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Help, dog chews everything in site.

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  • Help, dog chews everything in site.

    Background: Pound puppy, probably boxer mix, maybe some pit in there too, but very good around people and other dogs. She is about 6-7 months old and we have had her for about 2 months. She is in training and smart but lordy, does that dog chew up stuff. Within the last week, the count is 4 pairs of shoes, three sunglasses, the cord on the lawnmower, 4 books, underwear and a canister of floss. In addition, she digs and the thing that takes the cake is digging around the sewer cleanouts and unscrewing the caps.

    I have bought chew toys, rawhide bones, put out food morning and night, exercised her by running her along side my bicycle with other dog for up to 45 minutes We have even doused things with Jojokia chile juice(the hottest chile ever aka ghost chile) That she just licked and slobbered, took a drink and went back to chewing. Any suggestions. By the way she does this when we are asleep and not home. We do have a very large fenced backyard with grass and trees. Perfect dog home but why does she chew

  • #2
    Not home ...she goes in crate...asleep...she goes in crate...

    When you are home, she doesn't leave youe sight. This is accomplished by having a leash on her, other end attached to you, so you can correct/redirect her if she attempts to chew.
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."

    Comment


    • #3
      Crate.
      What's wrong with you?? Your cheese done slid off its cracker?!?!

      Comment


      • #4
        Crate when not supervised!
        Don't leave anything out that you don't want her to chew - don't worry, this should not be forever.

        Make sure you have something she *likes* to chew on...something softer or harder or tastier or...??? One of my dogs only liked to chew on ropes or cloth toys, one liked rubbery toys, one wanted bones.
        Experiment.

        Comment


        • #5
          Train her as well. It's not all about physical exercise, it's about mental exercise as well. Learn how to use a marker word or a clicker and start to teach her basic obedience and tricks.

          sit
          lie down
          get off
          get on
          stay
          sit up
          roll over
          fetch
          hold that thing
          find that thing
          touch that with your nose
          touch that with your paw
          touch that with your shoulder

          toss a handful of dry dog food in the yard and let her sniff it out

          hide her fav squeaky toy behind a bush and have her help you follow your track to the toy

          find a doggy friend she can play hard with

          there are all sorts of things you can do with her that will help to tire her out which will help the chewing.

          Besides that, as the other poster said, this too shall pass.

          And by the way, this is about the right age I begin to get calls from people. 8-12 month old dogs are like teenagers. They run an adrenalin and don't think much which makes them a little hard to live with.

          Comment


          • #6
            Perfect dog home but why does she chew
            because she's a puppy. Puppies chew. Up through age 2 in some breeds.

            The key is constant supervision- the pup is either being carefully supervised by a person (this means the person is actually next to the pup and watching the pup with 100% of attention on pup), pup is tethered to a person, pup is in a carefully puppy-proofed area, or the pup is in crate.

            If the puppy gets hold of something and chews it, it means you aren't watching her carefully enough.

            if you are watching her, and she tries to chew something inappropriate, you gently direct her to a more acceptable chew item.

            as for the digging, that's also about a lack of supervision. Many people have success with digging by providing a special digging area- much as you provide proper chewing items to serve that need, you can cure the digging need by providing a special digging area, where you encourage the dog to dig. A sandbox or something. And if the dog digs elsewhere, you gently re-direct the dog to dig in the box.

            -you shouldn't run a dog her age off a bicycle like that, you can damage the pup's joints. Until the dog's growth plates close NO FORCED STEADY EXERCISE.
            Dr. Zink, noted dog sport vet, suggests not doing any kind of "endurance exercises", such as forced running/jogging, until after age 14 months.
            A pup under age 14 months should get plenty of free play time, short walks, short off-leash runs through woods or other natural terrain; lots of obedience and trick training; lots of work on developing body coordination and muscle strength; but no jumping over anything higher than the dog's elbow.

            chewing things up isn't about her not being tired, it's about her not being supervised. Puppies just chew. Puppies view all objects as: if you can't chew it, or eat it, or rip it up, what good is it?

            Comment


            • #7
              Ad take this very seriously. Dental floss will literally shred a dogs intestines. Not that all foreign bodies aren't potentially deadly, but linear things, ESP something as fine and sharp as dental floss will do unimaginable damage before you even know she is sick.

              Seriously a crate and some seriously hardy toys like kongs are your best bet. If you cannot handle the intense supervision this pup needs then get a basket muzzle and make her wear it anytime she is out of the crate. Period.
              You can't fix stupid.... but you can breed it!

              Comment


              • #8
                Puppies are no different than human babies in their need for supervision. You have to do your best to puppy proof your house and supervise to make sure you didn't miss anything. Crate when unsupervised. This is a people problem not a dog problem.
                McDowell Racing Stables

                Home Away From Home

                Comment


                • #9
                  If a puppy cannot distinguish between puppy toys and human things then it needs to be supervised constantly and crated whenever you can't supervise (even if it's only while you use the restroom).

                  In time puppy will learn to appreciate awesome life but right now puppy thinks that awesome life includes chewing on anything that fits in her mouth. She will only learn if you are consistent and don't let her have opportunities to fail. Remember no one ever told puppies that yummy tasting things like shoes are off-limits.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by SuckerForHorses View Post
                    Not home ...she goes in crate...asleep...she goes in crate...

                    When you are home, she doesn't leave youe sight. This is accomplished by having a leash on her, other end attached to you, so you can correct/redirect her if she attempts to chew.
                    This. A lot.

                    She is a baby and at the age where her adult teeth are coming in and settling. This is not fun and she wants to chew and chew and chew to relieve it. Her mix tells us that this will not be a short or easy process for her. Not that she's bad, just that physically, she'll teethe longer.
                    She's not trying to be bad. Ever had a toothache? Her jaw hurts, and chewing helps.

                    GraceLikeRain nailed it as well. Right now, that pup is surrounded by opportunities to fail. You have to set up the situation where all she can do is the right thing to do.
                    If she is in her crate with a raw marrow bone and a stuffed kong = ALL she can choose is the right thing to chew.
                    If she is loose in the house ... The couch didn't work, maybe she needs something harder, the table leg didn't help her feel better, maybe she needs something smaller, the dental floss just vanished, she needs to find something else...
                    (btw, you are SO lucky she lived through the dental floss, that is a pup killer)

                    AFTER you've made sure she's not running about unsupervised;
                    More exercise. Is the once a day all she gets? Give her another short run at least.
                    Grannick's bitter apple spray on things you don't want her to chew. It will NOT work by itself, you still need to supervise, but it will help.
                    You said she's in training, is this a class? Try a class. Do agility. It's awesome.
                    Train her to dig on command. It is a great way to never need to bend over to pull a weed again.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Crate. Two years? It took my collie 5. She could get into anything, open drawers, cabinets, refrigerator. She was in her crate or with me. We tried her at 4, she pulled my husband's pills off the top of his highboy (stupid I know, and so does he...I made sure he knew how stupid), ate a bunch, ended up in doggie ICU. We brought her home and she promptly went into my daughter's bathroom and started chowing down on a pumice stone. Back to the crate for another year. We didn't lock her in at night after the first couple of years, but she preferred to sleep in the crate.

                      BTW with the collie, those nice little latches on the crate? She could pick them open in less than 10 minutes. A carabiner took a bit longer. We ended up with two carabiners.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Six to seven month old puppy from a mouthy breed? You are so screwed without better supervision. I came home one day to find my two standard poodle puppies had moved my couch into the center of the room to make for easier dismemberment. Their favorite sleeping chair has a row of toothmarks along the wooden arm - they used to nibble it to soothe themselves to sleep. With this amount of damage from a soft mouthed breed, I can't imagine leaving one of the bully breeds unsupervised.

                        I give my guys plastic bottles to chew on, usually milk jugs or water bottles. They enjoy the feel of being able to crush something in their jaws. My guys, as I said, are a soft mouthed breed, so they don't chew the bottles into dangerous sized pieces. They just crush it flat. You'd want to watch your dog carefully and take the bottle away if the bottle starts coming apart.

                        Comment

                        • Original Poster

                          #13
                          thank you guys for all the encouragement

                          I posted this am before work while just as frustrated as could be. Last night she chewed up my hubby's favorite ball cap and expensive sunglasses that were on the hatrack at my shoulder level. Of course it was my fault. (because I adopted her) We do have another dog, shepard ridgeback cross. The two of them are thick as thieves and just egg each other on. When they play, they really "wrassel". This is not the first dog nor the first puppy I have had but this one is the mouthiest. We had a border collie who was agility trained and had perfect manners but when the sprinklers came on, attacked them and then had the gall to rip a hole in my wall by the door when we put him inside. We found the floss packaging, not the canister so we have been watching the two of them carefully and our vet knows about it. So far so good as everyone's insides seem to be working as I am the yard cleaner.

                          I am working with her on obedience training. I have not had a boxer/pit type before and I just did not realize they would be so mouthy

                          Thanks again

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Reminds me of the movie "Hooch".

                            Puppies do chew. It is normal. I also think puppies need to be near their person a lot, like all the time, or supervised by someone. Not crated and bored while someone is at work all day. Our kids are lucky, they have us to dog-sit for them and the Boxer never did get chewy except her own toys. She was crated for short times when not supervised. She's the best.
                            Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Any of the shorter jawed or smush faced dogs (boxers, pugs, etc) will just have a harder time teething. It takes longer for their adult teeth to settle. And again, getting molars in hurts, chewing relieves the pain.

                              Happily this is balanced by the fact that your average boxer isn't as orally fixated as your average Golden. Not THAT can be some destruction. As my husband found out when he didn't crate our adolescent (I wasn't home) because he "was just going to be a few minutes". The wall and doorframe took the most damage, but the shredded phonebook made an impressive display scattered across the living room and kitchen.

                              Only one sure cure for puppy chewing. Supervision and confinement when you can't have supervision. That and time.

                              Sorry your husband is giving you a hard time over the pup acting like a pup. That sure doesn't help

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Second, third, fourth, the supervision and, in addition, trying to stop inappropriate chewing before it happens! Here's the situation we got into and you'd want to prevent it . Our young BC and something mix was VERY big on chewing as a puppy...everything, window sills, baseboards, funiture, shoes, etc... We did supervise her, she was never alone and loose, but we didn't routinely crate, though she is crate trained.

                                She has always been desperate for attention, she wants all the attention all the time. She'd get into something to chew that wasn't a toy of hers and someone would go running over and stop her or take it from her, substituting something appropriate. She liked the attention! At 15 months now, she isn't as compelled to chew 24/7 as she was when she was teething, but she had learned that a guaranteed way to get a person to pay attention to her was to get something she knows she shouldn't have and start chewing it up. She doesn't eat the things she chews, just tears them to bits.

                                We can actually leave her alone in the house and loose at night, because she ONLY chews when someone is home and awake. She's alone, loose, (with old ACD) for three hours every workday, dog walker comes and takes her out for a couple of hourse, then she's alone for another two hours. NO CHEWING or destruction happens while we're away, she's good as gold. As soon as we're home, it starts. At night, if I'm asleep, nothing, but if she knows I'm awake because I'm stirring or reading, she gets stuff to chew. I have to pretend to be asleep to get any sleep .

                                She even knows what belongs to who and will get something that belongs to the specific person she wants attention from. Yesterday, my husband came home from work and didn't give her the usual "I'm sooo happy to see you" routine when he came in the door. She went right upstairs, jumped up onto his dresser so she was standing on it (don't know how she did that) and started rummaging through the stuff on it, choosing something she thought he'd care enough about to stop her from chewing it up. It's very annoying, though I am thankful that we can leave her alone uncrated and she's fine, I guess that's better than constant chewing.

                                We've apparently inadvertently trained her to do this, by stopping the chewing when she was younger, rather than preventing it from happening in the first place. I guess we should have crated/tied her to us at all times in the house through the teething stage. Still trying to figure out a way to get a handle on it. When I'm doing something that can't be interrupted (like cooking something on the stove or am on a conference call for work), she goes in the crate or someone takes her outside to play. If we wear her out enough with activity and fun games, she'll sleep on the couch while we get stuff done.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by marianne View Post
                                  I posted this am before work while just as frustrated as could be. Last night she chewed up my hubby's favorite ball cap and expensive sunglasses that were on the hatrack at my shoulder level. Of course it was my fault. (because I adopted her) We do have another dog, shepard ridgeback cross. The two of them are thick as thieves and just egg each other on. When they play, they really "wrassel". This is not the first dog nor the first puppy I have had but this one is the mouthiest. We had a border collie who was agility trained and had perfect manners but when the sprinklers came on, attacked them and then had the gall to rip a hole in my wall by the door when we put him inside. We found the floss packaging, not the canister so we have been watching the two of them carefully and our vet knows about it. So far so good as everyone's insides seem to be working as I am the yard cleaner.

                                  I am working with her on obedience training. I have not had a boxer/pit type before and I just did not realize they would be so mouthy

                                  Thanks again
                                  If you're not going to keep the dog crated or under constant supervision, you have to remove anything she might be able to reach and then two feet higher. Lock it up, put it away. Sunglasses in drawer, cap in closet. Never leave anything out except for dog approved chewables. It's really not hard, and your house will look so very clean with no clutter.

                                  Comment

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