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Thank you for your patience & a grooming tool question!

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  • Thank you for your patience & a grooming tool question!

    Well, it wasn't time wasted.

    I found the PERFECT dog on Kijiji (our Craigslist equivalent). A rehoming situation.

    A 10 month-old bitch, a supposedly Lab/Husky cross. I think not. She's got a long double coat coat ressembling more that of a Shetland or a Collie. But we can see the Husky... Probably more of a Golden/Husky/Sheperd dog type mix... Anyways, perfect I tell you.

    Gorgeous, friendly, took to farm life right away as if she had always been here and LOVES, LOVES kids!

    I am beyond thrilled. She's now named Ikuma ("Ee-ku-mah" which means "Fire" in Inuktitut!)

    http://ow.ly/i/yv0p (Picture!)

    Now, as far as grooming goes. She's not a fan of a slicker brush, and I saw that great YouTube vid about grooming a long coated Collie, so what would be the best idea to really tackle the undercoat?

    She's getting a GOOD bath today or tomorrow... Got skunked already, of course, as she got loose the first night she got here. Never since. Learned her lesson maybe? Thankfully, she sleeps in the barn so it doesn't matter too much! (Except for my hands stinking...)

    www.EquusMagnificus.ca
    Breeding & Sales
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  • #2
    Emryss on the other thread is a pro (or was) groomer and she uses a greyhound comb. Tho the one I picked up is not a greyhound, it does have both the fine and medium spaced teeth.

    I, personally like a pin brush.

    Comment

    • Original Poster

      #3
      Oh gosh! I looked them up... There are a gazillion choices.

      Hmmm...
      www.EquusMagnificus.ca
      Breeding & Sales
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      • #4
        Congratulations!

        She looks like the rare and famous Shaggy Dog, only found in better places such as Kijiji.

        Last dog I had with a coat like that, I found that the Furminator was great - I'd groom in small bouts, so the dog didn't get too miserable - some love it, some hate it.

        Good luck with the bath - don't forget to use detangling conditioner, which will make grooming MUCH easier.

        Comment


        • #5
          my two cents & look at this vid!

          If you are bathing her anyway, use a hair dryer.

          Look at the hair flying! Of course that is an HV dryer but I am finding my regular ole' blow dryer does help get loose hair out. I love it .

          In the slicker thread, experts said don't brush to the skin. With a greyhound comb, I think the intent is to brush to the skin. I'm learning, too. After diligently pin brushing every week often multiple times/week for months plus baths ~every 2 weeks, I had mats in my Pap's culottes and ear fringe . It was mainly clumps of undercoat the pin brush floated right over.

          Blowdrying with my handheld while combing allows me to see the skin, blast out undercoat, and actually seems to make brushing easier. I start with looong, widely-spaced tines to get to the bottom. Then I used a comb with more narrow-spacing. Blowing the hair in the direction you wish to comb it kinda lays the hair right for the brush stroke. It's great!

          Comment


          • #6
            Honestly, if its a husky mix, the dog probably is going to object to whatever type of brushing you do. I groom dogs for a living and I know very few huskies/husky mixes who don't loudly protest being brushed with pretty much any tool I have.

            The most effective ones are Mars combs and Furminators.

            Put some Show Sheen (or equivalent) on the dog to make your life easier.

            Easiest thing to do with that type of dog is to get a high velocity dryer like we have at the shop and blast the undercoat out. Blast the dog before the bath, bathe it, dry it part way with the high velocity dryer, spray on a bit of Show Sheen and finish drying. Husky types don't like the dryer much either, but they seem to figure out that its less objectionable than brushing.

            Comment


            • #7
              Grooming comb.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by LauraKY View Post
                Grooming comb.
                This ^ greyhound comb and a spray bottle filled with water or some detangler. Put dog on table - you'll have an easier time.
                You are what you dare.

                Comment


                • #9
                  For the skunk smell- Massengil Vinegar and Water douche. Dump a few bottles on dry dog, rub in and leave on. Do not rinse out. You can lightly towel dry when done.

                  They smell like a salad but not like skunk.
                  Oh, well, clearly you're not thoroughly indoctrinated to COTH yet, because finger pointing and drawing conclusions are the cornerstones of this great online community. (Tidy Rabbit)

                  Comment

                  • Original Poster

                    #10
                    Thanks for the tips!

                    She doesn't object to grooming per say, she objects to the slicker brush.

                    I spent some time removing some burrs yesterday (farm dog, must have burrs apparently) and she just laid there with me and my three year-old (almost!) coming away burrs. Happy to have some lovin'.

                    I'll try the grooming comb and yes, I had stocked up on horse detangler. She's going to smell and look great when I get around to giving her the now famous bath.

                    She's so darn cute!

                    I'm just a tad gaga.
                    www.EquusMagnificus.ca
                    Breeding & Sales
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                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by candysgirl View Post
                      Honestly, if its a husky mix, the dog probably is going to object to whatever type of brushing you do.
                      yes...

                      You have good advice here. Can't add much, really!

                      For what it's worth, your dog looks more like a rough collie mix to me. Doesn't make much difference - they're vocal, too!

                      Someday, I'll have to make a video of how I use a slicker. Most of the time, dogs don't object once they figure out that A) I'm gonna brush them anyway, and B) it doesn't hurt all that much.

                      I use that slicker from tips of hair down *to* the skin, but not *on* the skin. I hook the undercoat and flip it out. On dogs that tend to want to sit while I am brushing their pants, I will kneel on the ground and have the dog straddled over my knee, so he can't sit. It works pretty good for me, but I am a rather short, heavy-ish and strong person - it's hard to knock me over. Might not work for someone with a higher center of gravity.

                      Pretty dog. Congratulations on your new friend!
                      Don't tell me about what you can't do. That's boring. Show me what you can do. - Mom

                      Comment

                      • Original Poster

                        #12
                        Originally posted by Emryss View Post
                        For what it's worth, your dog looks more like a rough collie mix to me. Doesn't make much difference - they're vocal, too!
                        That's what I thought too! She has the Husky "talk" down to an art though. It's a-do-ra-ble! I never thought I'd like a talkative dog...

                        I'll try to look up on YouTube for a video of your technique...
                        www.EquusMagnificus.ca
                        Breeding & Sales
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                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by EquusMagnificus View Post

                          I'll try to look up on YouTube for a video of your technique...
                          I haven't made one yet! All I have are a couple of Cavaliers and a poodle - I'm not silly enough to saddle myself with a big, double-coated dog that actually takes work to keep up! I have enough to do!

                          I'll talk to a friend with a shop soon and see if she'd mind loaning me a bath dog to help people out...
                          Don't tell me about what you can't do. That's boring. Show me what you can do. - Mom

                          Comment

                          • Original Poster

                            #14


                            I meant looking for a video of someone else using your technique...

                            So you hold the coat up and brush from your hand down, to free the coat from your hand?
                            www.EquusMagnificus.ca
                            Breeding & Sales
                            Facebook | YouTube

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by EquusMagnificus View Post


                              I meant looking for a video of someone else using your technique...

                              So you hold the coat up and brush from your hand down, to free the coat from your hand?
                              That's the way. I start from the lowest, furthest corner of the dog (usually just above the hocks and around the stifles of jacket-coated (collies, huskies, etc.) breeds, or the hind toes of drop coated (Yorkies, Maltese) breeds so that I am not trying to brush through undercoat or mats. I want smooth sailing underneath me!

                              If I can't see the skin, I will work from the tips of the hair back until I can. Soft, felted undercoat picks apart relatively easily. The hard wads that are often found at the sit-upon areas may need to be broken up with some sort of splitter - make sure to split what you can see, only, and split at a 90* angles, away from the skin. You try to follow the lay of the hair, and you risk fileting the dog.

                              Also - take your time. There's no rule that the dog has to be completely brushed in one go if he's in rough shape. Divide and conquer. Make the task as enjoyable as you can for both of you. That means treat breaks, maybe a trick or two - whatever it takes that neither of you get too tired or frustrated.
                              Don't tell me about what you can't do. That's boring. Show me what you can do. - Mom

                              Comment

                              • Original Poster

                                #16
                                Thank you Emryss!

                                Yes, this will have to be enjoyable for her as I have lots of "help" from my almost 3 year-old daughter... Slowly but surely, and certainly, divide and conquer.

                                Now I can't wait to be done with office work to get out and brush her!

                                Here's a few more pics of the beast so you can see her coat. Just in case you had pictured it differently!
                                www.EquusMagnificus.ca
                                Breeding & Sales
                                Facebook | YouTube

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by Emryss View Post
                                  I haven't made one yet! All I have are a couple of Cavaliers and a poodle - I'm not silly enough to saddle myself with a big, double-coated dog that actually takes work to keep up! I have enough to do!

                                  I'll talk to a friend with a shop soon and see if she'd mind loaning me a bath dog to help people out...
                                  I volunteer my Aussie! You can bathe him, brush out his undercoat, groom him and I won't even charge for his services

                                  ETA: Ah too bad....I just realized you are on the Left Coast....Boo.
                                  "My biggest fear is that when I die my husband is going to try to sell all my horses and tack for what I told him they cost."

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by PRS View Post
                                    I volunteer my Aussie! You can bathe him, brush out his undercoat, groom him and I won't even charge for his services

                                    ETA: Ah too bad....I just realized you are on the Left Coast....Boo.



                                    Send me a plane ticket - we'll call it even!



                                    Yes, this will have to be enjoyable for her as I have lots of "help" from my almost 3 year-old daughter... Slowly but surely, and certainly, divide and conquer.

                                    Now I can't wait to be done with office work to get out and brush her!

                                    Here's a few more pics of the beast so you can see her coat. Just in case you had pictured it differently!
                                    She's pretty! I am certain she's rough collie mix after seeing these photos.
                                    Don't tell me about what you can't do. That's boring. Show me what you can do. - Mom

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      My parents are Maltese people and they always use a leave in conditioner on their dogs. I think it's Miracle Coat. It really seems to cut down on the mats and it makes brushing easier. These dogs have full show coats too so it's lots of hair on a little dog.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by WarDance View Post
                                        My parents are Maltese people and they always use a leave in conditioner on their dogs. I think it's Miracle Coat. It really seems to cut down on the mats and it makes brushing easier. These dogs have full show coats too so it's lots of hair on a little dog.
                                        If the Miracle Coat is used to put your folks' Maltese "in oil" it must be used very lightly on a double-coated breed, or the coat *will* let go. There's a bit of difference in the care of a jacketed breed vs a drop-coated dog, such as a Maltese.
                                        Don't tell me about what you can't do. That's boring. Show me what you can do. - Mom

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