• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Grooming for a rough coated collie?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Grooming for a rough coated collie?

    So, I've been communicating with English Shepherd and collie rescue, looking for a family farm dog. When talking to the collie folk, I put on my application that I was looking for a smooth coat.

    The collie folk called this morning, and they feel they have a strong candidate for us, but it's a rough coated collie. Obviously, personality/compatibilty is most important, but I am concerned about the grooming aspect.

    Anyone here have experience with how much it takes? Daily? Weekly? Special tools required? I grew up with Samoyeds, which were certainly high on the grooming needs list, but as an adult I've had mainly Dobermans and beagle mixes, so have gotten used to minimal grooming.

    TIA
    Phoenix Farm ~ Breeding-Training-Sales
    Eventing, Dressage, Young Horses
    www.phoenixsporthorses.com
    Check out my new blog: http://califcountrymom.blogspot.com

  • #2
    we had them growing up....one of those few desperate want breeds of mine is a smooth coated collie, no idea why (we only ever had roughs).

    The rough coats are wonderful but the coat is intense to maintain. They are one of those breeds (Newfies and Berners are others that come to mind) that can have that dull, poof, frayed look when the hair is shaved as opposed to maintained through proper grooming so look at that as a last step (unless you're in a climate where it is in the best interest of the dog.)

    They need frequent, rigorous brushings (when I was grooming as a junior in my minor dabblings in the show ring, the theory was always to brush a long coat when wet, now it seems the opposite is true so I can't offer sound advice there.) I would deeefinitely invest in a furminator. You'll have to really part that fur and get right down to the skin. And there will always be areas that will seemingly grow mats--under the ears, backs of the legs, between the paw pads, that skin on the 'stifle' area outside the inguinal area....you'll just have to be dilligent and watch for.

    Personally I think they're one of the most beautiful, eyecatching dogs when cared for properly. But skip a few steps, a few brushings and let the mats go and wowza does it show.

    Good luck with your new babe if and when it finds its way home!

    Comment


    • #3
      i got a smooth coat rescue for that very reason.......i would love the gorgeous locks, but NOT the grooming........she is fantastic, and no maintenence............
      good luck..............and, the tri-county collie rescue in kentucky has smooth coats...........maybe you could get a transport going, or the pilots for paws to fly one to you!

      good luck, they are wonderful dogs

      Comment


      • #4
        I had a rough coat collie for years and I kept him clipped. Clipped him with an Oster A-5 and never had any issues. I would clip him in early fall and let it grow out for the winter, but my dogs are never outside for extended hours of time. He never had the greatest coat to begin with and clipping him made him much easier to bathe and keep clean. If his coat was longer, I brushed him on a regular basis to keep the knots out.

        Collies are great dogs, regardless of their coat length!
        "You can't fix stupid"- Ron White

        Comment


        • #5
          You just need the right tools. I would send the dog to the groomer first for a thorough grooming so you can start off on the right foot.

          Tools to NEVER use, a furminator or a slicker brush...they spit the coat. You have to get the undercoat out. The best way to do this is to spend an hour or two once a month with a grooming comb. Go over section by section against the coat, holding the hair so it doesn't pull. Then, depending on how full a coat your dog has, once a week thorough brushing with an undercoat rake and a brush might do it. In the summer I do a quick once over once a day...just to brush off surface dust and hair. I do mean quick, maybe a minute or so.

          Make sure you have a mat cutter and Show Sheen is your friend. Their hair seems to repel dirt too. The feathers on the hind legs should be trimmed below the fetlock. Pay special attention to their "armpits", between the hind legs and around the ears for mats. Do not cut off the white tip on the tail.

          I spend way less time with my current, thinner coated collie, than I did with my previous full coated girl, but my current girl was starved when she came into the rescue and her coat is really starting to fill out now. My old girl was trained to lie down for grooming, new one is smaller and takes less time, so she stands. When I lived in Maryland, my collie went to the groomer 4 times a year, while I did the regular maintenance work. I brushed out the undercoat first to save myself $100. I haven't found a decent large dog groomer here, so I do it all myself...and save a bundle of money.

          My lab sheds more than the collie, BTW. Collies rule!

          Comment


          • #6
            Long ago we had two shelties.
            Same hair as rough collies, but only 1/4th of it.

            Their hair seemed to stay very clean, mud and grass just fell thru, but we groomed carefully, on a towel on the bathroom counter, turning the hair backwards a handful at the time so as to get to the skin.
            Dogs seemed to enjoy it and go to sleep, didn't like so much trying to brush the very fine hair behind ears and in armpits, that would make small felt like mats in a day, if you didn't watch for that.

            The more serious problem we had with shelties, they were the only dogs we have had that were flea magnets.
            All dogs would run thru the cattle pens and pastures, by rodent and rabbit dens and not get a flea. We had a longer haired saint bernard, a norwegian elkhound, an aussie and a dobie, along with a sheltie and several small poodles.
            All ran around on walks, shelties the only ones to come back with fleas.
            You had to keep them away from those places, or they would need dipping.

            For many years, our vet raised and was showing both, rough and later smooths too and he used to say smooths would shed much more than roughs and both required about the same grooming time for shows.
            He had lovely dogs, collies are some of the nicer family dogs around.
            He has greyhounds now, no more hair.

            Comment


            • #7
              Depends on the individual dog. We had a Collie that had a long, silky type coat, it wasn't thick and it was very easy to care for.

              Other Collies have a very thick, heavy coat that would take longer to brush because you have to make sure you get through it and down to the skin.

              I would meet the dog and see what kind of coat he/she has.

              Push come to shove, it you love the dog, adopt it and after a while decide the coat is too much for you, you always have the option to shave it down like cutter99.

              But really, a through brushing once a week would be fine, unless you have burrs that the dog gets into.

              Good luck! Collies are great dogs, although they are big BARKERS!
              Proud Native Texan!
              owned by 3 Cardigan Corgi's + 3 wonderful horses!

              Comment


              • #8
                I brushed our rough coated collie every day, and gave him an "8 in 1 Pervinal Vitamin" every day as well. Got rid of the dry skin and kept his coat in soft, smooth and shiny condition. The blood work from the vet would always come back fabulous as well. That dog looked fantastic with that combination, and the vet was quite pleased!

                Also second the professional groomer. Get the works. Once or twice a year will give you tip-top results!
                "The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has its limits." Albert Einstein

                http://s1098.photobucket.com/albums/...2011%20Photos/

                Comment


                • #9
                  All our dogs used to get Linatone thru the winters, to keep their skin less dry.
                  We thought it helped, but in reality, don't know ...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Great advice here

                    I've had two rough collies--they are my favorite breed---just incredible, wonderful dogs. And gorgeous to boot. Obviously they need more grooming than a smooth coat, however I have found that they shed much LESS than some of the shorter-haired breeds. I currently have a rescue mixed breed medium-coat aussie, border collie, lab, etc. mix who sheds more than my collies, golden, and english setter ever did!

                    That said, like others posted, rough collies do tend to get knots behind their ears, under their front elbows, and on their rear "panties." But if you keep up with the grooming (LaurieKY had some great suggestions), you can keep on top of it.

                    And skin supplements are a great idea as well. Also, I did take my boys to a professional groomer several times a year. But I learned to do a lot of the grooming myself-- I had both my collies trained to jump in the tub willingly(but as I got older, my back couldn't take the effort as well, so I let the professionals take over that job.

                    I adore rough collies. I say go for it!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I have 2 shelties - I do all their grooming myself. I use pantene people shampoo when I bath them (a few times a year), then I brush them with a wire slicker a few times a week. The older one loves it, he turns into a rubber dog and melts ... the younger one, not so much. But he has gotten a lot better with time, patience, lots of praise, and snacks. And it does help when you do a little section at a time, and get down to the skin.

                      They are more maitenance than a short hair dog, but to me their personalities more than make up for that.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        My sister has always had rough collies and she spends half an hour a day brushing. They are beautiful but she works at it.
                        I realize that I'm generalizing here, but as is often the case when I generalize, I don't care. ~ Dave Barry

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by LauraKY View Post
                          You just need the right tools. I would send the dog to the groomer first for a thorough grooming so you can start off on the right foot.

                          Tools to NEVER use, a furminator or a slicker brush...they spit the coat. You have to get the undercoat out. The best way to do this is to spend an hour or two once a month with a grooming comb. Go over section by section against the coat, holding the hair so it doesn't pull. Then, depending on how full a coat your dog has, once a week thorough brushing with an undercoat rake and a brush might do it. In the summer I do a quick once over once a day...just to brush off surface dust and hair. I do mean quick, maybe a minute or so.

                          Make sure you have a mat cutter and Show Sheen is your friend. Their hair seems to repel dirt too. The feathers on the hind legs should be trimmed below the fetlock. Pay special attention to their "armpits", between the hind legs and around the ears for mats. Do not cut off the white tip on the tail.

                          I spend way less time with my current, thinner coated collie, than I did with my previous full coated girl, but my current girl was starved when she came into the rescue and her coat is really starting to fill out now. My old girl was trained to lie down for grooming, new one is smaller and takes less time, so she stands. When I lived in Maryland, my collie went to the groomer 4 times a year, while I did the regular maintenance work. I brushed out the undercoat first to save myself $100. I haven't found a decent large dog groomer here, so I do it all myself...and save a bundle of money.

                          My lab sheds more than the collie, BTW. Collies rule!
                          LauraKY knows of what she speaks. We had a rough collie growing up, and Grammaw used to brush him religiously once a week-back in the 60's, so I dont know what tool she used. But! THEY ARE WELL WORTH THE EFFORT!!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by LauraKY View Post
                            You just need the right tools. I would send the dog to the groomer first for a thorough grooming so you can start off on the right foot.
                            ***
                            My lab sheds more than the collie, BTW. Collies rule!
                            Ah, the right tools! I seem to have come to the right place for advice. My rescue Collie has oddly-shaped nails; some are normal looking but others appear to be, for want of a better word, twisted, as though he had caught his front paws in something and damaged the nail matrix when he tore loose. His paws were in terrible shape when he arrived - very torn up. I tried taking him to a local groomer who blanched and said "I don't DO Collies." He's a sweetheart and very easy to brush, comb, etc., but I don't know what to do for those weird nails, which are not just weirdly shaped but the approximate consistency of concrete. I do get them trimmed but he's never happy about the process. Does anyone have a brand of clippers to recommend? I know they should be the pliers type, but the ones I have are clearly not all that good. I don't want him to dread having his nails clipped.

                            Brands, sizes, techniques... I'm open to any and all suggestions! And if anyone has found a dental-cleaning "treat" that works really well, I'd love to know about it. He's the sweetest dog ever and deserves the best home ever, so... tidy toes and clean teeth are high on my list, now that the heartworms are gone.

                            All advice and recommendations will be received with gratitude.
                            Home page: www.jessicajahiel.com
                            Horse-Sense newsletter: www.horse-sense.org

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Pasde2 View Post
                              Ah, the right tools! I seem to have come to the right place for advice. My rescue Collie has oddly-shaped nails; some are normal looking but others appear to be, for want of a better word, twisted, as though he had caught his front paws in something and damaged the nail matrix when he tore loose. His paws were in terrible shape when he arrived - very torn up. I tried taking him to a local groomer who blanched and said "I don't DO Collies." He's a sweetheart and very easy to brush, comb, etc., but I don't know what to do for those weird nails, which are not just weirdly shaped but the approximate consistency of concrete. I do get them trimmed but he's never happy about the process. Does anyone have a brand of clippers to recommend? I know they should be the pliers type, but the ones I have are clearly not all that good. I don't want him to dread having his nails clipped.

                              Brands, sizes, techniques... I'm open to any and all suggestions! And if anyone has found a dental-cleaning "treat" that works really well, I'd love to know about it. He's the sweetest dog ever and deserves the best home ever, so... tidy toes and clean teeth are high on my list, now that the heartworms are gone.

                              All advice and recommendations will be received with gratitude.
                              I groom professionally, these are the nail clippers I like the best.
                              http://www.petedge.com/catalog/produ...roductId=43485

                              However, my favorite way to do nails is with a Dremmel tool. I have just the cheap $20 one from Wal-Mart with rough grit sandpaper on it, but that's my favorite way to do nails. You can get them shorter and they're smooth if you do it right.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                If I'm grooming a rough coated collie, it takes me a good 3 hours start to finish. Here's how I do it (note, professional groomer, but I groom pets, not show dogs):

                                Start outdoors, this will make a mess (I obviously do this indoors at work...but I don't care how big of a mess I make there...I'd never do this inside my own house). Get a high velocity dryer. They aren't cheap ($250 for the good ones), but they're AWESOME...and you can use them on your horse too. Blast the dog's coat with it while the dog is dry to loosen up all the dead coat. Get as much of the dead hair out as you possibly can.

                                Bathe the dog. Put a conditioner on the dog. My favorite is made by Furminator. It makes the coat awesomely soft. Then I blast the coat out again with the dryer with the conditioner still on it. Do this outside and/or wear a mask. It will make a mess. Rinse the dog. Towel dry with a chamois meant for cars (I like the blue synthetic ones). Spray with Show Sheen. Dry all the way with dryer, brushing with a slicker brush as you go. My slicker brush is very stiff. Once I have any and all tangles out, I follow this up with a Mars comb (http://www.groomersmall.com/coat_kings.htm). My favorite one has 8 teeth. They seem to be the perfect spacing for those thick double coats.

                                To do that big grooming in the salon, I charge a minimum of $100. If I have to do excessive brushing/dematting it only goes up from there. I have several clients who bring their dog once a month and barely touch them in between. They maybe brush with a slicker once a week. It keeps the dogs in good enough shape that I don't have to do much, if any, extra dematting.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by candysgirl View Post
                                  I groom professionally, these are the nail clippers I like the best.
                                  http://www.petedge.com/catalog/produ...roductId=43485

                                  However, my favorite way to do nails is with a Dremmel tool. I have just the cheap $20 one from Wal-Mart with rough grit sandpaper on it, but that's my favorite way to do nails. You can get them shorter and they're smooth if you do it right.
                                  Thanks so much! I'll order the clippers and look into the Dremel tool idea. I have one of those 'as seen on TV' items - a gift from a family member who thought it would be just the thing - but even with the benefit of detailed instructions, I can't seem to get it to make much of a dent (so to speak) in his nails.

                                  Thanks for the details about your grooming procedures, also. This is all "news I can use"!
                                  Home page: www.jessicajahiel.com
                                  Horse-Sense newsletter: www.horse-sense.org

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Candy's girl, I always comb out the undercoat before bathing...but I don't have a high velocity dryer. Then, I comb out again after bathing...on a dry coat. But, I've been told my my collie show friends and breeders to never use a slicker brush on collies because it splits the coat.

                                    Collies rule!

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      The coat is one reason collie mixes are nice! My current collie mix needs frequent brushing and definitely has the undercoat, but you can skip a few days or weeks without sparking a coat crisis. My first dog, a Bearded Collie, would mat if you skipped a day. Really heavy coats. But really beautiful dogs; the thing that would make me hesitate about a Rough isn't the coat, it's the bark. Collie barks can crack steel.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by LauraKY View Post
                                        Candy's girl, I always comb out the undercoat before bathing...but I don't have a high velocity dryer. Then, I comb out again after bathing...on a dry coat. But, I've been told my my collie show friends and breeders to never use a slicker brush on collies because it splits the coat.

                                        Collies rule!
                                        The dryer takes the place of the initial brushing...and is a heck of a lot faster. I only start brushing when the coat is most of the way dry.

                                        I don't doubt that the show collie people know what they're talking about. However, I'm grooming in a high volume salon and I really don't have the time to *not* use a slicker. It is the fastest way to get the bulk of the loosened undercoat out. I'm also not grooming show dogs. I'm grooming pets with owners who merely want them to look nice and be easier to groom/shed less at home. I have a difficult enough time talking people into brushing once in a while with a slicker between grooms, let alone *doing it right* with undercoat rakes and whatnot. I'm going for making my owners' lives easier so they are more likely to prevent the dogs from getting uncomfortable matting. Very few people want to take the time to do it the right way like the show people do.

                                        There are many things I do with pet poodles that I do not do on my personal show poodles because it would damage the hair. However, a pet dog's hair merely needs to be manageable to the owner and comfortable to the pet. It doesn't need to be babied to grow to the epic proportions my show dogs do. Once they finish and quit showing, I shave them down and care a heck of a lot less. I do many things I wouldn't do on the show dogs because its just easier.

                                        I absolutely love collies, but I don't think I could deal with that much shedding in my house! I put my old man Border collie down last year and while I loved him and he was an awesome dog, I doubt I'll ever get something that sheds again.

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X