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my old girl is getting pretty stiff--best joint supps or food for her?

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  • my old girl is getting pretty stiff--best joint supps or food for her?

    my sabrina is over ten, a rescue who is slowing down. lately she's not been able to move her rear legs independently going down the stairs, so scoots down on her bum. i've carried her a few times, but she's a bit too heavy for that to be safe for long.
    she thinks i'm trying to kill her with supplements or pills so hope to find somethign she'll like which will make her feel more comfortable.

    she's a northern species who prefers to spend her days curled up in the snow and nights next to my bed.

  • #2
    It sounds like your dog is feeling genuinely uncomfortable from age. I would go to your vet and get a prescriptions for something like rimadyl or metacam. I put my dog on metacam and it has made a huge difference in her quality of life. Huge. My dog gets her metacam on a piece of bread, so no pills.

    Comment


    • #3
      Of course personal recommendations are all just anecdotal, and ditto talking to your vet, buy my vet recommended Glycoflex III for my oldest dog, and the difference was noticeable and amazing. I added it to my next-oldest, a Cairn with luxating patella, and she became much more confident physically and started jumping up on furniture and really pouring on the speed running around outside, rearing/sitting up a lot, etc. in ways she hadn't in a while. So that's two out of two for me with an oral supplement.

      My initial instinct was to go out and research on my own and look at old standards like Cosequin, etc., and comparison shop and so forth, but I'm really glad I tried GlycoFlex III right off. GlycoFlex has 3 formulas to match how much intervention is needed -- III is the "strongest" (has the most supplements compared to I and II).

      I know there's a lot of skepticism about the efficacy of oral joint supplements, though.
      If thou hast a sorrow, tell it not to the arrow, tell it to thy saddlebow, and ride on, singing. -- King Alfred the Great

      Comment


      • #4
        Been using Nupro Joint Supplement for the past couple of years for my 8yo Irish Wolfhound. Can be found in pet supply stores, but cheapest on Amazon. 5 lbs is $35 and lasts a long, long time.
        http://www.amazon.com/Nutri-Pet-Rese.../dp/B000084EEE
        Bought it because my gal was on a non-Gluc/Chond food, but I've just found a new food that includes it that she can stomach.

        However, I'll still keep giving it to her. 8 is old for a big girl. She leaps around on it. Without, a noticeable difference. One caveat - there are 2 Nurpros - the gold label DOES NOT have gluc/chond. Make sure you buy the silver label. Oh, and it stinks - like ground liver. She lovvvvves it!
        But he thought, "This procession has got to go on." So he walked more proudly than ever, as his noblemen held high the train that wasn't there at all. H.C.Anderson

        Comment


        • #5
          Had my 12 year old Heeler on Cosequin DS but a few months ago he really tanked in terms of his hips (I was having to carry all 57 pounds of him up and down our really steep stairs). Vet said he didn't even have to x-ray to know how bad the arthritis was, he could feel how "crunchy" they were. We tried Rimadyl (carprofen) with a pain reliever (tramadol) first and I didn't see any change in him after a couple of weeks. We then went to prednisone and doxy (just in case it was Lyme disease) and he was much better almost immediately but I didn't want to leave him on prednisone permanently and the side effects were making him drive me nuts. He went back to crippled within a couple of days of stopping those meds and we've now switched him to Previcox and he's still on oral supplement and fish oil and he's doing much better, is now able to make it up and down the stairs on his own probably 75% of the time. I did ask about Adequan as well but I'm not comfortable trying to give him shots myself so we went the Previcox route first. It's pricey but if it helps keep him comfortable I'll just have to make do.
          It's not about the color of the ribbon but the quality of the ride. Having said that, I'd like the blue one please!

          Comment


          • #6
            Is this animal a dog or cat? If she is a dog, you may want to look into Rimadyl or Meloxicam...sounds like you need the big guns, not just a supplement.

            Comment


            • #7
              you should get a diagnosis first. Not all apparent lamenesses of older dogs are caused by arthritis. Throwing supplements for arthritis at a dog who actually has a torn ligament, a disc problem, or a neurological or muscle disorder, or even lyme disease, is not helpful.

              Comment


              • #8
                I thought my dogs problem was arthritis. It turned out it was a deteriorating joint. Surgery helped a ton but I still had to have her on Rimadyl. I put her on Cosequin and have been able to take her off the Rimadyl. She will be 13 this month and is running and playing.
                Whatever you can do, or dream you can, begin it. Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it. Goethe

                Comment


                • #9
                  Adequan, hands down.
                  Save the NSAIDs for when she gets stiff even after the loading dose of Adequan. Works out to about 25.00 mo, if you were to compare the yrly cost to NSAIDs which can be up to 100.00+ per mo.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I would have the vet check her out and agree with starting with the Adequan and saving the NSAIDS for later. Mine are both 11 and on Adequan, fish oil, and fluid action HA and bounce off the walls. They are followed closely by the vet at this age and get bloodwork and an exam about every 4-5 months. Your vet can help you determine what is the best protocol for what he/she finds.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I started my dog on Adequan after "meh" results with NSAIDs. The difference is remarkable! She also is on oral joint sup, but the adequan seems to have made her a few years younger!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        The only truly clinically proven things to improve arthritis symptoms in dogs is reducing the dog's body weight and feeding high doses of fish oil. 3 to 4% of the diet should be fish oil, by dry weight, in order for you see an effect. Weigh the dog's usual amount of kibble and calculate how much to give. This is A LOT more than the usual suggestions of fish oil supplementation to improve general health.

                        Many people, however, find that oral supplements of various kinds produce dramatic improvements in their dogs- it's kind of trial and error which one works for YOUR dog.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I haven't read all the replies, but my dog is super stiff and sore throughout her back/hips...she was hit by a car 3 years ago and the arthritis has progressively gotten worse.

                          I've started her on a tab of Tumeric a day, along with Krill fish oil, both of which have natural anti-inflammatory properties. The difference in her is amazing! I do have Metacam to use when she's really bad and needs an extra kick.

                          I was leary about trying the Tumeric and didn't really think it would do anything but within in a week, she was walking around almost normal again. Although I definitely suggest an appointment with your vet.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I have a 12 year old Irish Wolfhound mix and she does very well with fluid HA. My vet has given her Adequan but so far a dose of HA every other day and making sure she is walked and is not gaining weight works well for her. She is ancient for a big dog and is quite comfortable.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by stolen virtue View Post
                              I have a 12 year old Irish Wolfhound mix and she does very well with fluid HA. My vet has given her Adequan but so far a dose of HA every other day and making sure she is walked and is not gaining weight works well for her. She is ancient for a big dog and is quite comfortable.
                              12 yrs for an Irish Wolfhound is Great! You must be doing something right!

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by jetsmom View Post
                                12 yrs for an Irish Wolfhound is Great! You must be doing something right!
                                We got her from the local pound 5 years ago. She had been returned 7 times and she is so sweet. My son picked her out, she is big but she got along with our other dog so we brought her home. I think being a mix is helpful for her.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by Rallycairn View Post
                                  Of course personal recommendations are all just anecdotal, and ditto talking to your vet, buy my vet recommended Glycoflex III for my oldest dog, and the difference was noticeable and amazing. I added it to my next-oldest, a Cairn with luxating patella, and she became much more confident physically and started jumping up on furniture and really pouring on the speed running around outside, rearing/sitting up a lot, etc. in ways she hadn't in a while. So that's two out of two for me with an oral supplement.

                                  My initial instinct was to go out and research on my own and look at old standards like Cosequin, etc., and comparison shop and so forth, but I'm really glad I tried GlycoFlex III right off. GlycoFlex has 3 formulas to match how much intervention is needed -- III is the "strongest" (has the most supplements compared to I and II).

                                  I know there's a lot of skepticism about the efficacy of oral joint supplements, though.
                                  My girl has been on the GlycoFlex III for four years. In fact, I can't really say if it helps or not since all I know is she's *knock on wood* in good shape, and wasn't bad before we started it! I had started the GF I way back when she was five and limped occasionally. She blew out her knee when she was six, so I ramped right up to the GF III then (she had knee surgery). She's now 10 and runs, jumps and plays like crazy, despite back arthritis. So I certainly think the GF doesn't hurt!

                                  (This reminds me, I have to order more. I get it online from KV Supply as I think they have the best price and great service, too. But it's a very cost-effective product anyway; half a chewable tab for 44 lb./daily. I get the 120-tab bottle so it lasts for ages. And Sunny thinks they taste fabulous!)
                                  "Horses lend us the wings we lack." ~ Pam Brown

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    My boy (9ish) was looking really bad. Limping and creeky. I thought he was going to the one way trip to the vet I was feeding him great food and he had the runs bad.

                                    I decided it would be easier for me to just try changing his food one more time. I also added a supp. He now acts like a pup again.

                                    I feed him

                                    http://www.smartpakequine.com/canine...ior-2925p.aspx and

                                    http://www.smartpakequine.com/wellne...ors-2549p.aspx
                                    Draumr Hesta Farm
                                    "Wenn Du denkst es geht nicht mehr, kommt von irgendwo ein kleines Licht daher"
                                    Member of the COTH Ignorant Disrepectful F-bombs!*- 2Dogs Farm

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      My parents' beagle mix is very stiff and slow, and a bit hind-end wobbly. Went to the expensive vet for a full work-up (blood, x-rays, the whole shebang) and she's...perfectly fine, just old. They recommended a low-dose aspirin (like the kind for humans taking blood-thinning aspirin) and to make sure she keeps up exercise. Not LONG walks if she can't deal with it, but as much walks as she will tolerate, on a regular schedule. I'd check with a vet before any kind of NSAIDs, otc or prescription, but it might just be aches of age. Even for arthritis, exercise (LIGHT exercise if necessary) can help the joints stay healthy and ease the stiffness that causes some of the restricted movement.

                                      And of course watch the diet. Especially with my senior (Puff), I make sure he's not too fat and not too thin and gets the right kind of fats, which can help with the joints. He doesn't get anything special (except low-fat yogurt if he has tummy issues, like he just did from the antibiotic after their teeth cleaning adventure) but I feed a good food and make sure he gets as much walking as he will tolerate. Keeping dogs moving and exercising, even if it's only a couple short walks a day, seems to help a lot when they're seniors.
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                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Try Wags tablets, they are amazing and you see results with just a couple of days, they will send you a free 2 week trial BUT they base the amount of packs they send you on the weight of the dog so when you order your free sample put the highest weight they have so they send you 3 packs

                                        http://www.petresearch.com/product-info/# scroll down and the free sample area will be on the right.
                                        The one good thing about repeating your mistakes is that you know when to cringe.

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