• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse
1 of 2 < >

Event Announcements now available FREE to all registered users

We just reconfigured the Event Announcements forum to be available as a free service for all registered forum users. See the thread stuck at the top of that forum for more information.
2 of 2 < >

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Thinking about a GSD, have some ?'s

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Thinking about a GSD, have some ?'s

    We've been mulling over getting another dog lately and through a friend have come across a gorgeous 11 month old black GSD that is in need of a new family. We currently have my older lab but both of us have owned and been around dogs all of our lives. I always had labs, my SO most recently had a pitbull who passed away a few years ago. He has wanted another dog but just wasn't quite ready, he took the loss of his pittie very hard. He proposed this girl to me when he heard about her so it seems he is ready but neither of us have owned a GSD and I have a couple of breed specific questions. I know there are quite a few people that are experienced with dogs in this board so I thought I would pose a few questions in addition to doing other research!

    We're very early into deciding if this lovely girl will be a good fit for the family and we're asking all of the general "new dog" questions. I do know that GSDs are predisposed to hip issues, especially North American show bred dogs. I don't know anything about this dog's bloodlines at this time or what she was originally bred for - show, companion, or work. She is purebred and papered so I will have that information before we make a decision. Are there any other health issues that we should be aware of before we jump into GSD ownership?

    From what we've been told she was raised around and is good with young kids and cats, which is good because we have 3 cats and kids that visit regularly. She's never been around chickens or horses so I expect to need to do some training with that, but in general do GSD's have any natural behavior tendencies when it comes to small animals and livestock?

    Finally, what sort of training do they generally need? In all honesty this would be my area of least experience. I have always had labs who were super easy to train. I instilled the basic sit, stay, heel plus some little tricks in my current dog without a single obedience class. I never had to teach her how to behave around the chickens and horses - she's just always been a sweetheart about everything. My SO is more experienced in this area - he did a very good job training the above mentioned pittie. I don't yet know what kind of training this little girl has had and if she has any major behavioral problems we will likely pass so for the purpose of this question let's assume she is a blank slate. I know trainability will also depend on breeding and temperament but in general how challenging are GSDs to train? I'm assuming obedience classes would be a good idea?

    If you think of anything else not covered above please feel free to share, all input is greatly appreciated. We want to go into this as educated and with eyes as wide open as possible as our home is always a permanent one for cats and dogs.

  • #2
    Good luck to you! I have 3 GSD.

    Caveat through all of the following is I'm talking generally. If your GSD has had previous trauma or temperament issues that are causing her to be rehomed, that's entirely different.

    Generally speaking, the breed is very intelligent. Extremely trainable, learn quickly, no worries there.

    You could always have hip x-rays done as a pre-condition of taking her, however, I can't stress enough to find a vet that knows how to do them, and isn't a GSD-hater and will assume that they all have crappy hips. Sometimes even iffy hips on x-rays...well, you'd never know it by how active the dog is; it doesn't affect them.

    Some GSD do have intense prey drive when it comes to little quick moving things. I have one that I don't let have the run of the house if I'm at work lest playtime with one particular cat gets out of hand (cat is a Philly street-thug stray who longs to die in battle and thoroughly enjoys face-hugging the GSD and then running for his life. Things might get out of hand if I wasn't there). The other 2 are perfectly fine with the cats.

    If your SO has trained the pit, I don't see a problem. GSD love having a job. I'm sure there are couch potato GSD out there but I sure hope you're an active family who will make her part of a non-sedentary lifestyle. They do best like that. They look at dog-human as an equal partnership, IME. Think about that for a moment. They're bright. They know they're bright. They want to use their minds as well as their bodies.

    You may have to teach her how to behave around the chickens & horses. Some take to it naturally, others have to be taught NOT FOR EATING.

    Generally speaking, they are very bright dogs who are extremely devoted and do well in rehoming, in that once they learn to love & trust you, they will be devoted to you plus just be a lot of love & fun. As intimidating & protective as some can be, that same dog can be, as my daughter says of my 90 lb. Schutzhund dog, "the biggest goofball I've ever met."

    Comment


    • #3
      Good info above.

      I'd add that it will be important to know how your dog is bred to give you a better idea of the expected behavior and temperament. The working bred dogs tend to have more prey drive and require a job and a good deal of training. They are not really meant to be pets. The show bred ones often have much softer temperaments but are less healthy.

      And GSDs are herding dogs, so you WILL have to spend some time teaching her not to chase the horses. If the dog is of working lines, this can be a real challenge and might actually have to be accomplished by someone who knows how to properly use an electric collar.

      In addition to hip issues, many GSDs have skin allergy problems and eye allergy problems.

      Overall, if you get one that has not been too badly bred (read: if it's not one of those sloped backed mutants currently so prevalent in the show ring) you should have a nice, loving, loyal dog that will be a joy to be around after you've done some basic training.
      Visit Sonesta Farms website at www.sonestafarms.com or our FaceBook page at www.facebook.com/sonestafarms. Also showing & breeding Cavalier King Charles Spaniels.

      Comment

      • Original Poster

        #4
        Thank you guys for your input, it's so helpful.

        I am supposed to get some more information tonight and will see what I can find out about her background and bloodlines. We definitely don't mind a more active dog - we are very active and have a small farm back on a quiet street surrounded by other small farms so there is plenty of room to exercise and miles and miles of trails for her to ride with my older horse and I (if she comes home with us and once she's trained to safely behave around horses). She wouldn't be a working dog per say but we're very active and she'd get a ton of exercise. We are lucky because our work schedule is kind of staggered. My SO goes to work very early and is home by early afternoon. I don't go into the office until mid-morning plus I work from home sometimes so she'd get lots of attention and wouldn't be left alone for too long at a time.

        I will keep your feedback in mind as we investigate. I'll keep you guys updated as I get more info and let you know what we decide

        Comment


        • #5
          Do you know why she's being rehomed? And of course individuals often vary from what they're "supposed to be." My 3 are a German working line, a German Show Line, and my pound puppy is what I affectionately call "American Pet Line." All 3 are attractive to look at, all 3 are very bright, very happy, very trainable and easy. However, in my case the German working line dog is definitely softer than the show line dog. ("Soft" is a bad word to a lot of GSD people). When the show line dog got his IPO 1 last Spring (that's the first level Schutzhund title), he was high scoring dog in all 3 phases (Tracking, Obedience, Protection), high scoring IPO 1 and high in trial as well. He was the only Show Line dog in the trial. All the others were sable working line dogs and he smoked every one of them. So beware of judging her only by her pedigree.

          That being said, I agree with what Sonesta wrote. As she wrote, working dogs *tend* to etc. etc.

          Comment

          • Original Poster

            #6
            Anne - She was originally purchased from a breeder although I don't yet know who the breeder was - that's one of the things I'm going to find out. I'd like to see if anyone knows the breeder and has thoughts. Now she is needing to be re-homed by the family who originally purchased her (they are friends of a friend) because they're living situation has changed and apparently they are not allowed to have dogs where they are now at. Trying not to judge on that one as I don't know the circumstances of the move... Just that moving somewhere that didn't accept my animals is not something I would ever consider unless absolutely desperate. The chickens come and go and I've sold a horse or two over the years but the rest of our animals are lifelong keepers Like I said, not going to judge without details though - situations come up that are out of our control. We haven't met her yet so I can't say what her current owners are like or what her personality is like but just from the pictures I have of her she appears alert and happy, groomed, well taken care of, and in a well kept home at least.

            Comment


            • #7
              RedmondDressage,

              If the original breeders were good breeders, they would have taken the product of their program back and found the pup a suitable home themselves. Ah well, it is what it is, no doubt. My first GSD was the product of a BYB that I would never ever ever support these days, yet he turned out to be my perfect, wonderful, forever dog, and all subsequent dogs will (and have) paled in comparison. Unfortunately his heart and mind far exceeded his the limitations of his body, and that was a heartbreaker. Good luck to you and the pup!

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by libgrrl View Post
                RedmondDressage,

                If the original breeders were good breeders, they would have taken the product of their program back and found the pup a suitable home themselves. Ah well, it is what it is, no doubt. My first GSD was the product of a BYB that I would never ever ever support these days, yet he turned out to be my perfect, wonderful, forever dog, and all subsequent dogs will (and have) paled in comparison. Unfortunately his heart and mind far exceeded his the limitations of his body, and that was a heartbreaker. Good luck to you and the pup!
                We had one of these rare treasures too. But those are not common.
                Visit Sonesta Farms website at www.sonestafarms.com or our FaceBook page at www.facebook.com/sonestafarms. Also showing & breeding Cavalier King Charles Spaniels.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I am by no means a GSD expert, but I do think that getting along with chickens, cats, and horses is related to prey drive. With a really high prey drive dog, you can probably teach the dog a "leave it" command for when you are right there, but they will always have the prey drive in their brain and probably shouldn't be trusted alone with prey animals (at least that is my opinion and how I manage my high prey drive dog).
                  For those more experienced in GSDs like Anne, one thing that I have observed is that some GSDs can be very vocal - I don't know if that is just the ones I've known or a breed trait. It doesn't sound like the OP lives in an apartment situation, but it's something to keep in mind.
                  I think it is nice that the dog isn't a young puppy because when you meet the dog, hopefully you'll be able to assess what she's like and decide if she'll be a fit for you.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    They are like any other breed, you will have some great ones and some lemons.

                    Temperment wise, I like them because they are generally very trainable and loyal, similar to the lab, however I find GSD's generally smarter. They need to work, or have some type of job.

                    I meet a lot of GSD's and prepurchase them for many police foundations. Many of them have mediocre hips, some have extremely poor and there are a handful (mostly european) that are good. Meidocre hips can be managed. I suggest before you commit to her, have a hip radiograph taken so you know what you are getting into.

                    Love the breed, hate the hair, but I will always have a soft spot for a good GSD.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      AnneFS: "... cat is a Philly street-thug stray who longs to die in battle...."

                      Favorite description ever!!! I'm picturing a torn-eared crooked-tailed chubby-cheeked Russell Crowe type with a Popeye eyepatch...

                      Comment

                      • Original Poster

                        #12
                        Originally posted by libgrrl View Post
                        RedmondDressage,

                        If the original breeders were good breeders, they would have taken the product of their program back and found the pup a suitable home themselves. Ah well, it is what it is, no doubt. My first GSD was the product of a BYB that I would never ever ever support these days, yet he turned out to be my perfect, wonderful, forever dog, and all subsequent dogs will (and have) paled in comparison. Unfortunately his heart and mind far exceeded his the limitations of his body, and that was a heartbreaker. Good luck to you and the pup!
                        Thanks Anne! I agree, the original breeder should take her back but I actually don't know if they even contacted him/her. I wonder how many people think to do that? I would, but I've been in horses long enough to know that when someone is in distress the breeder should always be the first call... Not sure if regular folks know to do that. If we don't go through with it I may just mention that to them in case they didn't think of it. Either way I will let you guys know what I find out and what we end up deciding... And of course if we do end up going through with it I will post pics

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I LOVE my GSD. Never had one before, wasn't particularly attracted to the breed as a whole before. We got ours because we wanted a big,black dog as a visual deterrent. He is the absolute smartest dog I've ever been around. I put a huge amount of time into him. When he was little, I was constantly directing him, talking to him, touching him, taking him everywhere. Now, at almost 2 years old- he can be directed what to do, where to go, to leave things, to drop things all with hand signals. We have horses,cats and chickens- he's no more interested in them than I allow him to be..has NEVER offered to chase or bark at the horses. I think if you get her, my biggest suggestion would be to start to put a great base on her-a solid sit, stay and recall- once you have those- you can control pretty much any reaction she might have to anything. Be prepared for a dog who's eyes never, ever leave you.....
                          Kerri

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by kasjordan View Post
                            Be prepared for a dog who's eyes never, ever leave you.....
                            I agree. We had one when I was a kid, and I have a shep/boxer mix now. Both dogs were incredibly loyal, and always 'shadowing" me. The one I have now is very sensitive to even a slightly raised voice. When she passes on, I will definitely look for a GSD or part GSD.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              If you're used to goofy, rowdy laid-back labs and pitties you will find a GSD to be a very different sort of dog- have you interacted with any to see what they are like? you may not like them if labs and pitties are the kind of dog that you prefer. In my experience most people who are fond of the "lab" type of dog don't really go for the GSD temperament and vice-versus.

                              From your comments about the breeder, I'm guessing this is an american pet line. They are, unfortunately, often neurotic, fearful, and/or aggressive, and devoid of useful drives. Hopefully you can meet the individual and see for yourself what this particular dog is like. Sadly many of the "pet" GSD we see have horrible temperaments. Statistics indicate they are very high up on the lists of "dogs that bite people", and are also way up on the lists of "dogs that attack other dogs". Because of this, check your local insurance/legal regulations- many insurance companies won't insure your home if you own one, many rental places won't rent to you, and some places have outright bans.

                              as to health, well, unfortunately the modern GSD is a genetic disaster. People always think of hips, but hips are the least of your worries. Hip dysplasia affects about 20% of the breed in general, but hip dysplasia is a very manageable, treatable disease. It's the OTHER diseases you should be frightened of. Elbow dysplasia and degenerative myleopathy are crippling and tend to not be treatable, and each affect about 20% of the breed overall, much higher in poorly-bred "pet" lines. Many GSDs have digestive problems, everything from pancreatic insufficiency to chronic diarrhea to bloating. Other fun problems- spinal stenosis, allergies, skin problems, the list goes on. Many working groups have dropped the breed due to the difficulty of finding healthy ones.

                              I have to admit this is one breed I'd be quite reluctant to accept as a "rescue" dog- the odds of "lucking into" a healthy individual with a good temperament in the rescue system is quite low. However, if you know the breeder, you can actually investigate and see if the dog is likely to be carrying multiple diseases or not, and see what the temperament may be like.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Even the working lines can have hip issues.

                                Basically what has been said.

                                I really like a good working GSD. I have zero interest in most American show or pet bred ones. I have seen way too many fearful dogs. I help with training classes, so I've seen quite a few, btw. And the fear gets worse with age. I'm not trying to talk you out of the dog, but evaluate it carefully.

                                Also, be really honest with yourself about your lifestyle and your family's committment to training the dog. My friend has one and I think it sometimes drives her husband insane. Unfortunately, he is the person who works from home. Everyone should be on board, is my point, and learn how to handle the dog. GSDs are a very active, higher energy dog. Needs a job, training, and exercise. Also, they will tend to "herd" things, like horses by the ankles, so be ready to work on that. I have another friend who's horse is a unconfirmed (giver her some time and she'll get one eventually) dog-killer thanks to an older GSD pup that a BO had that thought herding the horses was a blast. Luckily my horse, who was a yearling and also bit by the dog, seems not to hold any grudges.

                                GSDs are easy to train, but will get bored--intelligent dogs. Like most dogs the ones I've known chill out a bit with age. I agree with your idea of doing obedience classes.
                                Last edited by TrotTrotPumpkn; Dec. 6, 2012, 06:22 PM.
                                DIY Journey of Remodeling the Farmette: http://weownblackacre.blogspot.com/

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  http://www.dogbreedhealth.com/german...-dog-alsatian/

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by wendy View Post
                                    check your local insurance/legal regulations- many insurance companies won't insure your home if you own one, many rental places won't rent to you, and some places have outright bans.

                                    as to health, well, unfortunately the modern GSD is a genetic disaster. People always think of hips, but hips are the least of your worries. Hip dysplasia affects about 20% of the breed in general, but hip dysplasia is a very manageable, treatable disease. It's the OTHER diseases you should be frightened of. Elbow dysplasia and degenerative myleopathy are crippling and tend to not be treatable, and each affect about 20% of the breed overall, much higher in poorly-bred "pet" lines. Many GSDs have digestive problems, everything from pancreatic insufficiency to chronic diarrhea to bloating. Other fun problems- spinal stenosis, allergies, skin problems, the list goes on. Many working groups have dropped the breed due to the difficulty of finding healthy ones.

                                    I have to admit this is one breed I'd be quite reluctant to accept as a "rescue" dog- the odds of "lucking into" a healthy individual with a good temperament in the rescue system is quite low. However, if you know the breeder, you can actually investigate and see if the dog is likely to be carrying multiple diseases or not, and see what the temperament may be like.
                                    THIS. You'll want to call your farm insurance agent as well, because the presence on your property of the "wrong' dog - or, in some cases, ANY dog - can invalidate not just your homeowner's insurance coverage but your farm insurance coverage. The "dog clauses" in farm insurance policies seem to change every year or so, with the trend being toward more and tighter restrictions. It's best to find out what's what BEFORE you fall in love with a dog and bring it home. Saying "No" to a prospective dog is a lot easier, logistically and psychologically, than trying to re-home YOUR dog, even if it's been yours for only a week. Good luck!
                                    Home page: www.jessicajahiel.com
                                    Horse-Sense newsletter: www.horse-sense.org

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Until about 5 yrs ago.....the only breed of dog I ever owned as and adult were GSDs (we had lots of mixes when we were kids though) I have had at least 8 of them over the years. Ive had some really nice german lined dogs, a couple american and a couple were 'unknown' not even registered but obviously purebred.....both dogs and bitches....some spayed/neutered and some intact and bred one litter back before I had kids and had the time to devote to them. I was always very careful about temperaments and stayed away from spooky shy types. Those are the fear biters.

                                      The thing I can say about all of them is they were very smart and highly trainable and have very good 'common sense'. They just seemed to know right from wrong as far as basic behavior. They didnt chew up household items, get into the garbage, steal food off the counters etc.....and if the did... it only took one good scolding with my voice and that was the end of it. They are very brave and will bond very closely with their family and usually will have one person who they just live to please......they are also very sensitive and act like big babies with their people. Mine we very obedient and most could be trusted off lead in many situations. They would stop on a dime and come when called.

                                      Ok, so in the past 5 yrs I have had 2 Airedales and one pit-bull mix. BIG BIG differences! One, that may not matter at all to but something you should know about.....is that they shed BIG time 24/7/365. They are one of the highest shedding dog breeds out there. My Airedales do not shed at all and the pit bull does but NOTHING in comparison to the GSDs. They are double coated so have a fuzzy undercoat as well as their top-coat. There will be hair everywhere.

                                      The next big difference I found that my GSDs were not the kind of dogs who get all wiggly and waggy when they saw another dog, as my current dogs do. They generally did NOT like other dogs much. Some were OK with dogs they got to know from seeing them frequently but on the whole they were not dogs to could just take to a dog park for instance.....and just let them 'play' or you'd be asking for a dog fight.

                                      So as someone mentioned before.....that is one of the differences between Labs and GSDs and why people ususally go for one type of dog over the other. If you want a happy go lucky all I want to do is play play play type dog, the Lab is a better choice. I found my GSDs to be more on the serious side and they want a job...they love to 'work'. Not they are not playful and love to play ball, fetch a stick, go swimming...they will do all of that and more.

                                      Also, my Airedales and my pitty have absolutely no interest in chasing the horses....they like to sniff noses and be their friends. ALL of my Shepherds barked at and chased the horses to some degree. Most we were able to control but it took training and always keeping them in check. We had one that lived to chase them and we had to correct him on a daily basis.....other than that, he was perfect!

                                      They are wonderful dogs.....it was the hair.....and grandchildrens allergies that prompted me to find a new breed to live with. If they didnt shed......I'd have at least two

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by LuvMyperch View Post
                                        Also, my Airedales and my pitty have absolutely no interest in chasing the horses....they like to sniff noses and be their friends. ALL of my Shepherds barked at and chased the horses to some degree. Most we were able to control but it took training and always keeping them in check. We had one that lived to chase them and we had to correct him on a daily basis.....other than that, he was perfect!
                                        I have a picture of my Airedale trying to pull my TB by his tail. Fortunately Irish is tolerant.

                                        StG

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X