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Am I wrong to be annoyed/bothered by this?

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  • Am I wrong to be annoyed/bothered by this?

    Am I wrong to be annoyed that someone brought their <5lb multipoopuppy to the public city dog park to "play?"

    Osa, my 9-month-old Ridgeback mix's immediate reaction (body language) was not, "oh, yay another dog!" but more like, "what is that? I'm pretty sure I want to eat it." I snapped her leash on right quick and we left, even though the dog's owners kept assuring me that she was fine.

    Um, no. Its not. My dog's DNA is hard-wired to kill small animals and one snap/shake and your tiny puppy is dead. I'm not willing to take that chance. Ever. Osa is perfectly fine around other dogs, happy and playful, not an aggressive bone in her body, and she does listen to me for the most part (we're a work in progress )

    BUT that thing, scampering around wearing a pink sweater, looks nothing like a dog she has ever seen. And I no amount of training would ever convince me to feel comfortable letting her "play" with an animal that small.


    So, if you want to own a dog that you you will always be able to hold in the palm of your hand that's fine, but plz don't let it run around with a bunch of "unknown" large dogs, at a public dog park. Please.

    OK rant over.
    Last edited by wcporter; Apr. 7, 2013, 11:46 AM. Reason: removing condescending lables
    Barn rat for life

  • #2
    I think the general rule at the dog park is the person with the dog who can't get along is at fault, not the people who own the dog that the others want to eat. What did the other big dogs do?

    It's a dog park. All dogs are allowed. If your dog wanted to eat the little dog, then you need to spend more time socializing your dog with little dogs, so your dog understands they're not eatable.

    I have a whole lot of issues with anyone bringing a young, presumably not yet fully vaccinated, puppy to a dog park, period, but that's a whole nother thread

    Comment


    • #3
      Am I wrong to be annoyed that someone brought their <5lb multiyorkiepoo puppy to the public city dog park to "play?"

      Osa, my 9-month-old Ridgeback mix's immediate reaction (body language) was not, "oh, yay another dog!" but more like, "what is that? I'm pretty sure I want to eat it." I snapped her leash on right quick and we left, even though the "guinea pig's" owners kept assuring me that said guinea pig was fine.

      Um, no. Its not. My dog's DNA is hard-wired to kill small animals and one snap/shake and your Poopsie is dead. I'm not willing to take that chance. Ever. Osa is perfectly fine around other dogs, happy and playful, not an aggressive bone in her body, and she does listen to me for the most part (we're a work in progress )

      BUT that thing, scampering around wearing a pink sweater, looks nothing like a dog she has ever seen. And I no amount of training would ever convince me to feel comfortable letting her "play" with an animal that small.


      So, if you want to own a dog that you you will always be able to hold in the palm of your hand that's fine, but plz don't let it run around with a bunch of "unknown" large dogs, WHILE WEARING A SWEATER, at a public dog park. Please.

      OK rant over
      huh? If you think your dog may kill smaller dogs, maybe just don't take it to the public dog park and let it loose unless there are rules preventing smaller dogs to be there.

      Comment


      • #4
        I can see your point, wc. This is why a local park has a small dog enclosure for dogs under 25# in addition to the larger Come-One-Come-All enclosure, no size requirements.

        Me? I hate dogparks. The only time I go there is to give lessons. I always come away with tons of business

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        • Original Poster

          #5
          "huh? If you think your dog may kill smaller dogs, maybe just don't take it to the public dog park and let it loose unless there are rules preventing smaller dogs to be there."


          I'm not talking about small dogs. I'm talking something the size of an actual guinea pig. Wearing a sweater.

          No damage was done. She sniffed it, got that look, so I clipped her up and left. I was not rude. No one made me leave. It was my choice. In fact, they kept telling me she is fine (meaning my dog). Maybe it would have been fine, but the margin or error seemed too small for me.

          I just never considered that someone would bring such a small animal into a dog park.

          For the record, I am not the only one who left after they came in. Someone with a greyhound, who was otherwise doing great and playing, also got nervous with that little thing running around and took her dog out.
          Barn rat for life

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          • #6
            Small or large it still smelt like a dog... your overreacting.

            Comment


            • #7
              it was your choice to leave, right? until and unless there are rules as to the size of the dog allowed, and the dress code, then yeah, i'd say you're over reacting. it's a dog park, you're going to get all kinds. that's one of the risks you run when going such places.
              Different Times Equestrian Ventures at Hidden Spring Ranch
              www.DifferentTimesEquestrianVentures.com

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              • Original Poster

                #8
                ok then. I'm overreacting. That's what I needed to hear.
                Barn rat for life

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                • #9
                  I think it isn't a black and white situation.

                  I had a 70lb GSD/Rottie mix whose best friend was a under 10lb Papillion. Actually the little one bossed her around, she was the "alpha" of the pair.

                  My dog also LOVED to chase squirrels, bunnies, other little fury animals.

                  Occasionally she would spy from a distance a "little fury animal" and start to run towards it at full speed during off leash hours in our local park - it was not always a squirrel. However, I did learn that once she got close enough to realize that the "little fury animal" was a mini long-haired dachshund, Chihuahua, or Yorkie she stopped immediately and went about her business.

                  She really wasn't interested in chasing other dogs, especially the little ones who she loved. She did scare some owners, as it is frightening to watch a huge dog run towards your little one, but I was relaxed because I knew it wasn't a problem ever. My dog was not a puppy at this time and had excellent recall. Her eyesight/sense of sell was not always good enough to discern what she was heading towards at a distance.

                  I understand that it is a two way street, and it is nice that you are concerned enough to remove your dog even though you did not want to.

                  This perhaps just illuminates another area where you guys needs some specific training.

                  My current dog has a real problem with a specific other dog that frequents our dog park. Neither dog instigated the situation in any kind of way that is obvious to me or to the other owner.

                  We trade off times that we go. Some days one or the other of us has to wait outside for a while. I am not at the stage of training where I can control this issue between the two of them so I work around it. I view that as my responsibility, albeit a pain in the neck, as she dos not have an issue with any of the other dogs in this way.

                  Nobody's "fault" just an issue that needs work.

                  Comment

                  • Original Poster

                    #10
                    So how might I go about working on something like that? I mean, to get to the point where I can be sure,while off-leash, that she wouldn't at the very least, even accidentally, maim such a small dog?

                    Her problem now, more than anything else, is not having more body awareness and knowing when to be "gentle" with small kids and more timid dogs. How does one "train" that? Or, does it just come with maturity?
                    Barn rat for life

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                    • #11
                      I think the sweater would worry me, because a lot of my Mini Schnauzer's squeaky toys were like that with fuzzy coats type parts, and I'm sure my boy would have thought the small dogs with sweaters were actually a new kind of toy too.

                      In fact he had a squeaky plush squirrel toy, and he dearly loved to chew on it. When he found a rather dried out and flat dead squirrel in the backyard he was carrying it around, and biting where the squeaky was in his real toy. Looking back, the confused look on his face because his 'squirrel' wasn't squeaking was kind of funny (not at the time though). Of course, the loud shriek I let out when I realized what he was chomping on convinced him to drop it. My dog went on appearance too, and didn't seem to realize a dead animal wasn't his plush squeaky toy.
                      Last edited by JanM; Apr. 6, 2013, 06:51 PM.
                      You can't fix stupid-Ron White

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by wcporter View Post
                        So how might I go about working on something like that? I mean, to get to the point where I can be sure,while off-leash, that she wouldn't at the very least, even accidentally, maim such a small dog?

                        Her problem now, more than anything else, is not having more body awareness and knowing when to be "gentle" with small kids and more timid dogs. How does one "train" that? Or, does it just come with maturity?
                        I don't know. My shepherd didn't need to be taught "gentle" but I did install a super strong recall on her because i found that if I could "call her off" any situation things never escalated to that point. I used steak and other human food to install the recall. She never received it otherwise and was highly motivated!

                        She had been abused prior to my taking her in to my home and was very very obedient from day one. Always watching and listening and what is my next command mom type of dog.

                        My current dog (black lab mixed with hound? herder? who knows what?) has a pretty weak recall so far, but I've only had her for a little over a month and she had no name so I couldn't even get her to realize I was talking to her at first.

                        Slow progress. We sit and down nicely. We "wait" well with eye contact. Recall not so much.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Sorry, but I'm a little put off by your description of the yorkiemutt. It's small, its parents should have been speutered, and its owners make it wear silly clothes. Completely not the fault of the dog. Yes, dog, not "that thing". Presumably it adds something of value to the lives of its owners, as your dog adds to yours.

                          Sorry - I don't have toy dogs now, but I hate it when people sneer at them.

                          I hate dog parks. Too many people with no judgment and even less attention span (they ignore their dog as they wander around on the phone).

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Mara View Post
                            Sorry, but I'm a little put off by your description of the yorkiemutt. It's small, its parents should have been speutered, and its owners make it wear silly clothes. Completely not the fault of the dog. Yes, dog, not "that thing". Presumably it adds something of value to the lives of its owners, as your dog adds to yours.
                            Yep. It's a dog. If your dog isn't safe around it, your dog is the problem.

                            I'm so glad I don't live anywhere that has dog parks.
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                            • #15
                              If I had a toy dog I would be very wary of brining it into a dog park, but that doesn't mean the rest of the world feels the same day. I know if I had my dog in a dog park and she reacted badly to another dog for no apparent reason, she would be the one to leave. In other words I think you did exactly the right thing. However, I don't think it is fair to be annoyed with the owners for bringing their tiny dog into an area that is meant for dogs no matter how small they are.

                              In my area there is a "controlled" dog park where all dogs must pass a temperament test before being allowed in. My dog has her test in a few weeks, so hopefully we'll start going there. I'm hoping a more controlled environment which is closely monitored by people other than the dogs owners will be a good place to socialize her a bit more. She currently only has one dog she regularly plays with.
                              "Choose to chance the rapids, and dare to dance the tides" - Garth Brooks
                              "With your permission, dear, I'll take my fences one at a time" - Maggie Smith, Downton Abbey

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                              • Original Poster

                                #16
                                Originally posted by Mara View Post
                                Sorry, but I'm a little put off by your description of the yorkiemutt. It's small, its parents should have been speutered, and its owners make it wear silly clothes. Completely not the fault of the dog. Yes, dog, not "that thing". Presumably it adds something of value to the lives of its owners, as your dog adds to yours.

                                Sorry - I don't have toy dogs now, but I hate it when people sneer at them.

                                I hate dog parks. Too many people with no judgment and even less attention span (they ignore their dog as they wander around on the phone).
                                Sorry, I dont mean to sneer at it.

                                I do think I have a prejudice to those types of toy dogs, but it definitely stems from the owners/breeders, not the dog itself. I have a problem with people who make these little dogs to specifically play the role of "dolly dress-up" to be totted around like a baby and treated as such. But thats another topic altogether.

                                These young people at the park were not that, I dont think. Just clueless IMO, to how careless they were being in regard to their dog's safety.

                                ETA: I am not saying, btw, that all people with toy dogs treat them like coddled babies. Just some. Like I said, I definitely have a prejudice. Not saying its a good thing.
                                Last edited by wcporter; Apr. 6, 2013, 04:29 PM. Reason: ETA
                                Barn rat for life

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                                • #17
                                  I think you did the right thing by leaving. Your dog might out muscle my frou frou dog but my dog would likely send yours running with his tail between his legs. She thinks she is a rottie. Nothing more badass than a Napoleon complex.
                                  McDowell Racing Stables

                                  Home Away From Home

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                                  • #18
                                    It is nice that you collected your dog and left but unless there is a separate enclosure for small dogs ALL socialized dogs are welcome in a dog park, sweaters or not. Dogs can tell a dog is a dog, with or without a sweater. And the breed is immaterial. YOUR dog is the one that needs work, do not take dog aggressive dogs to a dog park! If it is a size issue perhaps a muzzle and an extremely good recall is in order and when small dogs come in, your dog gets put on a leash at the minimum. Next stop, training dog not to eat small creatures, whatever they are or whatever they may be wearing.
                                    Every mighty oak was once a nut that stood its ground.

                                    Proud Closet Canterer! Member Riders with Fibromyalgia clique.

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                                    • #19
                                      I think the sweater would worry me


                                      It depends. Need more info.

                                      cardigan or pullover?
                                      acrylic or natural fibre?
                                      pastel or bold colors?

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by wcporter View Post
                                        So how might I go about working on something like that? I mean, to get to the point where I can be sure,while off-leash, that she wouldn't at the very least, even accidentally, maim such a small dog?

                                        Her problem now, more than anything else, is not having more body awareness and knowing when to be "gentle" with small kids and more timid dogs. How does one "train" that? Or, does it just come with maturity?
                                        ****
                                        I can see your side of this. I have a Ridgeback/Boerboel female, 11 months old. DD has a little Yorkie. Even at my house I worried about the interaction. Yorkie is feisty...BB/RB is a bit snarky with little dogs. I think you did the right thing by leaving...Yorkie people were a bit irresponsible, too, but I've never enjoyed the concept of a dog park!!! As far as "outgrowing" or "training out" the prey drive in a Ridgeback...I'm not so sure THAT is possible. Major obedience training might help, but she will always be a dog with a high prey drive. JMO
                                        www.crosscreeksporthorses.com
                                        Breeders of Painted Thoroughbreds and Uniquely Painted Irish Sport Horses in Northeast Oklahoma

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