• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Dogs in Apartments

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Dogs in Apartments

    I've been thinking about this a lot recently and would like some opinions. What do you think about having a dog in an apartment? How often do you think the dog should be taken outside? Whats the maximum size dog you'd want in say a 1-2 bedroom apartment? I've only ever had dogs in houses with ample space, but know when I move back to the states I'll very likely be living in an apartment but will finally be in a position to be thinking about a pet.

    I've been contemplating whether it's too much to ask for a dog to live in a fairly small apartment, obviously with ample time outside/walking? I live in Paris now, and I know plenty of people here have their dogs in small apartments, but that doesn't necessarily mean its right for the dogs.
    "Choose to chance the rapids, and dare to dance the tides" - Garth Brooks
    "With your permission, dear, I'll take my fences one at a time" - Maggie Smith, Downton Abbey

  • #2
    My Shiba Inu lives in an apartment with me and she doesn't seem the worse for wear. I take her for a 3 mile run in the mornings, my SO takes her for a long walk around noon, and then I take her for another long walk when I get home from work. She also gets to go to the barn with me on weekends. It works for us.

    Not sure I'd want a larger dog in the apartment though. And I definitely wouldn't want anything with excessive energy levels. I can only handle so many miles a day.

    But if you're committed to getting your dog enough exercise and if you're careful about your choice of breed, I think dogs in apartments are just fine.
    "Are you yawning? You don't ride well enough to yawn. I can yawn, because I ride better than you. Meredith Michael Beerbaum can yawn. But you? Not so much..."
    -George Morris

    Comment


    • #3
      http://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/sh...ogs+apartments

      I have a little Beagle/Schnauzer mix in a small two bedroom apartment and he does fine with at least 4 long walks a day. To me the size doesn't matter so much as the energy level does. I have a friend who has a greyhound in her apartment and he does fine with less walks then my little energizer bunny. If your willing to do right by your dog, and take him out multiple, not two, times a day then it should be fine. Dogs are very adaptable!
      www.diaryofahunterprincess.wordpress.com

      Comment

      • Original Poster

        #4
        ^Thanks for the link! I broke my own rule by not doing a search before posting, whooops.

        And thanks for above info....along the lines of what I was thinking, consider breed/energy level carefully, multiple walks and hopefully trips to a dog park.
        "Choose to chance the rapids, and dare to dance the tides" - Garth Brooks
        "With your permission, dear, I'll take my fences one at a time" - Maggie Smith, Downton Abbey

        Comment


        • #5
          Animal Planet has a really cute series of videos on dogs called "Dogs 101" that is available on youtube. It's not necessarily the bible of dog breeds (they say some stuff that is a little ), but at the end of each little breed episode, they give a brief summary of grooming requirements, if it's a good breed for an apartment/house/needs a giant field to run in, etc.

          Plus, you get to see cute puppies! My boyfriend and I have watched this and geeked out... oftener than I should admit.

          Comment


          • #6
            It's definitely more about the temperment than the size. I used to live in a 1 bedroom apartment with my 130 lb great dane no problem, but like you said, it's all about them getting proper excercise and attention.

            Also, one thing that I don't think anyone's mentioned yet- barking. It varies on the apartment complex, but there are many where you (or your dog) can and will be evicted if you dog is an incessant barker. Definitely keep this in mind when choosing a dog, and be prepared to use a no-bark collar or other means if necessary. Especially if the dog has separation anxiety, this can be your biggest issue, and really stressful to figure out! Nothing like finding out your new dog barks the whole time you're gone, and having a week to figure it out before you're not allowed to have him in the apartment any longer.... ask me how I know!
            High Quality Tack Resale

            Comment


            • #7
              I live in Paris now, and I know plenty of people here have their dogs in small apartments, but that doesn't necessarily mean its right for the dogs.
              well, what exactly do you think is somehow different between keeping a dog in a house vs. an apartment? Right now, five dog-owning people around me are at work while their dogs are at home. I took a poll:

              Person 1: lives in a house with an unfenced yard. Dogs are crated all day.
              Person 2: lives in a house with a small fenced yard. Dogs are kept inside the house all day.
              Person 3: lives in a house with an unfenced yard. Dogs are kept inside the house all day.
              Person 4: lives in a house with a fenced yard. Dogs are crated all day.
              Person 5: lives in an apartment with an unfenced "common area" yard. Dogs are kept inside the apartment all day.

              After work, everyone says they take their dogs for a walk, and then the dogs are all inside the dwelling with them the rest of the evening.
              In the morning before work, the two people with fenced yards put the dogs outside in the yard briefly; all of the other people take their dogs for walks in the morning.

              If you check around, the presence of a fenced yard vs. not having a fenced yard affects dogs a lot more than whether the dog lives in an apartment vs. a house. My own polls and observations suggest dogs who live in places with fenced yards tend to get a lot less exercise than dogs who live in places without fenced yards, because the "fenced yard" is used by the owner as an excuse to not formally exercise the dog. Most dogs don't get much, if any, exercise from just being let out into a yard.

              People with and without yards all report the average number of outings- letting the dog out, walking the dog briefly for potty purposes- to be four per day (for adult dogs, not puppies), and usually one or two "exercise" outings per day (which are combined with the potty outings), so think three "potty walks" and one "real" walk.

              As for real exercise, check the breed listings. Most of the "is this the right breed for you" books/sites will rate the breed's exercise needs on a low/moderate/high scale. A dog with "moderate" exercise needs will need at least an hour a day of brisk exercise (more energetic than just leash walking); a dog with "low" exercise needs will need at least 30 minutes a day of brisk walking; and unless you're looking for a vigorous sporting/working companion, avoid the breeds listed as having "high" exercise needs.

              Many people suggest "small dogs" do best in apartments, but many of the small dogs are super-active terriers, who run around all day trying to find vermin to kill; these dogs aren't going to be happy in a small space. Personally, I think some of the large, laid-back draft breeds, or couch-potato types like greyhounds, would do much better in a small apartment/house, since they prefer to sleep soundly inbetween owner-initiated/involved exercise periods. Plus they are less likely to bark all the time.

              Comment


              • #8
                I posted in the link provided by another poster.

                But as you know in Paris, there are dogs everywhere. They all seemed well adjusted to living on a leash in the city. I am not sure what area you are in. I stayed across from the Luxembourg gardens and saw dogs being walked in there all the time.

                And they all seem totally cool with sitting at a cafe with their owner. I never heard another dog bark at another one, or saw an owner fighting with their dog on a leash.

                I am not sure about the dog food over there, every dog I saw had a flat, dull coat and looked unhealthy.
                www.facebook.com/doggonegoodgoodies
                http://doggonebakedgoods.com/

                Comment


                • #9
                  I have, um, several wee dogs who live indoors 100% of the time. I have a small courtyard and some flowerbeds, a la New Orleans, and they go out there a couple times a day just to sniff around and pee/poop, but they are perfectly happy indoor pups. I think if you choose a breed that likes pampering as opposed to a dog that prefers to run and swim in a pond, you will be fine. I was never a small dog person until I got my first little dog.
                  SPAY/NEUTER/RESCUE/ADOPT!
                  Little Star Chihuahua Rescue
                  The Barkalicious Bakery
                  On Facebook!!!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    The key to a happy life with a dog is daily exhaustion. Some dogs get there sooner than others.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Not an issue at all so long as the energy level isn't through the roof or the dog is a huge barker. the lack of a fenced in yard can be a good thing for a dog in that it kind of forces interactive exercise with the owner (unless of course the owner is a jacka## who won't adapt to higher exercise needs and then decides to dump the dog... But that's not what you sound like, op lol).
                      Aside from a big dog stampeding through the place or wrestling with another dog and barking a lot, there's not much else different from having a house without a yard. My dogs are almost never more than one room away from me even if we're in a large house.... usually they're right next to my chair!

                      When looking at apartments, it is really nice to have a safe place for the dog to be off leash nearby, be it a dog park or in-community yard. MrB and i used to drive all the way from one side of town to the other in order to go to the dog park, every day. I won't lie, there were social benefits for us the humans in going (heck, that's where we met!) But it was a hassle and time waster... But the Australian Shepherd would have it no other way!!

                      I'll add, if you know the area where you'll be settling, look into the weight limits of the apartment complexes. I looked for places to live in my town and it seemed like most had a 45lb limit. I ended up choosing a studio that had a 25 lb limit and then did my dog search after that (it was a REALLY NICE studio loft!). The dog i got was 27ish lbs at the time, grew to be 31,but it was close enough for management not to care.

                      All that said, mrb and i now have SIX dogs and live in the country, so no more city limit living, nevermind apartments, for us for quite some years to come!

                      Comment

                      • Original Poster

                        #12
                        Originally posted by MunchingonHay View Post
                        I posted in the link provided by another poster.

                        But as you know in Paris, there are dogs everywhere. They all seemed well adjusted to living on a leash in the city. I am not sure what area you are in. I stayed across from the Luxembourg gardens and saw dogs being walked in there all the time.

                        And they all seem totally cool with sitting at a cafe with their owner. I never heard another dog bark at another one, or saw an owner fighting with their dog on a leash.

                        I am not sure about the dog food over there, every dog I saw had a flat, dull coat and looked unhealthy.
                        See your last point is exactly what bugs me. None of the dogs I see here (I actually live in a western suburb of Paris, but its still mainly apartments/small houses with little to no outside space) look very happy/healthy. You see them being tied up in front of the Monoprix, and they just look miserable. I guess I just think there's a difference between being well adjusted to something and actually happy/healthy.

                        wendy - your poll is interesting, I guess in my experience growing up our dog had more of a 'farm' situation than you are describing as we lived in the country. We had a HUGE yard (4 acres) which he had free rein of. He had a dog door+ underground electric fence set very low. Actually, once he knew it was there he never tested it and we rarely even had it on. We never had any problems with him escaping. It was one of those country "neighbourhoods" (~2 miles between each house haha) where everyone knew everyone/everyones pets. I took him on walks after school, more for my benefit than his, or when I got older to the barn with me. He went on longer hikes almost every weekend. I've just never really lived with dogs in a city/town environment and wanted peoples opinions.

                        It's good to know that this can work. I trust you guys as conscientious pet owners when you say given the situation/carefully choosing a dog and caring for it properly, a dog can be happy in the kind of environment I'm describing. I wont be in a hurry to choose and will be fully honest with myself and rescues about my situation. It's so hard not to fall in love with them all!
                        "Choose to chance the rapids, and dare to dance the tides" - Garth Brooks
                        "With your permission, dear, I'll take my fences one at a time" - Maggie Smith, Downton Abbey

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Retired Racing Greyhounds make good apartment dogs.

                          They sleep all day and are very lazy, as well as quiet and clean.
                          I know several people who have Greyhounds - one has 3 - in apartments.

                          We have 3 of them, but live in a house in the country with a fenced yard. They cannot be lot off leash in an unfenced area dut to their high prey drive and bred-in instincts to chase and run.

                          They do a few 'zoomies' up and down the yard in the morning and then sleep for the rest of the day.
                          They need little exercise ...Greyhound racers are 'sprinters', not 'long-distance' runners.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I by no means meant to offend you with my statement, it was just an observation. I remember seeing lots of dogs with dull, unbrushed and dirty coats.
                            I didn't say they were unhappy, I said their coats made them look unhealthy.
                            www.facebook.com/doggonegoodgoodies
                            http://doggonebakedgoods.com/

                            Comment

                            • Original Poster

                              #15
                              Originally posted by MunchingonHay View Post
                              I by no means meant to offend you with my statement, it was just an observation. I remember seeing lots of dogs with dull, unbrushed and dirty coats.
                              I didn't say they were unhappy, I said their coats made them look unhealthy.
                              No don't worry, you didn't offend me at all, and I'm sorry if it came across that way! I was trying to agree with you that I've noticed the same thing, but add that to me, a lot (definitely not all, but a lot) of dogs here don't seem very happy. I mean really, do people think dogs want to go clothes shopping with their owners, or be left at monoprix for an hour while they grocery shop? It's one thing to sit outside at a cafe with your dog, but it's another to leave it tied in front of a store for an hour. I guess that's why I asked about dogs and city life - there has to be a happy medium, I just haven't seen much evidence of it here in France.
                              "Choose to chance the rapids, and dare to dance the tides" - Garth Brooks
                              "With your permission, dear, I'll take my fences one at a time" - Maggie Smith, Downton Abbey

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                We have a 9 month old mastiff puppy and my sister and I live in a 2 bedroom apartment with her cat too. He is in his crate when we are gone to work but that is because he is still in his puppy, I need to chew everything up stage. He goes to the barn on weekends, for a walk as much as we can get fit in during the week. We also take him to the dog park on weekends which is right near a off leash set of trails which he loves.
                                One man's wrong lead is another man's counter-canter -Steven D. Price

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Another greyhound fan here. Ours is such a couch potato. As previously mentioned, they cannot be allowed off-leash unless they are properly fenced. We live on a small horse farm and as much as I'd love to let her run, she manages well with our daily walks. In fact, when we take her to the dog park to let her stretch her legs, she prefers visiting with the other dog owners over a sprint around the park. Greyhounds are known as "40 mph couch potatoes".

                                  Comment

                                  Working...
                                  X