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Oh, no-I found a Pit Bull-what now?

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  • #21
    My neighbor has a big, intact, male, Pit and he does just fine with the cats he lives with...he plays gently with them and snuggles with them . He does not chase my cat, even though my cat is the sworn enemy of one of the Pit's cats, he just ignores my kitty. He's great with other dogs as long as the other dog is not aggressive toward him. He plays very rough with my young, female, BC mix...she loves it and both know the difference between play fighting and real fighting, it has never crossed the line, even when there is lots of body slamming and pinning the other dog to the ground going on.

    I walk him quite a bit for his owner, who is not healthy enough to exercise him, and the only time I see any aggression is when another dog approaches HIM in an aggressive manner, if they approach politey, he's fine. I believe his basic nature is to be sweet and tolerant, but he cannot turn down a blatant offer to fight initiated by another dog. Fortunately, most people are smart enough not to let their aggressive dog get too close to a big Pit. He is willing to take orders from my elderly ACD/JRT mix, who is a bitch in both senses of the word, but who is not aggressive, just very, very bossy. He could care less about horses, much better with large animals than my two herders.

    Comment


    • #22
      Well, I know of some pits (through forums) that are great with cats and small dogs... my big lab would kill a cat if given the chance (but is fine with dogs, ignores small dogs an he is terrified of my daughter's small parrot!)... but cats... no way! I did not have the opportunity to teach him to respect cats and the only encounter was telling. I don't want to put anyone's cat through a repeat.. so we make sure he has no cat meeting!

      IOW, the breed does not mean anything in my books.

      Comment


      • #23
        While I wouldn't purposely look for a pit as a farm dog, I had one and she was wonderful. I picked this young female up off the side of a desolate country road coming home from my trainer's barn. I drove by this skin and bones dog, then stopped and backed up. I got out, opened the passenger door and called her. She ran and jumped in the seat and laid there like a perfect angel the whole ride home. She never bothered the other farm dogs, cats, horses or cattle. She even got along fine with the 3 Shar-pei I had at the time. (My Shar-pei had a wicked high prey drive- they were NEVER off leash or unfenced!) She did "put a hurtin" on the neighbor's nasty Chows that showed up at my farm and growled at me. I eventually found a new home for her because I had plenty of dogs already, and she was a wonderful companion for a couple of small children.

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        • Original Poster

          #24
          shakeytails-so, there is a way to know when you have "plenty of dogs"?

          Comment


          • #25
            Originally posted by lesson junkie View Post
            shakeytails-so, there is a way to know when you have "plenty of dogs"?
            When your husband says "if you bring one more home, I'm moving out". But I could talk him into a foster. Or two.

            Comment


            • #26
              Originally posted by lesson junkie View Post
              shakeytails-so, there is a way to know when you have "plenty of dogs"?
              Well, it's one those "I can't define it, but I know when it happens" things. At the time I had 3 Shar-pei in the house and 3 outside farm dogs- definitely plenty! Right now I've only got 2 house dogs and a farm dog, so definitely room for more if the right ones appear!

              Comment


              • #27
                I have a 95 lb pit cross that was cat aggressive from the get go. Got him as a 50lb puppy 4-5 months old. I had one cat that I could not let them interact with, but any cat that was not afraid of him he is fine with. I had a barn cat that was great with dogs, she was never afraid of him and with training and "leave it" he learned to be fine with her. Now have another barn cat who thinks he is a dog and he and my big dog get along just fine. So for me it can be very cat dependent, but with a tiny puppy I would think no issues what so ever. BTW this big pit cross is absolutely ruled by my 28 lb terrier!! Younger than he is too!

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                • Original Poster

                  #28
                  Today has been fine. I'm grateful that he looks a little better already. His little backbone is not as prominent, but he's got a ways to go. I vaccinated and dewormed yesterday, so he's on his way to getting better.

                  I'm gonna try to keep him. The cats have swatted him, and he avoids them. He doesn't fight over toys, he isn't aggressive over food, even though I'm sure he is still hungry. I'm feeding him 4 small meals a day. I know he's a baby yet, but it's a good start.

                  I bought a big pack of paper towels on the way home from riding this morning, and some pet-stain-begone cleaner. Now that I'm back in the puppy business, I'm gonna need them!

                  Thanks to all for the food for thought.

                  Comment


                  • #29
                    You're getting him so young, you have great opportunity to work with him and train him. I bet he will work out just fine for you. Good luck with the little guy!
                    Susan N.

                    Don't get confused between my personality & my attitude. My personality is who I am, my attitude depends on who you are.

                    Comment


                    • #30
                      I found a hound/pitt mix about 3 years ago. She was about 1.5-2 and had had litter of puppies recently.

                      She is my heart and soul! Our two elderly corgis dominate her. She ignores my cat. She is the sweetest thing you could ever imagine.

                      She has attacked dogs. 2 of them (no harm done, called her off, very apologetic). She will chase and take down things that run away from her quickly (part of me things that is the foxhound side). She has a type A personality and generally likes to play rough. When another dog (usually large) gets pissed off and goes at her, she will fight right back. With that in mind, she gets along with 95% of dogs. She does like to chase cats if they will run...

                      I will say the first time I ever heard her play with a dog (like rough house) I seriously thought she was mauling it...turns out that is her happy play with me voice. It does frighten some people.



                      "I kind of want to eat it but I kind of like playing with it...."
                      http://s65.photobucket.com/albums/h2...t=e70e900d.jpg

                      Comment


                      • #31
                        Originally posted by Schune View Post
                        one good swat on the muzzle is all it takes to teach them that the cats are furry demi-gods that must be obeyed and avoided at all costs.
                        Sounds like pit pup has learned that lesson.

                        Originally posted by make x it x so View Post
                        "OMG A PLAYMATE FOR ME? CAN I GO MOM CAN I CAN I CAN I?
                        Originally posted by My Two Cents View Post
                        The first thing I would do is try to find out if someone is missing him before I fell in love
                        True. Due diligence.

                        Originally posted by vacation1 View Post
                        Like many breeds, many do wonderfully as puppies but as they mature sexually (neutered or not), develop some level of intolerance for other dogs -

                        I'm curious, though, about this thread compared to the Rhodesian Ridgeback one where people are mostly saying "Look, this breed is not really good for what you want.
                        Vacation's point #1: True. The breed rescue folks say this. Watch that Pits and Parolees on Animal Planet. That lady says that, too. Some are fine. Some are not. Period. Won't really know until sexual maturity.

                        Vacation's point #2: I'll bite . Ridgies have a much tighter gene pool and are bred more selectively so there is not the vast variation you see in Pits. Google image 'pit bull' and you'll see everything from what looks like a Frenchie to a Dogue with an equal temperament range. Ridgebacks do not have such a huge variety so intentionally selected traits are more likely to appear than a dog off the side of the road.

                        Maybe I hope I'm not just a bleeding heart for pits. Can't see myself owning one now or in the next 10 years. Had a pit/chow mix show up on the farm from a house down the street that got it as a puppy to fight. Learned about the responsibility and liability of a serious, protective, guardy, poker-faced pooch. Quite chow-y from what I have now learned.

                        Comment


                        • #32
                          Originally posted by lesson junkie View Post
                          I picked up a Pit puppy out of the middle of the road this morning- about 8-9 weeks old, hungry, very thin, open sores, covered with fleas-what do you do, ya know?
                          what you do is *not* try to find its "rightful owner" before "falling in love."

                          hungry, emaciated, covered in open sores and fleas; and found in the middle of the road...? Whoever that pup came[ran?] from is more than likely not "missing" him, and doesn't deserve it back, in my opinion.

                          Just saying.



                          Originally posted by lesson junkie View Post
                          I'd like to keep him if I can-the humane society is covered up with pups just like this one, and I don't believe in passing the the responsibility to others if I don't have to. TIA
                          F-ing amazing. The world needs more people like you, lesson junkie.

                          Thank you for being the way you are.
                          Originally posted by Martha Drum
                          ...But I don't want to sit helmetless on my horse while he lies on the ground kicking a ball around without a bridle while Leatherface does an interpretive dance with his chainsaw around us.

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                          • Original Poster

                            #33
                            If this pup "belongs" to anybody, they don't deserve him. I picked him up in the middle of an overpass.

                            I had a friend who had a Rottie who closed his social calendar at age 2. My friend did all the right things-neutered, socialized, obedience work, and her dog still became untrustworthy around strangers. As she lived alone, she was okay with it, but she was always aware of the potential hazard. I'll cross that bridge if we come to it.

                            Bicoastal-the best dog I ever had was a Chow/G. Shep/Dobe cross-loyal, brave, smart, beautiful-if this little guy is half the dog he was, I will be pleased.

                            As far as the responsibility aspect, I've got a 4yo, 95lb. Doberman now-though, honestly, the old JRT is the one who's gonna bite!

                            Comment


                            • #34
                              Originally posted by reay6790 View Post
                              I found a hound/pitt mix about 3 years ago. She was about 1.5-2 and had had litter of puppies recently.

                              She is my heart and soul! Our two elderly corgis dominate her. She ignores my cat. She is the sweetest thing you could ever imagine.

                              She has attacked dogs. 2 of them (no harm done, called her off, very apologetic). She will chase and take down things that run away from her quickly (part of me things that is the foxhound side). She has a type A personality and generally likes to play rough. When another dog (usually large) gets pissed off and goes at her, she will fight right back. With that in mind, she gets along with 95% of dogs. She does like to chase cats if they will run...

                              I will say the first time I ever heard her play with a dog (like rough house) I seriously thought she was mauling it...turns out that is her happy play with me voice. It does frighten some people.



                              "I kind of want to eat it but I kind of like playing with it...."
                              http://s65.photobucket.com/albums/h2...t=e70e900d.jpg
                              My pit definitely sounds like she is mauling other dogs when she plays. It STILL scares me! However, its all in good fun.

                              Comment


                              • #35
                                Originally posted by Lynnwood View Post
                                As young as he is it really is very relevant how you raise and condition him.
                                For the most part this is true; however, pit bulls can be high prey drive dogs, and they sometimes do not fit in well with multi-dog households as they tend to have dog aggression issues. It really REALLY depends on the individual dog and not just how you raise and train them.

                                Sexually maturity in a pit bull generally doesn't occur until the dog is two years of age or so. They could be super fine and dandy with all of the other dogs in their household, and then NOT be.

                                Unfortunately, people mislabel breeds as "pit bulls." There is a distinct "type" that is a true pit bull, and they are not the ones weighing 100 lbs and look like "frog dogs." They are athletic, lean, and nimble. Males top out at 60 lbs or so max. (in breed standard speak.) They have a lean body with heavy muscling in the thighs and chest and around the jaw area as well.

                                If you want to take a chance on this little guy, perhaps you could find a behaviorist or trainer in your area that has experience with pit bulls and other bully breeds to help you learn the ins and outs of the breeds, what to look for in terms of dog aggression and prey drive, etc.

                                I love our pittie, but they are a unique breed that require a unique owner.

                                "I LOVE MICKEY MOUSE!"
                                http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v4...9sar/EARS2.jpg

                                Her impression of a "frog dog:"
                                http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v4...r/meetup5a.jpg

                                Hanging with her buds....
                                http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v4...meetup1-1a.jpg
                                If wishes were horses then beggars would ride...
                                DLA: Draft Lovers Anonymous
                                Originally posted by talkofthetown
                                As in, the majikal butterfly-fahting gypsy vanners.

                                Comment


                                • #36
                                  Originally posted by bludejavu View Post
                                  There is a long saga on here back in the archives of a very hungry pittie who showed up in my barn several years ago. She was approx. four years old and time went by as I tried to arrange to get her to a rescue in N. Carolina (another member on here). She stayed too long, stole my heart and she's a family member now. I never wanted a Pit Bull, but she just ignored my bad opinion and walked right into my heart. I've never regretted keeping her. She's funny, downright hilarious at times, loves the horses, loves my husband and would love our little house dog if she wasn't terrified of him.

                                  I say keep your puppy!


                                  (bolding mine)

                                  I don't really have anything to add to the discussion. I just wanted to point out this eloquent way of speaking to what our dogs often do. Thank you, bluedejavu!

                                  Comment


                                  • #37
                                    Originally posted by IdahoRider View Post
                                    I have fostered several Pit Bulls, and found them to be absolute joys to work and live with. However, there are a couple of issues that you really need to be aware of if you intend to keep this puppy.

                                    The first is that a dog's genetics are hardwired into them and no amount of training and socializing is going to preempt the genetics. The Pit Bull-type dogs were bred to be very, very dog aggressive and very, very easy for humans to handle. Dog-dog aggression was the desired trait and was selectively bred for. Over many, many, many generations.

                                    That being said, not every Pit Bull is a dog killing machine. Just like not every Border Collie is going to be a sheep herding fool. Sometimes purpose is lost in particular lines. Sometimes purpose skips a generation. Whatever the reason, some dogs just don't have that hardwired, purpose-driven behavior.

                                    I think it is wonderful that a breed/type such as the Pit Bull has such passionate supporters. But I also think that sometimes we do the dogs a disservice by thinking that some behaviors can be eliminated entirely with enough love, training and socializing. The truth is that a really "gamey" Pit Bull will never be trained, loved or socialized to the point where they wouldn't be a danger to other dogs. I worry that it lulls people into a false sense of security. We seem perfectly fine with the idea that a Labrador has ball crazy genetically hardwired in, but we seem less comfortable accepting that a Pit Bull could have dog aggression genetically set in the same way.

                                    The second issue to be aware of is that some dogs are okay with other dogs until they hit late adolescence/early adulthood and then they become much less tolerant. Or they might become very selective about which dogs they accept and which dogs they won't. And sometimes the signs of impending trouble are not picked up on and it ends up seeming as if one day they were good around other dogs and the next day they weren't.

                                    The website for Bad Rap Rescue in California has a lot of great advice and information about Pit Bulls. I think the addy is www.badrap.org

                                    This is a breed/type of dog that makes a wonderful companion. Happy, super loving and smart. Great with people of all ages. They have so much going for them. The ones that I have fostered have been hard to give up once they found their own family. But...be aware that you can do everything "right" and still end up with a dog that is not safe around other dogs.
                                    Sheilah
                                    +1 very good post.

                                    I have 3 Bully breeds (two are Pit Bull mixes, male & female, one is an intact male Amstaff) that live together with no issues whatsoever. I also have 2 cats, none of them have issues with the cats either.

                                    But, I don't discount my dogs genetics. I realize that they could decide to not like each other someday, and if that day comes, I will deal with it by crating & rotating, or doing whatever is necessary.

                                    Also, you can't post a thread about a puppy without pictures! I'm curious to see what he looks like, since many people put the label "Pit Bull" on puppies and they really don't look "Bully" at all.
                                    -Kady

                                    Comment


                                    • #38
                                      Originally posted by Oberon13 View Post


                                      (bolding mine)

                                      I don't really have anything to add to the discussion. I just wanted to point out this eloquent way of speaking to what our dogs often do. Thank you, bluedejavu!
                                      You're welcome and tonight I've got muddy paw prints to prove it!
                                      Susan N.

                                      Don't get confused between my personality & my attitude. My personality is who I am, my attitude depends on who you are.

                                      Comment


                                      • #39
                                        I typed up a big long message earlier, but sadly it disappeared into the interwebs.

                                        I have a island dog who I think is a pit mix. He is the best dog ever. I am not a dog person either. I came to the island saying no more animals in my life! I have 3 cats and 2 horses in the states, but Gummy wormed his way into my heart.

                                        He was a kennel dog that was up for adoption and he stole my heart. He is 6/7 years old. He is "dog agressive". I don't know if its due to genetics, kennel life, his life before the kennels, or him being a grumpy old man or all of the above.

                                        He has no incisors or canines as they were pulled because they were so rotted when he came in to be a kennel dog. He also had an embedded collar. I think he was owned by a local and just chained up and never had any proper dog socialization as a puppy. Living in a kennel did not help the situation, but from what I heard he was dog agressive when he came in granted he was a 4/5 yr old intact male.

                                        He has gotten much better with dogs, but he mainly just likes females and some select neutered males. On walks, he is not usual dog reactive unless one is agressive towards him, but even with that he is getting better.

                                        He is good with my roommate cats. I will never leave him unattended with them, but I would never leave any dog unattended with cats.

                                        Glad you are giving the puppy a chance!!

                                        Here are some pictures.

                                        Him and I on the beach: http://instagram.com/p/QIu1Q1ECT6/?f...o_user_message

                                        I am so cute: http://instagram.com/p/P5A4Y_ECWe/?f...o_user_message

                                        http://instagram.com/p/Jzzd5VkCd1/

                                        His tongue is usually out!
                                        http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a1...9/IMG_7270.jpg
                                        I love cats, I love every single cat....
                                        So anyway I am a cat lover
                                        And I love to run.

                                        Comment


                                        • #40
                                          Originally posted by Bicoastal View Post
                                          Ridgies have a much tighter gene pool and are bred more selectively so there is not the vast variation you see in Pits. Google image 'pit bull' and you'll see everything from what looks like a Frenchie to a Dogue with an equal temperament range. Ridgebacks do not have such a huge variety so intentionally selected traits are more likely to appear than a dog off the side of the road.
                                          That's a good point about the smaller population of Rhodesian Ridgebacks. However, pit bulls are not coming from a diverse source; they're all coming from people who select for DA. While there may be some more exotic mixes out there, the people who have created the overpopulation problem aren't interested in breeds that aren't "fighting" breeds. I doubt more than a handful of Rhodesian Ridgebacks are being used, world-wide, to hunt big cats. Millions of pit bulls are still being used as "fighting" dogs. The odds of your average pit bull coming from "fighting" background are very, very high. True, that might not be a formal breeding program with any real smarts in it, but any idiot can perpetuate high DA in a line by breeding dogs who have the most sucess in the ring.

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