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Kitty tolerance wearing thin....

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  • #21
    well, you mutilated him, now you have to live with the results.
    Unfortunately, having been surgically mutilated is one of the major reasons why cats don't use litterboxes- the litter hurts their mutilated paws.
    So perhaps you should proceed with your toilet-training plan, but wait for the cat to heal fully- this may take many weeks- and then start over at step 1.
    Or you could do a trial-n-error to see what kinds of litter your cat will accept- go buy a dozen litterboxes and a dozen different types of litter, and put them out and see which ones he likes. Some cats who have been mutilated only like soft shredded newspapers, or need to be given a puppy potty-pad type situation.
    He might also need medications- pain killers for his mutilated paws, and prozac for his nerves.
    Many cats turn into neurotic messes after such surgery- they are now defenseless and they know it. Makes em scared and stressed. Stressed and scared kitties pee all over.
    Plus they are in severe pain. Possibly forever. Here's a PDF about "pain management after amputation". It's for people, but will give you some idea of what your cat, now a multiple-amputee victim, is going through:

    http://www.amputee-coalition.org/fac.../painmgmt.html

    here's another one, note it says that full healing may take as long as 6 months, and that many victims of major hand injuries suffer from post traumatic stress disorder after the incident- and they are talking about people who only have one finger amputated, not all of them like your poor cat:

    http://ericksonhandsurgery.com/patie...ger_amputation
    Last edited by wendy; Dec. 31, 2012, 02:21 PM.

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    • #22
      Originally posted by wendy View Post
      well, you mutilated him, now you have to live with the results.
      Unfortunately, having been surgically mutilated is one of the major reasons why cats don't use litterboxes- the litter hurts their mutilated paws.
      So perhaps you should proceed with your toilet-training plan, but wait for the cat to heal fully- this may take many weeks- and then start over at step 1.
      Or you could do a trial-n-error to see what kinds of litter your cat will accept- go buy a dozen litterboxes and a dozen different types of litter, and put them out and see which ones he likes. Some cats who have been mutilated only like soft shredded newspapers, or need to be given a puppy potty-pad type situation.
      He might also need medications- pain killers for his mutilated paws, and prozac for his nerves.
      Many cats turn into neurotic messes after such surgery- they are now defenseless and they know it. Makes em scared and stressed. Stressed and scared kitties pee all over.
      Plus they are in severe pain. Possibly forever. Here's a PDF about "pain management after amputation". It's for people, but will give you some idea of what your cat, now a multiple-amputee victim, is going through:

      http://www.amputee-coalition.org/fac.../painmgmt.html

      here's another one, note it says that full healing may take as long as 6 months, and that many victims of major hand injuries suffer from post traumatic stress disorder after the incident- and they are talking about people who only have one finger amputated, not all of them like your poor cat:

      http://ericksonhandsurgery.com/patie...ger_amputation
      Hear! Hear! Why do people who aren't cat people bother to get cats at all?
      Founder of the People Who Prefer COTH Over FB Clique
      People Who Hate to Rush to Kill Wildlife Clique!
      "I Sing Silly Songs to My Animals!" Clique

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      • #23
        Aaaannd we've taken the chicken way out and deleted the 1st post.

        Hey, you asked for opinions, you got 'em.


        My cat that is prone to crystals in his urine is a happy seeming guy. He plays, he cuddles, he eats well, he sleeps curled up and purring. But he pees on things when he has a flare up.

        My previous cat that was a stress pee-er was a happy guy; played, purred, cuddled, the works. But he was indeed stressed by another cat who ambushed him from time to time, and harassed him when I wasn't home. (Got that sorted out w/ meds, separation, & re-introduction).

        The point being here that a cat can LOOK happy and unconcerned but still have issues, physical or mental or both. That's what cats do until things are really advanced - their signals are subtle and they hide their weaknesses. It's part of why they go feral so very easily, showing weakness in the wild world gets you dead pretty quickly.

        Just because he's happy and playing most of the time doesn't mean that there isn't something going on. Cats don't just pee randomly to be assholes, they do it to get attention for one reason or another. YOUR job is not to punish him but to find out why.

        In the meantime, close doors and keep everything off the floor.

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        • #24
          And once in a while you get a cat who is physically fine like my Ginger but still urinates on this. (And she's been vetted, several times). Unfortunately Ginger has mental issues - she was starved as a wee kitten and nearly died when we first got her. She was weak enough she had to be force fed. It appears to have caused some mental damage. She's sweet, she purrs, she sits on you... but she has a thing for rugs. She loves to pee on them.

          It drives me crazy as I would LIKE to have throw rugs on the floor, but we just accommodate her. I took her on 'for better or for worse' and as long as she's not in physical pain, I'm not going to euthanize her or toss her out to get eaten by the coyotes. We don't have throw rugs in any room but the bathrooms, and we keep those doors shut.

          Different people have different views on pets, I guess. For me, when I take one on, it is a commitment to keep that pet as healthy, safe, and comfortable as I can. And if she/he has special needs, then I deal with them. And I do love this kitty girl.
          Visit us at Bluebonnet Equine Humane Society - www.bluebonnetequine.org

          Want to get involved in rescue or start your own? Check out How to Start a Horse Rescue - www.howtostartarescue.com

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          • #25
            A friend's dog is like that. She's outwardly just fine, but there's something NQR with her due to severe malnutrition and probably being chucked out of a car when she was a wee thing. She about 98% housebroken, but she has a thing for bathmats and the bathroom, to the point that if the door is closed she will get a bit OCD about getting in there. She likes to pee in there, prefers the mat but will go on bare floor. Closing her out just winds her up and ruins the door. So my friend bought a stack of cheapie rubber backed mats, and just tosses them in the wash as needed. Dog's happy, house doesn't reek, there's a bit more laundry but it's maybe every other day or so, so not ridiculous.

            You do what ya gotta do to keep them happy.

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            • #26
              Originally posted by runNjump86 View Post
              I don't feel like arguing, justifying, or responding to any of these messages.

              Wish I could post a pic of the "scarred, stressed, traumatized" kitty who needs a new home, as he's playing with his toys and running around the house purring. Yep. He's traumatized all right.

              sadly this post just further confirms your complete lack of understanding of the cat psyche

              "Inappropriate urination" is stress related, be it physical (eg, crystals which are very common in dry-food-fed neutered male cats) or mental (e.g., the dogs in this instance: many cats prefer to "live alone" or with dogs that are submissive (to the cat), or other factors in the house, such as humans that are inconsistent in their habits, etc).

              I do hope you find an experienced Cat Vet in your area.

              There are many cats in the world that would not even consider urinating/marking in the house - you DO NOT have 1 of them; I hope that in time, you come back to this topic with a more open belief system.

              While some posters were rather harsh, the reality is that your kitty is unwell in some manner.

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              • #27
                Wow. You have 100% agreement that YOU ARE DOING WRONG by your cat. You've been on COTH long enough to realize how unusual that is. And you're choosing to ignore all the people who are giving you REALLY good advice? I realize it can be tough to own up and admit that you've really effed up here, but it's time to be a grown up.

                I'm very sad for your poor cat. The fact he was peeing not in the litterbox before you even had him declawed was a red flag on it's own. That he's continuing to pee in weird places simply SCREAMS a urinary problem. Do you realize that cats, especially male cats, can actually die if they have urinary crystals that are untreated?

                And, BTW, cats often purr when they are IN PAIN.

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                • #28
                  why isn't declawing cats illegal in this country? it's illegal in most of the world because everyone realizes it's extreme animal abuse. Some people argue that it "saves lives" because some people would get rid of their cat if they can't stop the cat from clawing the furniture, but the biggest reason why cats lose their homes is not using the litterbox- and being declawed is very likely to lead to not using the litterbox.
                  I really can't believe there are still vets out there who will do "routine" neuter/declaws on kittens like the poor OP's kitten. They can't even justify such mutilation by saying well, we tried everything to stop him from clawing up the furniture first. No, they just chopped him up for no good reason.

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                  • #29
                    I don't really understand what is so hard about cats.

                    I have two cats that I rescued at the same time from a PetCo.
                    I had never owned cats before, but I figured purchasing two litter boxes and a scratching cardboard thing would be a good start. The basement is their own space as the dogs are not allowed down there, but they are welcome to come upstairs when they choose to (which they would probably choose to do more if it were not for the dogs, but such is the situation as it has been brokered by all the animals involved). The sum total effort required to care for them is scooping food into their dish once per day and cleaning the litter box. I should trim their nails more than I do but occasionally they get a clip.

                    And a year later they have never once peed outside the box and never once scratched a piece of furniture.

                    This is hard why?
                    The Noodlehttp://tiny.cc/NGKmT&http://tiny.cc/gioSA
                    Jinxyhttp://tiny.cc/PIC798&http://tiny.cc/jinx364
                    Boy Wonderhttp://tiny.cc/G9290
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                    • #30
                      One of our cats was declawed previous to us getting him. Sadly though I did know his previous owner we did not know at the time it happened he would be coming to us so there was no way to stop it. He had issues with the litterbox & peeing on the carpet during the month we moved and didn't let him out (he has been an outdoor cat his whole life, is now nearly 15), but will quite happily go outside. My Dad did a lot of research on declawing and found a lot of people had similar issues with declawed cats.

                      I would never ever EVER declaw a cat (says the girl covered in scratches on one hand from other kitty "playing") and am also shocked that vets are still doing the procedure. However, what is done is done. If I were you I'd maybe change him to being an indoor/outdoor cat (with cat door) after he has properly healed.

                      I think it is fine to let declawed cats outside as long as they have the CHOICE. When ours was younger he spent most of his time outside. Now he's older he'd rather curl up in a chair, but does go outside to use the bathroom and when we're outside. Interestingly carpet peeing stopped as soon as they were let outside again after we moved.
                      "Choose to chance the rapids, and dare to dance the tides" - Garth Brooks
                      "With your permission, dear, I'll take my fences one at a time" - Maggie Smith, Downton Abbey

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                      • #31
                        Originally posted by Wellspotted View Post
                        Hear! Hear! Why do people who aren't cat people bother to get cats at all?
                        This. This is at least the second "angry at the cat" post on this BB in a couple of weeks. Someone else was threatening to boot the cat outside or slap it on Craigslist.

                        FWIW, my cats are both declawed. I didn't do it because I don't approve of declawing - I didn't even know the first cat was even declawed til I got him home and I was reading the paper in my adoption packet that was filled out by his crappy former owner when she dumped him at the shelter at 9 years old (reason: boyfriend allergic ).

                        I fully believe that it's not pleasant for a cat to live with declawing after having my boys. Sure, they play, they eat like little piggies, they are sweet as can be (thankfully, neither of mine developed aggression issues). But both are awkward when they jump down from somewhere...my second cat stumbles a bit when he lands. I fully believe their balance is off from the declawing. And neither cat covers their business in the litter box, which is pretty common with declawed cats.

                        Heck my first cat, who also has colitis, doesn't even use the litter box to defacate sometimes. Sometimes it's super annoying when he has an accident (imagine scrubbing diarrhea off a carpet...welcome to my cat ownership world) and I get mad - but only to myself. I know he can't help it so I walk away for a few minutes to cool off, then come back and clean it up.

                        Cats aren't perfect, either. I agree if your cat is peeing outside the box (which I'm gathering from the other posts, since you took the chicken way out and deleted the OP), there is definitely something wrong with him. I don't believe yours is peeing outside the box to be a jerk anymore than my cat is defacating outside the box to be a jerk. They aren't that advanced.
                        *Wendy* 4.17.73 - 12.20.05

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