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Dog breed recommendations?

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  • Dog breed recommendations?

    I'm going to start "dog-hunting" within the next year or so, and am starting to do some research about breeds and reputable breeders. I will admit to not being overly knowledgable about individual breeds and after owning mutts my whole life (who were fabulous!) I'm interested in purchasing a dog that involves no guessing of what the combination might be .

    I'm basically looking for recommendations of breeds (and breeders, if possible) which may you feel may suit my lifestyle. Obviously this is a pretty big commitment and I want to be confident with my decision. While I understand that dogs are individuals and some of the below may not necessarily reflect breeds as a whole, this is what I'm after:

    - Must be friendly. I have a very active social life and I don't want to have to worry about biting. This dog will also be coming to work with me quite often.
    - Must be very obedient. If a hairy situation arises around the horses, I don't want them to ignore me.
    - Similar to the above, must be a smarter-than-average breed
    - Must do okay in (possibly) an apartment environment. I'm a young professional living downtown, and I may not have a yard available. It'll be walks, dog parks, trips to the barn, and visits back home to the country, only. That said, I'm extremely active and am not worried about not providing them with adequate exercise.
    -Must be QUIET! I cannot *stand* dogs who bark and bark and bark at every little thing.

    That's about it! Size doesn't matter, but in general I'm not a huge fan of dogs small enough to fit in your purse...

    As of now, from personal experience only, I'm considering a Standard Poodle or an Australian Shepard (little worried about the herding instinct there, though). I've also read that Greyhounds are great, super sweet apartment dogs, but haven't researched beyond that.

    Looking forward to hearing your thoughts! I'm very excited about this process .
    Last edited by Cataluna; Oct. 23, 2011, 08:23 PM.

  • #2
    I think poodle sounds good.
    Greyhounds have the thing about not being trust worthy off leash - sight hound thing.

    I would also throw Dalmatian in the mix, but with the caveat that they are really smart and need a lot of socializing. generally speaking when things are hairy, you can trust their judgement. (and they shed)

    http://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/sh...d.php?t=323438

    Comment


    • #3
      In the situation you describe and since you don't mind poodles, a standard poodle would be ideal, all the way around, wonderful, can't do any better than that, plus won't shed all over your house, car and clothes.

      Comment


      • #4
        RESCUE MUTTya rolls de dice+takes a chancebut ya saves a LIFE
        GREYHOUND-rescue--GRATEFUL
        poodle
        smooth collie
        rough collie

        Comment


        • #5
          Lots of greyhound rescues will tell you no off leash time ever ever never ever ever, they also aren't a big fan of electric fences (not that that will be an issue). Greyhound pose an extra risk off leash because they can get very far away very quickly, that whole racing dog thing.

          The first dog that came to mind thats obedient, people oriented, and doesn't bark was a boxer.
          Idk if its a breed characteristic or just something I come across but the majority of the boxers that come to our doggie daycare never bark at home, unless it is a very very bark deserving situation. Boxers are also very trainable and obedient but they are very high strung, tons of energy, and I'm not sure how they'd do in the whole horse situation.

          A standard poodle also sounds great, they're fantastic dogs!

          Comment


          • #6
            Had both Greyhounds and Boxers. Greyhounds are just the best, but not so great out of an enclosed space. They can be good, mine was, and I cheated and let her off leash all the time...the rescue people would not approve. Our Boxer is the best and not at all high strung, but she is exercised and taken to the off leash park. She is a really good sleeper, actually, very sharp and willing and attracts a lot of attention when out and about. Very social to people and dogs. A real love and personality the size of Canada.

            But then - a good dog is a good dog from all breeds and sizes. The dog will find you, trust me.
            Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique

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            • #7
              Originally posted by SaveTheOtters View Post
              The first dog that came to mind thats obedient, people oriented, and doesn't bark was a boxer.
              Oh yes, Boxers!!! Lots of energy, but loverley dogs! But they die young dont they?

              Comment


              • #8
                I hope not.
                Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Foxtrot's View Post
                  I hope not.
                  D'oh...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Poodles are the first thing that come to mind. ACD's are high energy and when trained and socialized properly, can be extremely obedient. Training would, of course, take in herding only when requested.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Read the other thread on family friendly dogs for lots of info on Standard Poodles. I know breeders in MA, but not near you.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Miniature (10-15" - not to be confused with a Toy that's under 10") or Standard (over 23") poodle! I live on 7 acres and have a mini. He's 15" tall and is plenty big enough to hang out with me outside around the horses. He's small enough that he's portable and completely non-threatening to pretty much everyone. He's very quiet. The only time he barks is when someone is at the door (he sounds big enough to get someone to back off...until they see him) and even then he only barks a few times. I encourage this because we live in the country and I am home alone a lot, but it wouldn't be hard to discourage any kind of barking. He'll let out the occasional woof when playing, but he's far from noisy. He's small enough to be really portable (he goes to endurance rides, work with me, road trips, etc.), but not so small he'll break if I trip over him.

                        He's incredibly smart and easy to train. He lives to please. He would be very easy to live with in an apartment. He's amused by throwing a toy across the living room a few times, but also loves to run around outside either loose or going for walks. He's only a year old, but has a reliable recall and is great around the horses. He follows along, but stays out from under foot.

                        Friendly? He doesn't know a stranger. Everyone on the entire planet exists for the sole purpose of being his new best friend.

                        I don't know of any standard breeders around, but I know of a bunch of mini breeders. My good friend actually bred my boy. She may know of a standard breeder or three from showing though. I know of a bunch of mini breeders though. Everyone is in and around Indiana, but I'm happy to give you some names if you're interested.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          My mother had an Airedale that was a lovely dog, she was purchased from a show breeder because she did not grow up to be big enough for the show ring.

                          My mother would take her to work with her (she was a college professor), and she was great with all the students. Rarely barked, didn't shed (did need professional grooming), and was non-allergenic.

                          I think it was a plus that my mother bought her at a year old, as the breeder had done all the housebreaking, training, etc. (especially because my mother really does not know much about dog training).

                          Here is some information about the breed:

                          http://www.airedale.org/theairdale.php

                          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Airedale_Terrier
                          There are friends and faces that may be forgotten, but there are horses that never will be. - Andy Adams

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by candysgirl View Post
                            Miniature (10-15" - not to be confused with a Toy that's under 10") or Standard (over 23") poodle! I live on 7 acres and have a mini. He's 15" tall and is plenty big enough to hang out with me outside around the horses. He's small enough that he's portable and completely non-threatening to pretty much everyone. He's very quiet. The only time he barks is when someone is at the door (he sounds big enough to get someone to back off...until they see him) and even then he only barks a few times. I encourage this because we live in the country and I am home alone a lot, but it wouldn't be hard to discourage any kind of barking. He'll let out the occasional woof when playing, but he's far from noisy. He's small enough to be really portable (he goes to endurance rides, work with me, road trips, etc.), but not so small he'll break if I trip over him.

                            He's incredibly smart and easy to train. He lives to please. He would be very easy to live with in an apartment. He's amused by throwing a toy across the living room a few times, but also loves to run around outside either loose or going for walks. He's only a year old, but has a reliable recall and is great around the horses. He follows along, but stays out from under foot.

                            Friendly? He doesn't know a stranger. Everyone on the entire planet exists for the sole purpose of being his new best friend.

                            I don't know of any standard breeders around, but I know of a bunch of mini breeders. My good friend actually bred my boy. She may know of a standard breeder or three from showing though. I know of a bunch of mini breeders though. Everyone is in and around Indiana, but I'm happy to give you some names if you're interested.
                            This.

                            For your situation, a larger mini would be about the perfect dog for you, just as explained there.

                            A friend has one, two of his family have each one, another friend had two they used working cattle, that would jump up and ride behind the saddle.

                            While there may be a bad mini poodle out there, I have seen many and never met one.
                            Not one is a barker, runs off, is suspicious of people, while some may be a bit reserved, that is because they are not a full contact dog like labs are.
                            Mini poodles are polite and don't use people for bowling pins in their exuberance.

                            At least I would start by looking hard at them, then expand to looking at other breeds.
                            My guess is that you will end up back to the mini poodles, or a standard by default if you want more size.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by lovey1121 View Post
                              Oh yes, Boxers!!! Lots of energy, but loverley dogs! But they die young dont they?
                              My boxer lived to 14 1/2...kept her in shape, thin and muscled up. Wonderful dog...went deaf as she got older, but was always game and silly.
                              "Sic Gorgiamus Allos Subjectatos Nunc"

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by Trakehner View Post
                                My boxer lived to 14 1/2...kept her in shape, thin and muscled up. Wonderful dog...went deaf as she got older, but was always game and silly.
                                My understanding is that is not the norm for larger dogs, not just boxers.

                                A friend living in town had a very nice boxer.
                                The only problem, she would jump up and hook her paws on the 6' wooden yard fence and get over it and go roam the neighborhood.
                                His wife was a weaver and worked from home and she would get a call to come get the dog several times a week.
                                They were absolutely crazy over their dog and worried sick it get run over.
                                They finally put some brackets with barbed wire slanted to the inside and they say the dog eyeballed that and never again got out.
                                Smart dog that.
                                The sad part, she died at 7 from a bad heart.
                                The vet told them it was common in larger dogs not to live to 10.
                                Our great dane lived to 10 1/2.

                                That is no reason not to have them, for as long as they are here.
                                It is one more consideration if you are not set on a specific breed.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  I think a lot of the 'don't live long'
                                  stems from back when we did not understand a lot of things (like the nutrition for Dals) or larger dogs are just not as fawned over in many cases (statistics!) as their pocket size counterparts. I have heard from many Dal owners who's dogs lived well past the projected 10 year span to a point where I think mine died young at 14.

                                  I think though that boxers have some issues that shorten their lives (kind of like the cancer prone labs...)


                                  BTW, I find it funny the classification of the sizes: In Germany the knee high poodle is considered 'standard', the larger one is 'King' (no, really, Koenigs Pudel) and the smaller one is the mini.
                                  Happy about that, too, because dogs are not 'toys'

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Please don't rule out "dumb" dogs! "Smarter than average" sounds great, but really, honestly - in a house dog, who basic job description is to be a good companion - smart=trouble! Smart does not equal trainable or well socialized! (I'll take a biddable dog over a "smart" one anyday!) That's not to say that all smart dogs are difficult, but seriously, intelligence in dogs is pretty overrated for most folks.

                                    Those really awesome, super smart Aussies and Border Collies? They NEED jobs. That means that you HAVE to give them one, because you don't want them to get bored and pick their own job (which you probably won't like)!

                                    That said, in my experience, Australian Shepherds are VERY active - smart and busy - I personally wouldn't want to share an apartment with one, unless it came with a good sized yard. Australian Cattle Dogs are great, too - but they can be pretty "one person" dogs who are very serious about protecting their person - not always the super-friendly type with visitors. I've loved the greyhounds that I've met - they might not be the brightest bulbs in the chandelier, but they're super low key and relaxing to be around. They also did OK off leash at the dog park, too - most were more likely to hang around the people than run around with the other dogs. The Boxers I've known were pretty sweet and goofy, but at least one was VERY protective of his people when it came to other dogs - he eventually quit coming to the dog park because of that. Still a great dog, but just not OK with most other dogs.

                                    Since you mentioned taking the dog to the barn, I feel like I have to ask: Is the barn owner/manager OK with you bringing a dog to their barn and letting it wander? Even really smart, really obedient dogs can lose their minds when they see the barn cats dashing around or if something spooks the entire gelding herd into running... And if it's OK to bring a well-behaved dog to the barn, how do they feel about a puppy, who hasn't learned proper barn etiquette yet?

                                    I'd also check out the dog park where you plan to take the beastie for exercise - different parks have very different vibes - do they have a separate small dog area if you end up with a little guy, or do all the dogs share one big space, regardless of size or energy level? My old dog park was nice because it was OK to take a big dog into the small dog area if said big dog was better off hanging with the littles due to age or infirmity - other places might not be as flexible as that. It's worth knowing ahead of time.

                                    I think when you're trying to pick a purebred, it helps to look at general types and think about whether that type of dog would work for you, then start looking at specific breeds.
                                    For example, think about sighthounds vs. scenthounds, terriers vs. spitz types, hunting vs. herding dogs... once you realize that scenthounds may be tough to train because they tend to follow their noses and that they're generally a little on the vocal side, you might rule them out, and start looking at terriers - generally smaller, and mentally pretty tough (you have to be to go after prey that's bigger than you)... before you know it, you'll have found a group or two that really appeal to you (and fit your lifestyle), and then you can start figuring where the different breeds fit into that picture.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Originally posted by Bluey View Post
                                      While there may be a bad mini poodle out there, I have seen many and never met one.
                                      Not one is a barker, runs off, is suspicious of people, while some may be a bit reserved, that is because they are not a full contact dog like labs are.
                                      Mini poodles are polite and don't use people for bowling pins in their exuberance.

                                      At least I would start by looking hard at them, then expand to looking at other breeds.
                                      My guess is that you will end up back to the mini poodles, or a standard by default if you want more size.
                                      Just for testimony to the odd one - my grandparents had one. He was notorious. Suspicious, snappish, actually bit (drawing blood) more than one member of the family. A true Jekyll and Hyde dog, only his Jekyll was ignoring people, still not being friendly. He once bit (drawing blood) my grandmother, one of his two favorite people, for kissing my grandfather good night.

                                      I knew that dog closely, almost daily, for years. Nobody in the whole neighborhood liked him. Even my grandparents admitted his problems, and they'd had him from puppyhood. He was bred by the neighbor across the street, and none of his siblings were like that. No holes in the history, no past abuse. That dog was just a sullen, bad temperament, like the bad apple person who turns up occasionally from good parents who did their best to raise them right. Rare but happens. The neighbor across the street had said many times he would take the dog back and euth him and replace with another. Grandmother couldn't abide the thought.

                                      Because of that dog, the whole family was soured on poodles. My SIL and brother have recently gotten into standard poodles, and theirs are neat, but I was a little suspicious at first. I don't think I'd ever have a mini poodle. It may be rare, but when you saw the rare one every day for years and felt his teeth, it still turns you off on the whole breed.

                                      I realize he was a bad individual and would have been a bad Lab or anything. Just throwing it in for full breed pool experience sampling along with all the "never met a bad ones." Whatever you get, if the breeder himself says this one has a screw loose, believe him instead of getting sorry for the poor little doggy.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        ALL purebred dogs have breed rescue. You can also find purebred dogs for adoption on www.petfinder.com

                                        There is really no reason to purchase a puppy unless:

                                        1. You wish to show the dog in conformation
                                        2. You wish to breed the dog
                                        3. You are a glutton for punishment and are insistent on raising a puppy!

                                        Go to the Canadian Kennel Club website: http://www.ckc.ca/en/ and research breeds. Then contact the local breed club for any breeds that catch your eye. Talk to breeders about their breed, find out the pros/cons. Go to some shows and meet the breeds you may be interested in so you can get a feel for their size, hair coat, temperament, grooming requirements, etc.

                                        Once you've narrowed down what breed you want, contact that breeds rescue and adopt the purebred dog of your dreams.

                                        The problem with asking folks on a forum like this for breed recommendations is that everyone is going to tell you about THEIR favorite breed. They might have had one or two Boxers that were great, but in reality haven't met hundreds of Boxers to get a more balanced feel for what the breed is really all about.

                                        Talk to dog trainers, veterinarians, groomers and people in breed rescue to truly get a feel for a breed. People in professions where they care for, and handle dogs on a daily basis see not only the excellent specimens of a breed, but also the mediocre and downright horrible ones as well.

                                        Someone who says, "I had a (fill in any breed) for 14 years and it was the best dog ever", isn't really giving you a well rounded feel for the breed. All they can do is tell you what their dog was like and what they were willing to put up with in terms of behavior, health and grooming.

                                        What one person LOVES in a dog, another may hate. That's why you need to visit the breeds in person and see what YOU think.

                                        One persons 'smart' dog is 'dumb' so someone else. One persons 'hyper' dog has a totally normal activity level to the next person.

                                        You get the idea.
                                        Proud Native Texan!
                                        owned by 3 Cardigan Corgi's + 3 wonderful horses!

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