• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse
1 of 2 < >

Event Announcements now available FREE to all registered users

We just reconfigured the Event Announcements forum to be available as a free service for all registered forum users. See the thread stuck at the top of that forum for more information.
2 of 2 < >

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Looking forward to dog trainer coming on Tuesday - new dog PULLS

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Looking forward to dog trainer coming on Tuesday - new dog PULLS

    We love our new dog, but OMG, he PULLS. He is so anxious to say hello to other dogs that he has yanked me off my feet twice. It is not at all aggressive (one he sniffs, he goes on his merry way) but he is SO crazy to get over to the other dog. I'm using a harness and a prong collar to have some fighting chance!

    Trainer is coming to the house on Tuesday - whew! I hope she has plans we can follow!
    I realize that I'm generalizing here, but as is often the case when I generalize, I don't care. ~ Dave Barry

  • #2
    Do you have a Sporn halter? Won't teach him not to pull, but will diffuse his force tremendously, giving you some relief while you train.
    If thou hast a sorrow, tell it not to the arrow, tell it to thy saddlebow, and ride on, singing. -- King Alfred the Great

    Comment


    • #3
      Gentle leader!
      Life-long horse lover, dreaming of the day when I have one of my very own.

      Comment

      • Original Poster

        #4
        I thought about going out and getting a Halti/gentle leader type, but at this point will wait and see what the trainer says. I will do whatever necessary to stop the pulling. DD can't walk him (she is tiny.)
        I realize that I'm generalizing here, but as is often the case when I generalize, I don't care. ~ Dave Barry

        Comment


        • #5
          I think of it like lunging a horse. If you are behind them directly then a horse can drag you around. But if you are at the right angle you can pull a horse off its feet.

          A dog is smaller then a horse.

          It has been awhile since I have trained dogs, but this method worked for me every time. If you stand directly behind a dog they will pull and since nothing changes except that they get to go toward what they want they continue to pull.

          Walk dog in a big open space. As dog is about to hit the end of the leash head in the other direction at an angle. The angle will give you some leverage and the dog will hit the end of the leash and spin around a bit. Look at dog like he is nuts.

          Repeat. Every time the dog is about to hit the end of the leash and pull turn on your heel at an angle.

          IGNORE.

          Every time the dog lets the leash go slack and comes back to you PRAISE.

          A smart dog learns very quickly where the end of the leash is and that hitting the end results in him being yo yo'd. You don't have to yell at him or say anything or correct him so it isn't really associated with you. The dog figures out where his boundries are and you can start your heeling training by praising him if he comes back to you.

          I always did this in a regular collar, we didn't have all the extra fancy stuff back then and I wouldn't want to use a chain for it.
          http://weanieeventer.blogspot.com/

          Comment


          • #6
            Harnesses were made to pull against. Your best best is a plain flat martingale collar, Gentle Leader or a small prong collar, and the ONLY way he gets to go anywhere is if there's little or no tension on the leash. If he pulls, you plant yourself until he stops pulling. If he's really obnoxious, you can use a sharp pop on the leash with the martingale collar or a flat buckle collar, not with the others.

            Just like with a horse, sometimes a well-timed snap of the lead brings them to their senses, for a minute anyway.

            Once the lead is slack and/or he's given you a microsecond of attention, then he can go forward. The minute he lunges, you stay put. You can help get his attention aon you with some super special treats - deli ham or hot dog or something. And he only gets it when he's choosing you over the other dog or person out there.

            Good luck!


            eta, yes also to the changes of direction - keep him guessing. YOU get to dictate where and when he goes, he can politely request to go sniff, but he doesn't get to dictate.

            Comment

            • Original Poster

              #7
              Thanks for the great suggestions!
              I realize that I'm generalizing here, but as is often the case when I generalize, I don't care. ~ Dave Barry

              Comment


              • #8
                I followed the technique enjoytheride described with my lab when I adopted him. The obedience class I took used that technique and it worked great. FWIW, when I was training my dog I didn't have much of an open area to work him in so I had to use that technique on the sidewalk and it was still effective. Good luck!
                Cascadia- OTTB mare. 04/04-05/10
                If love could have saved you, you would have lived forever

                Comment


                • #9
                  I've had and seen a lot of success with prong collars.
                  “Most people do not listen with the intent to understand; they listen with the intent to reply.” Stephen R. Covey

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    FWIW teaching a dog to heel has less to do with the equipment and more to do with the technique. I clip my leashes to my waist because it is easier to train the heel with a stationary object (my body) that doesn't reward pulling even a little bit. Your hand does -it is weak and gives a bit before you stop the pull.

                    I walk my dogs -Rhodesian Ridgebacks -on harnesses because I find them healthier for the dog than attaching the leash to the collar and they did not pull. Yoshi is 115 and he gets walked on a harness.

                    Paula
                    He is total garbage! Quick! Hide him on my trailer (Petstorejunkie).

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Short term - try a halti or gentle leader. They work miracles with dogs that pull.
                      Long term - learn clicker training.
                      Crayola Posse - Pine Green
                      Whinnie Pine (June 4, 1977 - April 29, 2008)
                      Autumn Caper (April 27, 1989 - May 24, 2015)
                      Murphy (April 28, 1994 - May 5, 2017)

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I put the most important statement. Dogs will always pull against tension. I would add that the collar should be at the top of the neck, where the throat latch would, just behind the ears; not down around the base of the neck.

                        Also if the dog is treat motivated, keep some small, yummy treats in your hand and when you tell him to heel, come, stay what ever word you use or click for him to NOT pull to greet the other dog, reward.

                        Originally posted by saje View Post
                        Harnesses were made to pull against. Your best best is a plain flat martingale collar, Gentle Leader or a small prong collar, and the ONLY way he gets to go anywhere is if there's little or no tension on the leash. If he pulls, you plant yourself until he stops pulling. If he's really obnoxious, you can use a sharp pop on the leash with the martingale collar or a flat buckle collar, not with the others.

                        Just like with a horse, sometimes a well-timed snap of the lead brings them to their senses, for a minute anyway.

                        Once the lead is slack and/or he's given you a microsecond of attention, then he can go forward. The minute he lunges, you stay put. You can help get his attention aon you with some super special treats - deli ham or hot dog or something. And he only gets it when he's choosing you over the other dog or person out there.

                        Good luck!


                        eta, yes also to the changes of direction - keep him guessing. YOU get to dictate where and when he goes, he can politely request to go sniff, but he doesn't get to dictate.
                        www.facebook.com/doggonegoodgoodies
                        http://doggonebakedgoods.com/

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I have a puller, too... he's a big young lab that had virtually no training when we got him at 1 year old. At home he is fairly good, but out in public he can be a beast! I've had the best success with a gentle leader, but two hikes ago, he pulled on it so much during a group hike (I couldn't exactly school him or take him home) that he rubbed through his nose and was bleeding!!!! He is one tough dog and didn't think that wow my nose is sore maybe I'd better stop pulling!!! It took forever to heal.

                          At home I have a lot of success with changing directions.... letting him hit the end of the lead... walking him nest to a wall and putting a knee into his chest/face if he tries to come too far forward. But the problem is when we go out in public he is a million times stronger and totally forgets his brain. Sigh.
                          http://www.leakycreek.com/
                          http://leakycreek.wordpress.com/ Rainbows & Mourning Doves Blog
                          John P. Smith II 1973-2009 Love Always
                          Father, Husband, Friend, Firefighter- Cancer Sucks- Cure Melanoma

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Wait for your trainer. They will take you and your dog into consideration and will help you learn technique with whatever method and equipment they recommend. Until then, changing directions and also simply coming to a dead stop when Dog begins to pull are certainly the safest and most effective options. I'd hold off on the headcollar devices--unless your trainer advocates its use and shows you how to fit and use it correctly, you could do damage.

                            Bottom line is that no matter what you use, your dog needs to learn that any pulling at all is not acceptable. To get there in all situations is a journey that takes some time, since "no pull" is a fluid command-not black and white like Sit or Come. Discuss in depth the methodology of this training with your trainer.

                            I tell my clients to imagine their 80 year old grandmother walking the dog on a buckle collar and a silk ribbon lead - that's the goal. This visualization seems to help them in their awareness of circumstances likely to cause pulling or bolting or lunging.

                            I find that success is directly proportional to awareness of and reaction to the dog's movement on the lead, from the moment you snap that lead on If you want a polite silk ribbon dog, you must work hard for it, no matter which technique (clicker, conventional) or equipment (headcollar, prong, buckle collar) you use.

                            Comment

                            • Original Poster

                              #15
                              We practiced the quick unexpected turns today! It really helped!
                              I realize that I'm generalizing here, but as is often the case when I generalize, I don't care. ~ Dave Barry

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by Guin View Post
                                He is so anxious to say hello to other dogs that he has yanked me off my feet twice. It is not at all aggressive (one he sniffs, he goes on his merry way) but he is SO crazy to get over to the other dog.!
                                He now expects and INSISTS on meeting other dogs he sees, because it sounds like you've allowed it at least once in the past-sometimes, that's all it takes. Save the socializing for the yard and a few well-chosen friends, or the dog park (I hate them, but that's me).

                                Absolutely no socializing with other dogs (or even humans if it causes him to lose his marbles) when on lead--no exceptions until he is truly rehabilitated, using the training methods your trainer advocates.

                                As an owner on the other side of the street walking my intact male 96 lb. Lab, 75 lb. Berner, and 2 JRTs, there is nothing worse than encountering an out of control dog dragging its owner over to me Bad things can ensue. Its imperative that you maintain control of your dog and know that not all other dogs particularly want to meet him, and same with their owners. This should be an acknowledged universal tenet of dog ownership.

                                I teach my clients the "no socialization on lead" rule right away, since it is the kindest and easiest way to avoid the problems with pulling that you are experiencing. Simply put, whenever your dog is onlead, you two are in your own little no-pulling loose-lead bubble, be it on the street or at the vet's office.

                                And if you are on the receiving end of uncontrolled dog attention, do what you have to do to prevent it-cross the street, retreat up someone's driveway, turn and run away, holler at the miscreant owner in your best She Who Must Be Obeyed voice, whatever you have you have to do to prevent contact.

                                You can explain that your dog is in training later Or not--there are a couple of dog owners in my suburban neighborhood who think I'm a high-riding bitch, and that's just fine with me as it keeps them and their dogs just moving right along

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by Guin View Post
                                  We practiced the quick unexpected turns today! It really helped!
                                  Great! You may not walk as far, but you can be walking for just as long. Just stop if you get dizzy

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    I really like teaching an "eyes on me" cue and smart, food-motivated dogs pick it up FAST. Pretty much every time they look at you, say whatever cue you want to use and shove a treat in their mouth. Once you have it installed, when you see them take a look at something you can redirect them. Eventually they get the idea that it's easier to just pay close attention to you the whole way!
                                    "Things turn out best for the people who make the best of the way things turn out." ~John Wooden

                                    Phoenix Animal Rescue

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      I've joined the clicker cult and I have to say it's helped TREMENDOUSLY with my 55lb pit-type-mutt and her pulling. We're not quite there yet, but we do plenty of "walk, click, treat, turn around, click, treat, walk," and I've progressively been able to get farther and farther on my walks in the allotted time. If she gets really beastly/distracted/overbearing, we either stop until she settles down and comes back to me, or we turn around and walk in circles.

                                      For normal walks, she goes in a standard red nylon martingale collar with a 4ft leather leash. When I'm somewhere more stimulating, like the park or barn, I use one of the pull-proof harnesses that clips in the front, so that when she pulls, she gets turned around.

                                      It's a long road with dogs who have already learned to pull, but it's definitely worth the hard work in the end (I hope...).

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by Rallycairn View Post
                                        Do you have a Sporn halter? Won't teach him not to pull, but will diffuse his force tremendously, giving you some relief while you train.
                                        We've got one of the Sporn no-pull harnesses for our dog, and it's been great. Other than her chewing through the mesh She's more of a puller out of wanting to go faster than we necessarily want to walk. We've been working on the whole "be a tree" idea when she starts pulling--just stop, and in my case, I've been reinforcing verbally with "whoa" until she stops and there's slack on the lead, then I ask her to "walk on." She's smart, so it's been pretty effective with her.
                                        A Year In the Saddle

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X