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Do little dogs find their brain later than bigger dogs?

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  • Do little dogs find their brain later than bigger dogs?

    My Shepherd has been a good dog since he came home as an itty bitty. Grew up with collies and don't remember any of them not being pretty good dogs all their lives. I had a Jack Russell mix but he was a big dog in a smaller body it seemed. This dang chihuahua mix is Such. A. Bad. Dog.
    Loveable as can be...so happy to see people, his tail looks like helicopter rotors.
    ZERO attention span. He's just now starting to realize that NO! means stop what you're doing. He's actually getting decent at that, but he still tries the behavior (diving on the cat and stealing her food, swiping socks from the basket, scooping a hair band that fell etc) over and over- like he doesn't realize the no means all the time, not just at that second. Alll of these can happen over ten times a day lol.
    He's been AWFUL to house train. He will pee in the litterbox if you put him in it, maybe twice he's walked to it himself. He's taken out alllllllllllll the time, usually he will potty outside but then 10 minutes later, he might just as easily turn around and go in the house again.
    I do see progress, (he's 6 months old now) I know he will get it eventually but the culture shock from a GSD to a little Chi mix is driving me insane lol. He's lucky he's cute :-)
    Kerri

  • #2
    It's not the size, it's the breed. You just can't compare the learning abilities of herding breeds to a terrier or a chichuahua. Plus, herding dogs were bred to work with people. The other two, not so much!

    Comment


    • #3
      My chi is super smart and willing; she learns her commands quickly and doesn't forget them no matter how much time goes by. Super sensitive. I wanted her to be well trained for her own safety and she's done really well from the start.

      //defending chis.
      “Most people do not listen with the intent to understand; they listen with the intent to reply.” Stephen R. Covey

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      • Original Poster

        #4
        LOL CBM, I *wanted* this one to be well trained too Your Western chis must be smarter than these Mid Atlantic ones lol
        Kerri

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        • #5
          It's not a matter of intelligence, it's more a matter of motiviation to please. Breeds that are more motivated to please are easier to train. Chi's are very intelligent and often very good at getting their way!

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          • #6
            It's breed and individual temperament, not size. Chi's are not exactly known for their trainability
            .

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            • #7
              It's not a matter of intelligence, it's more a matter of motiviation to please. Breeds that are more motivated to please are easier to train. Chi's are very intelligent and often very good at getting their way!
              yeah, I'd suggest you try a different approach than the constant NO NO NO thing.
              Working dogs may actually deeply care if you're not pleased and respond to NO just because you said so, but other breeds ask, instead "Why should I?" and "What's in it for me?" and if you don't answer these questions correctly they decide to not listen to you.
              Try teaching the dog WHAT TO DO in a proactive way instead of waiting for the dog to be bad and then shrieking NO at him. Believe me, these dogs are very intelligent- possibly more intelligent than your average GSD- and you just have to figure out how to motivate them to do what you want. Some of these dogs may actually think it's fun to do things that make you shriek NO at them- they like to manipulate and be in control. Look I can make Mom yell NO! she's very well-trained for a human.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by kasjordan View Post
                LOL CBM, I *wanted* this one to be well trained too Your Western chis must be smarter than these Mid Atlantic ones lol
                LOL Mine is totally food motivated, she'll do and learn anything for food, and she's hyper bonded to me, like your stalker is to you. If I grumble at her at all she melts. So I have good tools in my training tool belt!

                Yours will settle down!

                A squirt gun is our "no" enforcer here, works like a charm.
                “Most people do not listen with the intent to understand; they listen with the intent to reply.” Stephen R. Covey

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                • Original Poster

                  #9
                  Originally posted by wendy View Post
                  yeah, I'd suggest you try a different approach than the constant NO NO NO thing.

                  Try teaching the dog WHAT TO DO in a proactive way instead of waiting for the dog to be bad and then shrieking NO at him. Believe me, these dogs are very intelligent- possibly more intelligent than your average GSD- and you just have to figure out how to motivate them to do what you want. Some of these dogs may actually think it's fun to do things that make you shriek NO at them- they like to manipulate and be in control. Look I can make Mom yell NO! she's very well-trained for a human.
                  How do you teach him not to scoop up anything that accidentally falls on the ground? Or not to climb on daughter's bed and steal her clothing (other than teach daughter to use hamper-which is a pointless exercise half the time lol) Or not to pounce on cat when it comes to visit? Other than correcting the action when it happens? We've been carrying little treats to try to direct attention to us and stop the behavior (along with a stern no also). Sometimes he will decide he wants the treat, others ,nah. He gets crated when we're not able to be beside him so he doesn't have the opportunity to do all those things without some sort of reprimand- but as to teaching him WHAT TO DO rather than what he does........T'aint working very well.
                  Kerri

                  Comment

                  • Original Poster

                    #10
                    Originally posted by cowboymom View Post
                    LOL Mine is totally food motivated, she'll do and learn anything for food, and she's hyper bonded to me, like your stalker is to you. If I grumble at her at all she melts. So I have good tools in my training tool belt!

                    Yours will settle down!

                    A squirt gun is our "no" enforcer here, works like a charm.
                    This one can take or leave food- sometimes it helps, sometimes not. But your squirt gun idea! Oh yeah, I see a stop at the Dollar Store tonight! That could be the perfect thing, he might not even know we're the ones holding it lol. He absolutely needs some kind of deterrent in his beady little mind ;-)
                    I am seeing some improvement, we always at least get a glance now when we say no! Ha! I know he'll settle, I just look at my boy and think how nice it would be if we just had two of HIM!!!
                    Kerri

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      He sounds like a whirling dervish!

                      This might be bad, but I use stinky cat treats as my training treats for Pocket-they're Purina Whisker Lickins and they reek and they're tiny. She will do anything for one of those! I have them stashed everywhere. All I have to do is crinkle the bag and she runs to me.
                      “Most people do not listen with the intent to understand; they listen with the intent to reply.” Stephen R. Covey

                      Comment

                      • Original Poster

                        #12
                        That description was made for him! I've never seen him walk anywhere....he trots or full blown gallop. He bounces almost as high as my shoulders, and I'm 5'9. If you're carrying something in your hands, keep ahold- because there will be a white and brown blur flying by in midair to try to take it. No lie ;-) I had to pull a cat food can off his tooth that he had embedded in it. He eats wood chips. Constantly, and we have a wood stove so you know how many wood chips find their way to the ground. I don't know why I like him lol.
                        Kerri

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          This sounds familiar! Pocket used to jump up like a trout out of the water and bite my sleeves (or hand) to get my attention! She ripped holes in a couple shirts doing that but she did stop it eventually! She also eats kindling so I'm constantly having to take wood away too, I keep those cow hooves around for constant chewing so she won't eat bad things. She's settled a lot in the last couple month, hopefully yours will too! I think they're so fun, they're just energy everywhere. Pocket run in circles over and over and over, just circles... as fast as she can go. It's so cute. She rides on my shoulder in the car like a freaking parrot, if I go further than down the street she has to be taken off my shoulder. She barks at everything and loves to chase those wild turkeys. My big dogs watch her antics like
                          “Most people do not listen with the intent to understand; they listen with the intent to reply.” Stephen R. Covey

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Not terribly familiar with training chis, but instead of correcting the behavior, why not just redirect him with a command. Instead of "No!" how about "Sit!", then reward THAT behavior. May or may not work, but distracting him AND rewarding for good behavior may get him focused on you more and start thinking.

                            I've had success using a re-directing kind of command to break bad behavior...most successfully teaching a barker to speak. I turned an obnoxious behavior into a fun game that, if he waited for me to give the command, he got uber praise for doing something he loved. Don't know if anything like that will work on this dog, but it would be worth a shot!
                            Amanda

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by kasjordan View Post
                              How do you teach him not to scoop up anything that accidentally falls on the ground? Or not to climb on daughter's bed and steal her clothing (other than teach daughter to use hamper-which is a pointless exercise half the time lol) Or not to pounce on cat when it comes to visit? Other than correcting the action when it happens? We've been carrying little treats to try to direct attention to us and stop the behavior (along with a stern no also). Sometimes he will decide he wants the treat, others ,nah. He gets crated when we're not able to be beside him so he doesn't have the opportunity to do all those things without some sort of reprimand- but as to teaching him WHAT TO DO rather than what he does........T'aint working very well.
                              What Wendy said about +R.

                              If you have not learned how to shape him, or use a clicker, read up on it. If you leave food down all the time, feed him meals and teach him a retrieve using his food. If you teach him to bring you things, he will either swipe them and bring them to you or it will be less fun so he will quit. If he's not a great eater this may help with that.

                              You have a "not" in every sentence, take that out. Instead of saying "Or not to pounce on cat when it comes to visit?", re-phrase that and say "what do I want him to do when the cat comes to visit?" Sit? Front? Come to heel?

                              It's not about the breed, or the size, it's about what you are inadvertently teaching him. Remember that even negative behavior is behaivor....and what you reinforce will be repeated. So if swiping a hair band gets him attention, and attention is rewarding, he's going to keep doing that. If the attention is telling him no, it's still attention. Decide what you want him TO DO, and then reward that.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                double post
                                Last edited by threedogpack; Mar. 5, 2013, 11:58 AM. Reason: double post

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  COTH just made me do a double post in another thread too.

                                  I have a noise I make at the dogs when I want to avert them from the evil they're about to do-I make the noise and give them a treat or pet them or take them outside real quick. So when I see trouble coming I can stop it before it happens-the cats really appreciate it! If I drop something I don't want them to snarf up I stomp my feet to scare them away! lol

                                  I wondered if he was doing it for the attention-Big Dog is getting all the positive attention and maybe this is the little niche he's found for himself.
                                  “Most people do not listen with the intent to understand; they listen with the intent to reply.” Stephen R. Covey

                                  Comment

                                  • Original Poster

                                    #18
                                    I'm sure part of it is attention, be it good or bad. But he gets alot, he follows Skyler around like a well....puppy ;-) He's with her constantly, on her bed, in her lap, on her shoulder lol. It's when he wanders off and plays with Grizz or trots over to the water bowl...he finds SOMEthing to get into no matter what. We've been doing the treat redirect, maybe I will add a noise to it to condition him to that too. I am getting a water pistol or two though...the little turd has gotten into the habit of flying down the hall, leaping onto my bed and burying himself in my hair and face, licking to beat the band.....to tell me that she just let him out and he's wide awake.....and has wet paws.....lol....Maybe little doggie handcuffs...
                                    Kerri

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                                    • #19
                                      Don't have time to read other posts, but in general, train and confine, until your dog has learned some manners, no matter the age, sex or breed.

                                      Dog is doing what loose dogs with time and space on their paws do, they do what they want when they want it, unless trained not to.
                                      To train, confine, don't put the dog where it can do wrong, then try to punish after the fact.

                                      Little bitty dogs have a much smaller space bubble to understand what space is.
                                      A lab will take the whole room is it's house not to soil and go to a far off room.
                                      A chi will think the corner of the room is fine for a bathroom, far from it's place of residence by the couch.

                                      Dog proof where you keep your dog and only give more and more freedom as the dog earns it.

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                                      • #20
                                        My new dog wasn't too interested in treats so, at a friend's suggestion, I cut up one of those Nature's Balance rolls into treat sized pieces and he LOVES them. He much more motivated for those treats.
                                        "Last time I picked your feet, you broke my toe!"

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