breed of dog is right for my family?

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  • bits619
    replied
    Ahh she's gorgeous and looks quite at home. Congrats on the new family member!

    Leave a comment:


  • foundationmare
    replied
    Good on you op for getting an older dog from a rescue situation! Congrats on your new family member. Funny thing is that, reading through this, I see references to several breeds that I have lived with over my lifetime. We had serial collies and lore has it that one girl named tangerine stopped toddler me from marching down our very long driveway by repeatedly blocking my way and herding me back to the house. Collies are wonderful dogs! We also had landseer newfies. Again, great dogs, albeit toting a lot of slobber! Bassetts were goofy and fun. My miniature poodle was so smart it was spooky. Poodles are very trainable, energetic but not frenetically so, and loyal. Someday I will have a standard but it will be through a rescue/shelter.

    Leave a comment:


  • Coyoteco
    replied
    beautiful!

    Leave a comment:


  • Frivian
    replied
    Oops! Forgot to update the thread! Thanks everyone so much for all the suggestions.

    We thought we were going to get a Newf... I even contacted some breeders. But then we decided it would be best for us to have an adult dog. So I contacted a few local rescues (including the Newf rescue) just to see what they had available and how they all operated. We applied to a rescue that operates by pulling dogs out of high-kill shelters and placing them in foster care until they can be adopted. We were approved after an interview and reference/landlord/vet checks.

    They showed us this sweet girl:
    http://i1112.photobucket.com/albums/...211_154702.jpg
    http://i1112.photobucket.com/albums/...211_154430.jpg
    http://i1112.photobucket.com/albums/...210_113054.jpg (the cat was growling at her in this picture, and she didn't know what to do!)

    We brought her home on Saturday. We are calling her Bailey (she didn't really know the name she came with, so we just changed it outright). She came from a rural shelter in SC, and was transported up here in January. She was her foster mom's very first dog, and the foster mom loved her! She is so sweet, very friendly, and wants to lick everyone to death (including the baby!). She is confused by the kitty because the kitty will growl and hiss at Bailey whenever she is nearby... which causes Bailey to look at me in confusion as if to say, "why is this little dog so mean? I just want to be her friend!" And then she will back away.

    She is approximately 2 years old, and mostly house trained (she wasn't when she went to the foster, but she is doing pretty well with it now). She tries very hard to listen to us, although she doesn't really know anything yet. We are going to do some obedience school with her soon, but working on the basic 'sit, stay, etc.' with her in the meantime. I think we are going to try clicker training (and I have the contact info of a trainer who practices this method).

    Anyway, so far so good! We keep the baby and her separated for the most part, for many reasons, but mainly just to make sure nothing happens. But we do let the baby "pet" her (i.e. we guide the baby's hand along Bailey's back to show her how to pet the dog).

    Thanks again for all the advice! We love our newest family member!

    Leave a comment:


  • LauraKY
    replied
    Originally posted by kasjordan View Post
    Wondering if you picked out a pup yet? I saw this picture my niece just posted of her collie and her 2 week old baby girl.....THIS is what a collie is all about. Never had one that was any different.....
    http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b2...ps03342867.jpg
    Beautiful dog! My last collie used to play tag with the neighbor's or visitors kids...and she understood the rules.

    I still wouldn't bring home a new dog with a baby or toddler at home though.

    Leave a comment:


  • Go Fish
    replied
    While not large dogs, both the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel or the English Cocker Spaniel are fabulous family/kid dogs. Kind-hearted, don't require a ton of exercise, stay close to home and easy to train.

    Another breed that is great around kids is the Bouvier de Flandres. However, they tend to be more on the protective side, and while not what I would call aggressive, they seem to be a bit wary of strangers approaching the home or family. They also require regular grooming as their hair sort of grows like a poodle's does.

    Generally speaking, I would stay away from herding dogs. They're bred to chase things. I'd be concerned about hounds, too, as they tend to want to wander, although I think Beagles are the best kid dogs ever. I think I would avoid a terrier as well, as they tend to chase (and sometimes kill) cats.

    Leave a comment:


  • allintexas
    replied
    Originally posted by vacation1 View Post
    I'd look for a good shelter or rescue and ask them to look out for a gentle dog, preferably an owner surrender and definitely not a guard or fighting breed, who adores children. The sporting breeds, Beagle and Sheltie mixes are all likely candidates. I say "adores" because tolerant isn't good enough for a household with infants and toddlers. A tolerant dog may one day bite a kid if the stars align wrong - the dog has a sore paw, it's been a long day, the 5yo is having a birthday party and all the kids are screaming and running around, the cat scratched his nose earlier, etc., and then a kid steps on that sore paw. A gentle dog who adores children only bites if she's being vivisected. I had one, and she was priceless. And from a shelter.
    This. I would work with a rescue, and find a dog that likes kids and doesn't mind cats. Many rescues will not adopt out big dog to homes with small kids, though.

    Leave a comment:


  • kasjordan
    replied
    Wondering if you picked out a pup yet? I saw this picture my niece just posted of her collie and her 2 week old baby girl.....THIS is what a collie is all about. Never had one that was any different.....
    http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b2...ps03342867.jpg

    Leave a comment:


  • alto
    replied
    Like any other dog, goldendoodles (& other crosses/mutts ) reflect their breeding - the local doodles fall very clearly into 2 distinct categories, the crazies from the local miller (their poodles & goldens are just as wild), & the wow dogs from the reputable breeder ...

    Most of what people are calling "breed attributes" are just "dog attributes" - almost any dog can be protective (food) aggressive hyper vigilant calm confident playful tolerant wild etc

    Choose a pup/dog whose energy level & temperament suits your family, this is the Volhard program - it has flaws of course, but will give you something to think about; note that temperament testing is best conducted by knowledgeable people.

    If you have any dog shows/working dog trials etc in your area, go out & visit.
    Look for shelters that have a dog behaviorist on staff.

    Leave a comment:


  • candysgirl
    replied
    Originally posted by bits619 View Post
    With the labradoodles, my parents have a goldendoodle who is also 75 percent poodle. They love her to pieces but honestly she's a neurotic mess. At 7 years old she's still petrified of flapping flags and palm trees on windy days, she'll be okay at the dog park and then decide to get the heck out of dodge one minute later. She was better the first two years of life until our last standard poodle died and she was on her own.
    So mrb and I searched for another companion for her, and found an AWESOME match. They wanted no (or little) shed, female, confident, similar size. At a local animal control there was a few month old boxer - poodle mix that had been dumped (a third party called and said the dog was one that the lady was trying to sell outside Walmart. Of course the lady who dumped her had a different story, wasn't her puppy etc etc).
    They got the PERFECT dog for them. Scout is a confident, playful, sweet and funny dog that isn't fazed by a thing. She could face the apocalypse and shrug, "okay, so no walk today?"
    I know just as easily we could have ended up with a wild, stubborn, unhealthy mess, but thankfully mrb and iI were able to foster the dog until we decided she'd work for my parents.

    I'm not sure what exactly my conclusion is from my anecdote except that I've seen more unhinged "doodles" than I have mentally stable ones. Not mean, just twitchy and hyperactive. But then we also found an awesome doodle in the boxer mix, so it's hard to say but generally yes, the Goldens/labs (or whatever, including boxers) that people are farming out to create the doodles, and the poodle breeders that are doing so also, will not typically have the creme de la creme of the breed, or the overall sake of their breed at heart. Not to say there isn't someone out there trying to create something overall healthy and sound minded, but more likely it's someone out to make a buck on the doodle craze.
    I've met very few doodles that aren't hyperactive idiots. They are usually dumb as rocks and never really seem to learn anything. I have 5-10 year old doodles that my salon has been grooming since they were puppies. Plenty long enough to learn to cooperate for grooming...and they just...never...grow...brains...

    There are a couple here and there that are decent dogs, but for the most part, they are just huge and hyperactive. People love them, but don't expect much beyond the ability to housebreak it and it to like your kids. Basic obedience and the ability to walk on a leash seems to escape most of them. Even the ones with owners who normally have very well behaved dogs. Now, from what I've seen, they tend to be really good with little kids just from the standpoint of being overly tolerant of anything the kids do to them. But they don't usually realize how big they are and do have a tendency to bowl the kids over.

    If you like the 'look' of doodles, get a standard poodle in your choice of color and have its hair cut like that. Contrary to popular belief, poodles do grow hair on their faces and feet and you do not *have* to shave it all off in the traditional poodle cuts if you don't want to. This actually seems to surprise a fair number of people that *not* shaving their faces and feet is an option. I groom a lot of poodles to "not look like poodles".

    Anyway, poodles are great. Labs and goldens can be great. Most of the crosses are not.

    The poodle rescues are pretty well organized in most states. The dogs usually go pretty fast, but contact some of them if you're looking for an adult. Otherwise go to some shows and see if you can't get an older puppy or young adult who just isn't working out to show or is finished, but they don't want to keep it for their program.

    Leave a comment:


  • Flurry84
    replied
    Good companion breeds which are raised by reputable, wise breeders are often very easy to housebreak. As the tiny puppies grow in the whelping box most will pick an area of the enclosure in which to relieve themselves and the breeder will immediately remove the papers which have been soiled. So, the puppies only know immaculate surroundings from the beginning and learn to prefer it that way. This is the reason many, many pups seem to housebreak themselves when the go to their new homes; they just don't know any other way!

    Carefully-bred Newfies and collies have wonderful, reliable temperaments. I would want a puppy to raise up in the household, too. Good luck in your quest.

    Leave a comment:


  • HomelessPony
    replied
    Plenty of puppies come into shelters too - you just have to be there at the right time, or like others have mentioned, let the shelter know what you're looking for so if something comes along they can call you right away. Be prepared to wait a little while for the right dog, I think temperament is more important than breeding. You can also look for smaller rescue groups that do not have a shelter but have their dogs in fosters homes. This will give you a better sense of disposition with an adult dog, as the foster home can tell you how the dog is interacting with kids, cats, and other dogs, as well as how it's reacting to new situations, housebreaking, etc. We adopted a 6 year old chihuahua jack russell mix (who is huge for that cross at 18 pounds) and he is the most wonderful, loving dog. Was dumped by his family but is housebroken, good with kids, dogs, and cats. His only vice is separation anxiety, which I'm told is common in shelter dogs but not incurable.

    Leave a comment:


  • gypsymare
    replied
    Originally posted by Frivian View Post
    Sorry, but like I said we're going to have more kids. If we wait until this kid is older, there will just be another baby. If we waited to get a dog until all kids were "older", we'd be waiting 6, 7 years, really who knows. We like big families.

    Lots of people have dogs and kids. Lots.
    And lots have tragic consequences. Lots. I have several large scars on my face. My temple, high on one cheek and two diagonal across the other one. I can feel the scars on the inside with my tongue.

    He was a family dog. Lab mix, great with kids. I was sitting in a tiny rocking chair and they think I rocked over his tail. I was 22 months old. My brother was right next to me. My grandmother had just stepped away for a moment.

    Several days in the hospital and 250 stitches (not that is not a typo--250). My grandmother almost killed herself over the guilt. My family did not know if I'd be horribly disfigured. I'm lucky that I don't remember any of it and don't have any lasting fear of dogs. My brother does. He was traumatized and still hates and fears dogs.

    With fantastic plastic surgery and access to an incredibly gifted surgeon, the scars are barely noticeable. The one at my temple looks like a dimple, the worst ones blend into the creases of my smile and the one on my other cheek is just a fine line.

    You cannot watch them every moment of every hour and even if you could you could never react fast enough. A child's skin is like butter.

    Please make an informed decision.

    Leave a comment:


  • Corbyville283
    replied
    Irish Red and White Setter

    I'm going to suggest an Irish Red and White Setter. Large but not huge, not as (hyper)active as the traditional red setter, less coat than a red setter. We got ours from a breeder when he was 6 months old and I couldn't ask for a better dog. He's good with the horses, the cats, visiting dogs and children. He's happy to curl up on the couch with me or go on a 2 hour walk with the neighbours. Not aggressive at all - the cats steal food from him. He has a great bark so is good when I'm home alone at night but is friendly during the day with anyone who comes in. He likes going for car rides, would play with toys forever and is just a great dog.

    Leave a comment:


  • bits619
    replied
    With the labradoodles, my parents have a goldendoodle who is also 75 percent poodle. They love her to pieces but honestly she's a neurotic mess. At 7 years old she's still petrified of flapping flags and palm trees on windy days, she'll be okay at the dog park and then decide to get the heck out of dodge one minute later. She was better the first two years of life until our last standard poodle died and she was on her own.
    So mrb and I searched for another companion for her, and found an AWESOME match. They wanted no (or little) shed, female, confident, similar size. At a local animal control there was a few month old boxer - poodle mix that had been dumped (a third party called and said the dog was one that the lady was trying to sell outside Walmart. Of course the lady who dumped her had a different story, wasn't her puppy etc etc).
    They got the PERFECT dog for them. Scout is a confident, playful, sweet and funny dog that isn't fazed by a thing. She could face the apocalypse and shrug, "okay, so no walk today?"
    I know just as easily we could have ended up with a wild, stubborn, unhealthy mess, but thankfully mrb and iI were able to foster the dog until we decided she'd work for my parents.

    I'm not sure what exactly my conclusion is from my anecdote except that I've seen more unhinged "doodles" than I have mentally stable ones. Not mean, just twitchy and hyperactive. But then we also found an awesome doodle in the boxer mix, so it's hard to say but generally yes, the Goldens/labs (or whatever, including boxers) that people are farming out to create the doodles, and the poodle breeders that are doing so also, will not typically have the creme de la creme of the breed, or the overall sake of their breed at heart. Not to say there isn't someone out there trying to create something overall healthy and sound minded, but more likely it's someone out to make a buck on the doodle craze.

    Leave a comment:


  • TrotTrotPumpkn
    replied
    I love, love, love a good standard poodle. If I wasn't training for ringsport, that's what I would have. As someone said, they can be protective though.

    I can't imagine having my (working line) Doberman puppy (well 8 mos. old) with a baby...[[[shudders]]] He is WAAAAAY too time demanding. It would be horrible. Dobe's need a lot of exercise and consistent training is always a good thing. Most have a lot of prey drive as well. My deceased female grew up with our cats and was ok, but she really wanted to kill them. It vexed her to her dying day that they were off limits.

    I had an American Water Spaniel as a kid. Great, great dog. They are often food aggressive, so something to watch. I also had an English Springer and she was field bred and very high energy.

    I have rescued an adult dog as have my SIL, MIL, and aunt and if you can find a dog that was in foster care where they will give you an honest assessment, you can probably find a great match there. My aunt and MIL have labs, but they are the older, totally laid back kind. My aunt's is also a very small lab--very nice size of dog to have.

    Leave a comment:


  • neversaynever
    replied
    Another vote for Newf! Hands down the best dog with kids. Hair can be a problem - when crawling and teething my kids tended to have beards, but their temperament more than made up for it. Our newfs did not drool excessively (they had "tighter" mouths) - only when excited, hot, when you had a treat for them, or after drinking water. We had a female who lived about 10 yrs, and a male that we lost not long ago at the age of 13. We had the first Newf as puppy a year before my oldest was born and got the second puppy when my youngest was about 3 or 4. The kids would pull up on and learned how to walk holding on to the dog.

    Oh, and the cat ruled the house.

    Leave a comment:


  • Frivian
    replied
    Thanks everyone for all the suggestions!

    My mom always had collies growing up, and has told me multiple times that they were always great dogs. I didn't even really think about them as an option! They are beautiful, too.

    Seems like a lot of people are saying standard poodle, too. I have not personally known any standard poodles, but a friend of mine has a labradoodle that is 75% poodle, and I do know that he is a great dog who wouldn't hurt a fly. However, he is very high-energy and excitable -but that may be the lab in him.

    Thanks for all the tips and advice about dog owning/parenting. I realize that no dog is 100% bombproof. I don't plan on allowing my daughter to take advantage of the dog's gentle nature, and I will teach her the appropriate way to interact with the dog. But like I said, no one is perfect and I'm sure there will come a time when she makes a mistake. I want the dog to have great bite inhibition, etc. but I also realize accidents happen. Obviously I will not blame the dog for reacting appropriately to something that is the child's fault. I do have a pretty good understanding of dog body language, and have spent a lot of time around all different kinds of dogs.

    My little brother was bitten by our golden retriever when he was only about 3 or 4. When the dog was young, she had very bad food possession issues. We all knew this and were taught to stay far away from her while she was eating. She even had her own room to eat in (the mud room in our house). However, my somehow my little brother got in there and wanted to give her a hug. My mom wasn't watching closely and even though I'm sure she gave plenty of warning (she would growl if she'd had enough), he was too young to know... so she bit him. Nothing bad that he needed stitches for, but it did break the skin. But my parents did not blame her and we kept her for the rest of her life. That is the type of attitude I will have toward our dog.

    Anyway, so thanks again for all the tips. I honestly had not thought I would want a puppy at all, but now I'm re-thinking that idea! I will start looking into breeders in the area for many of the breeds mentioned here.

    Leave a comment:


  • kasjordan
    replied
    Can't believe it took three pages for collies to be mentioned! Best kids dogs ever. grew up with collies, my brother learned to walk holding onto Taffy ;-) Friendly, love everybody, will nip heels of running kids but just to herd them not to bite. You can keep adding kids and they will love the next one just as much as the first one. Unless the collie had abuse or trust issues, there's not many I wouldn't trust.

    Leave a comment:


  • SaltyHooves
    replied
    Collies and Collie mixes are at the top of my list, right next to bulldog mixes. Goldens have so many skin issues and can be very hyperactive. I am wary of any purebred because of expensive health issues.

    I would look for an owner that has to give one up to get the older dog you want. It is also worth contacting an experienced trainer to help you evaluate your potential pet. Go to the Association of Pet Dog Trainers website and use the Trainer Search feature.

    Since you have a baby and will have more children, become educated on positive reinforcement, non violent training methods to ensure your kid(s) can safely control and interact with your dog. Check out http://www.dogstardaily.com

    Lots of good info on picking a dog and training it appropriately.

    I have had bad experiences working with rescues while having a child under 5. I was denied to adopt from 3 separate rescues even though I am an experienced professional trainer and foster. I finally just bought my pugglepoo from the amish. Not the best move, but I was tired of being denied a puppy.

    For the record: We adopted every one of our other dogs, our lizard, and two ducks. Our pony came from a rescue as well.

    Leave a comment:

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