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I do not need another dog...

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  • I do not need another dog...

    I do not need another dog. I do not need another dog.

    But he's just so cute. DH was never allowed to have pets growing up, but always dreamed of owning a Lab.

    We've already been approved. I have the time and experience to take on a puppy. Christmas is coming. Our Dixie is wonderful with other dogs. We have the space. Our new house is even bigger.

    We have a 9 month old. We're moving in March.

    Enable? Un-enable? I'm torn!

  • #2
    Originally posted by Superminion View Post
    I do not need another dog. I do not need another dog.

    But he's just so cute. DH was never allowed to have pets growing up, but always dreamed of owning a Lab.

    We've already been approved. I have the time and experience to take on a puppy. Christmas is coming. Our Dixie is wonderful with other dogs. We have the space. Our new house is even bigger.

    We have a 9 month old. We're moving in March.

    Enable? Un-enable? I'm torn!
    If that is a nine month old human baby, I vote unenable. Jumps on people and nips plus a baby sounds disasterous.

    Then again I am not a big fan of labs so you may want to ignore this.
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.

    Comment

    • Original Poster

      #3
      Originally posted by EqTrainer View Post
      If that is a nine month old human baby, I vote unenable. Jumps on people and nips plus a baby sounds disasterous.

      Then again I am not a big fan of labs so you may want to ignore this.
      Human baby. That's my biggest hold up.

      Do you mind sharing why you aren't a big fan of them? I've never owned a lab (Goldens, JRT, Cattle Dogs, and various hounds, though, all with success but one). I feel pretty confident in my puppy rearing skills.

      Comment


      • #4
        The jumping and nipping can be trained out of him easy enough with dedication and consistancy but labs need a ton of exercise. Not all but most can become very destructive and loud if they aren't getting enough attention/exercise. I am an enabler but that's because I've done it before myself too!
        The one good thing about repeating your mistakes is that you know when to cringe.

        Comment


        • #5
          i have had labs and labx for the past thirty years.........usually two or three at a time.........
          temperment-wise, i couldn't have asked for nicer, more even tempered dogs............some of them could have been brighter, or a tad less enthusiastic, but they were all great dogs........
          they do take a while to mentally mature, and they can really CHEW...............but if you want a dog always ready for a romp or to please you, labs fit the bill........

          i raised two human babies who were always surrounded by labs, and my last one,helped my grandson learn to walk,despite his own arthritic hip issues.........

          my only "fault" with them is that they seem to fall apart slowly, starting at age 7 or 8...........and it is heartbreaking and hard.....but, i stll kept getting them for 30 yrs, so the great outwghs the bad..........

          Comment


          • #6
            While I'm usually an enabler extraordinaire, I also am leery of a 9-month child & a 10-week-old Rottweiler/Lab cross that jumps up on folks & "nips". If it were just you & your husband, I'd be enabling all over the place. But this combination doesn't sit well with me for some reason. But that's just my opinion.

            You asked for "enable" or "un-enable", so regardless of your puppy-rearing skills, please don't take offense if some folks may not go their usual "enable" route in this situation.

            If I were in your spot, I'd wait until after your move, & when your child is somewhat older & more educated re: the proper way to treat pets. I'm sure there will be more than enough adorable Lab puppies up for adoption when your housing situation is stable & your child is older.

            Comment


            • #7
              And guys - if you haven't read the dog's ad/description, it's a Rottweiler/Lab cross - not just a Lab. There can be a big difference in temperament/required training there. And no, while not a fan, I'm not a Rottweiler basher either. Just wanted to point out that we're not talking about a pure Lab here.

              Comment


              • #8
                I am a pretty good puppy raiser too. But when my kids were that age, I would have not have wished to deal with a dog who was already jumping and nipping. So much easier to avoid these things, and one jump onto a child who is just pulling themselves up or beginning to walk could be very bad. The nipping part, I doubt I need to elaborate on. I think you would have to keep them very separated and IMO there is no bigger PITA than dealing with that. I keep my puppies with me nearly all the time so I dont even know how I could have done that, with a baby soon to be toddler.

                FWIW,I prevent jumping up by never ever paying a puppy any attention until they sit. They learn to sit for attention, for treats, for their dinner, for a bone... For anything at all. It requires diligence for a while and then it is there, hardwired.

                Labs. I know, I know, everyone adores them and dog knows I have known some that I love, too. But it seems like oh so many of them come with the supersized exuberance button turned on at all times, combined with a certain thickness of skin/lack of sensitivity that makes them difficult to train as companion dogs. I want a companion dog now, not in three years when he mellows out a bit LOL by 6-8 months if i have put in the time I expect to have what I want. My friends who are into labs seem to be on some sort of 2-3 year plan! I gravitate towards herding breeds ( border collies, shelties) that were bred to work with humans and take direction. It seems to make want I want the end result to be, much easier.

                So it is really a personal thing. All kinds of dogs come in all kinds of breeds but they are all bred for a purpose and their purpose breeding doesnt work for me. I actually did have a rottie/lab mix rescue pup once. He was VERY SMART and tweaky. He growled at LMEqT more than once, while she was walking across the room. No contact. He was with me for basic training (house training, recall, sit, stay, walk on lead) and then to be rehomed. He went to a COTHer who wanted a big dog that could be counted on to be protective if necessary. He was perfect!
                "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
                ---
                The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I'm an enabler, but you need an older dog, quieter dog. Save an older lab...they're harder to adopt than cute puppies and are so grateful.

                  Now if you want a collie, I can help with that.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by LauraKY View Post
                    I'm an enabler, but you need an older dog, quieter dog. Save an older lab...they're harder to adopt than cute puppies and are so grateful.

                    Now if you want a collie, I can help with that.
                    collies make great family dogs!
                    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
                    ---
                    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.

                    Comment

                    • Original Poster

                      #11
                      You all have some really good points! Thank you.

                      I appreciate the reality checks, I really do! I think that we are going to pass on him, I'm sure he'll be snapped up quickly! We got Dixie as a hyper active puppy, and did (what I like to think as) a pretty good job with her thus-far. She's JRTxCorgixGodonlyknows and was a handful of all handfuls, but only 25lbs. I didn't put as much thought into jumping and nipping as I probably should have.

                      We have our open sign hung out, maybe something a little older and even tempered (or smaller, at least) will find us!

                      Comment

                      • Original Poster

                        #12
                        Originally posted by LauraKY View Post
                        I'm an enabler, but you need an older dog, quieter dog. Save an older lab...they're harder to adopt than cute puppies and are so grateful.

                        Now if you want a collie, I can help with that.
                        I have never had any real interactions with a collie! I've heard they can be snappish?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I wouldn't. This guy is going to be a puppy for a while. Your DD is going to be starting to learn to walk while this pup is going through his puppy antics. While the jumping/nipping thing can be worked on, you just can't take the puppy out of a puppy. The timing is just wrong. Go with a nice, calm adult dog. I'm fostering the NICEST great dane right now. OMG - I love her. She's so quiet, you hardly know she's in the house. She walks perfectly on the leash. She knows basic commands of sit and down. She hasn't had one accident in the house. She really is the closest thing to the perfect dog I've met in a long time. How she came into rescue you ask? Her family was in the process of moving, dropped her off at a boarding kennel and never came back to pick her up. I don't understand how they could just abandon her like that. She was then adopted out to a family and picked up by the dog warden a few months later. She was SKINNY and very timid around men. Prior to this home she was a social, confident dog who loved everyone. The microchip was still registered to the rescue so we got the call that she was picked up. We contacted her adopters who said she was missing about 2 days or so. They never called the rescue to give us the heads up she was out and about and based on her condition, we opted not to return her to that family. They were clearly in violation of their contract due to her condition. She needs a good 30 pounds and some confidence back but I'm totally smitten with this dog. I'm just her foster but I can honestly say I've never been this in love with any other foster dog.

                          Diamonds in the rough are out there in rescue land. Sometimes you just have to look through the cute to find them. I'm all about rescue but I'd pass on the baby and look for something that will transition into your family without much fuss. It would be a better fit for you and you will be giving an older (thus harder to place) dog a good home.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I don't really like labs either-in my long experience with them they have a TON of energy that can be difficult to channel into anything harmless, let alone good. Not super bright in a lot of cases, quite a few health problems unless you're very selective. My kids were young when my brother had a middle aged lab and I can't count how many time they were whacked with the tail, knocked over, bowled over, had their sandwich stolen from their hands, jumped on, jumped over. That dog was nearly the same age as my kids and lived to be 16 and he was only pleasant to be around the last five years of his life! And he was a very well bred dog that my brother spend years of training on-just a spaz. I don't see anything on ol' Cadbury's resume that makes me think he would be any different, sorry to say. You don't have enough time in your life to deal with that dog.

                            I got a puppy two months before my second kid was born and I don't even remember the puppy being around, she's always been such a good under-the-radar dog, she's a golden aussie cross of some sort born in the pound. I love having puppies and kids together but be selective. If you get an older dog, be 10 times as selective. And make sure you teach your kids how to behave around all dogs so the dog isn't in trouble when he snaps at the kid for giving him a Grandma sized hug around the dog's neck...

                            ETA hardly anybody NEEDS another dog but I think you have a wonderful home that some dog out there needs. Pick the right one for your family at this point. You're a very kind even-tempered person and I think you'll be fantastic for some sweet dog out there!
                            “Most people do not listen with the intent to understand; they listen with the intent to reply.” Stephen R. Covey

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Superminion View Post
                              I have never had any real interactions with a collie! I've heard they can be snappish?
                              My guy is a rough coated collie/black lab cross. We've had him since he was 7 weeks old or so and he has been an absolute doll. Whenever someone comes over with young children, he immediately goes into "babysitter mode" and watches them like a hawk. If a youngling tips over backwards in the ever-so-difficult fight against gravity, he jumps right behind them, props them up, and gives them a little snuggle so they don't worry. He is very well behaved in and out of the house, not aggressive at all towards other animals, and not aggressive to people UNLESS they are clearly unwelcome, in which case you bet he's going to growl a little and get between you and the unwelcome person.

                              I'm sure there are bad eggs, but I would not trade this dog for the world. A short hair version of him would be really nice, though... He sheds rather a lot.
                              Trying a life outside of FEI tents and hotel rooms.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Rottweiler/Lab cross is probably one of my least favorite mixes - they are apparantly a local favorite as ALOT of them come into the shelters as 6-9 mo olds (or 2 yr olds if someones had them on a chain) - they tend to be "hard" dogs so definitely not one I'd add to a family with a 9mo old baby (& moving in March).
                                (I like a PB rottie temperament over any of the crosses I've met.)

                                I love collies, they're usually "soft" dogs, I've only seen them snappish when in pain, some are friendly & outgoing with everyone they meet, others are much more family oriented.

                                I also vote for an older dog with a young child - find some rescues you like & get pre-approved, you can also attach a "preferred dog" list.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/24069323

                                  How about this one instead?

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    I love labs. Have a MAJOR weakness for them, especially when they have the handsome blocky heads. And show me a photo of a labrador leaping/swimming in water to retrieve a dead thing or buoy... I'm not a hunter but wow, love a dog doing what it was bred to do!
                                    Of course my labrador doesn't care much for the water... but the girl CAN swim like Phelps.

                                    Anyway, as much as I love them, i think I'll add to the majority opinion here too.
                                    You might be able to talk to a breeder about getting a slightly older pup or retired mama dog... could be an option.
                                    I had to laugh at that dog's bio. I don't think the puppy is necessarily bad (no worse than typical) but the bio was definitely written by someone who knows how popular a chocolate lab mix puppy will be and who didn't see the need to sugar coat or even 'talk up' the dog!

                                    The pictures also look like the dog is closer to 4 months old in my opinion, but I know looks can be deceiving.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      I have a lab mix and a lab (though she might be mix but she's all lab in terms of personality) and I love them. Yes the lab is energetic, but having said that, she can't keep up with my lab/sheltie/jack russell/who knows what else mix. Both are two and after a brief run around outside chasing the little dog (who runs circles around the lab, but LOVES to be chased), she's happy to nap on the sofa and snore. She loves people. LOVES people. She'd let anyone in the house if they gave her a hug. Doesn't bark at anyone. She's great. Little one is a hyper crazy thing who barks at anyone she hasn't met at least 3 times (then they are in her herd and are greeted instead with cries of happiness) and won't let strangers get close enough to pet her (she barks and backs up). 2 completely different dogs.

                                      The little one is scared of children, the lab LOVES children. That said, they are both excellent with children. The little one just runs away when uncomfortable. Neither snap, neither bite, both let you stick your hand down their throats any take anything from them. I trained the little one to let me do that from the start, but the lab (who I got in August as a 2yo rescue) is in heaven around kids. When my 20 month nephew visits, she lets him climb all over him, roll over him, hug him, etc. She follows him around and shares her toys with him.

                                      All of this said, my mom has a rottweiler (I think he's 4 or 5 now) and he is just as good with kids as the lab. He may not love them as much as she does (she melts when she sees a kid. She loves kids as much as she loves water), but he's just as tolerant. He lets my nephew hang all over him and even if he's had enough, he waits until nephew moves on then he gets up and finds a quiet place alone.

                                      All of that said, this is just my small experience with labs, rotties, and small children.

                                      Comment

                                      • Original Poster

                                        #20
                                        Thank you, everybody for your stories and opinions!

                                        Ruth- What a distinguished old man! He's lovely. I would be afraid of moving with a senior citizen, but he's worth a look-see! He may be perfect for my parents, who had to put down their golden and are looking for a new friend for their other dog.

                                        I don't have a problem dealing with energy. I'm a runner, and that's what 'cured' about 99% of Dixie's issues when we got her. A 3-5 mile jog on those little legs works a lot of the crazy out. We also enjoy agility, but Dixie has a little problem in that she's so focused on the hot dog bits in my hand, she plows into everything.

                                        I found this little guy, but DH is pretty firm on the whole, no more little dogs, thing. He's a party pooper!

                                        Does anybody have any experience with Greyhounds? We have a resuce here that is over flowing. We do have 2 cats, but they know how to dole out the smackdowns with no fear.

                                        Comment

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