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Where to look? Young or adult dogs needing new homes? **Update. We got one!**

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  • #41
    Not wanting to pay a 300$ adoption fee is not the same as not being able to afford vet care. When we were shopping for a new cat (after spending years and $$$ in vet care for our elderly kitties health problems) I did not want to spend 150+$ for an adult rescue cat. Nor was I willing to allow someone to call every known acquaintance, present 2 notarized documents from people living outside our home stating they would care for the cats in case me and my husband died, or let the rescue keep ownership of the cat forever. I do understand why rescues require all that, but I am unwilling to go through that.

    I did what BDJ suggests in this thread and adopted an adult cat (had been sold as a kitten and returned) from his breeder. Came neutered, with shots, known purebred, I know for sure his age, and after a couple interviews the breeder just wanted 50$.

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    • #42
      Check out PAWS FOR LIFE. My last dog came from them!

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      • #43
        Y'all should settle down. Any dog would be lucky to get xctrygirl as an owner. (I know her through a mutual friend, and she is a fine animal person.) And also, as usual, learn to read! She didn't say she couldn't AFFORD to pay $300, she said she didn't want to, for a mutt.

        I picked up my last 2 cats off the street for free. Nice thing about cats.
        I tolerate all kinds of animal idiosyncrasies.
        I've found that I don't tolerate people idiosyncrasies as well. - Casey09

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        • #44
          Originally posted by lcw579 View Post
          OT - but wow! I love my vet who removed tumors from my rats for $50 because he didn't think he should charge more than that for an animal that was sold as a "feeder".

          Carry on.
          Haha, well, my vet is usually pretty good since my rats have been such frequent patients! After having one with pneumonia who had to be in and out for check ups all the time, I got a little stingy with the chest x-rays...

          I just told the vet, if it sounds bad when you listen to his lungs, let's assume the worst and give him the meds for it because I do not want to pay for more teeny tiny chest x-rays. He a lot of times now just does stuff and doesn't charge me for it = )

          I also had a nebulizer on loan from them for about 4 months for my pneumonia rat.

          Overall, my vet has been super good to us, but the $300 vet bill did happen(2 rats, both with suspected respiratory issues, one was just a little bad, one was really bad, it gets spendy...)

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          • #45
            OP, you just posted:

            Originally posted by Xctrygirl View Post
            I am only saying that I, like a lot of my friends, believe that if you need to get rid of an animal yourself, you should be looking for the best home for them. Not the best home for them that can also pay you a re-homing fee of multiple hundreds of dollars on an animal that isn't working for you. If you took the risk and it didn't pan out, then why is the new owner responsible for paying you back? (Individual homes only... Rescues not included in this sentiment. My comments are based off the "re-homing" fees found on Craigslist and one rescue I saw that seemed a little off, and it seemed not to be a real rescue.. but more like the one described early. Shady woman etc)
            But what you said in your original post was:

            Originally posted by Xctrygirl View Post
            What bothers me is that there seems not to be a basic site where owners can get rid of their dogs without a potential new owner having to spend in excess of $200. I get that rescues need to cover their expenses. I am a bt shocked to see fees of over $300 in some places for a mutt. I can do math and having cared for my dogs I know what vaccines and spay/neutering cost. So I am kindof wondering what those "rescues" are doing with 50+ animals at $300 a pop!
            ~Emily
            Sure looks like you included rescues in the sentiment to me! Maybe you ought to edit your original post. I don't know of any small animal rescues that waste their $300 a pop. In most cases, $300 doesn't begin to cover their expenses.

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            • #46
              Originally posted by lewin View Post
              Not wanting to pay a 300$ adoption fee is not the same as not being able to afford vet care. When we were shopping for a new cat (after spending years and $$$ in vet care for our elderly kitties health problems) I did not want to spend 150+$ for an adult rescue cat. Nor was I willing to allow someone to call every known acquaintance, present 2 notarized documents from people living outside our home stating they would care for the cats in case me and my husband died, or let the rescue keep ownership of the cat forever. I do understand why rescues require all that, but I am unwilling to go through that.

              I did what BDJ suggests in this thread and adopted an adult cat (had been sold as a kitten and returned) from his breeder. Came neutered, with shots, known purebred, I know for sure his age, and after a couple interviews the breeder just wanted 50$.
              That is totally fair. I got my fat cat from a friend's soybean field, and I got my other cat from the SPCA for $65 I believe.

              I needed to KNOW what I was getting with a dog, so I paid more to get a superior service.

              You can usually go to an SPCA-esque shelter and pay $75 for a dog. Or you can peruse craigslist or petfinder to your heart's content. I have not ever been to a pound that is basically just a holding place for strays (no vet work), but I suppose that could be an option too if there is one near you. Our vets also have a cat or dog up for adoption from time to time.

              My only point for the OP was that there is often good reason for rescues or individuals charging what seem like high fees for their dogs. $300 is a little high, but I've seen many reputable rescues that charge that much and are still losing money on the dog after that fee.

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              • #47
                We just donated $300 for our collie. Her vet work alone was more than $300. The rescue had her for 6 months. Add in heartworm meds and frontline and you're close to $400.

                I could have adopted a mutt from the Humane Society, all shots, neuter/spay and chipped for about $100. I have one mutt already (dumped here) and a beautiful yellow lab (dumped here as well). I wanted a collie, and I wanted a rescue, so I went to a breed rescue.

                There are lots of options, but you have no reason to slam rescues, especially breed rescues, for charging $300+, unless it's intentionally such a high amount (and they have such ridiculous rules) that it keeps everyone from adopting. In that case, they are hoarders, not rescues.

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                • #48
                  I needed to KNOW what I was getting with a dog, so I paid more to get a superior service.

                  You can usually go to an SPCA-esque shelter and pay $75 for a dog. Or you can peruse craigslist or petfinder to your heart's content. I have not ever been to a pound that is basically just a holding place for strays (no vet work), but I suppose that could be an option too if there is one near you. Our vets also have a cat or dog up for adoption from time to time.

                  My only point for the OP was that there is often good reason for rescues or individuals charging what seem like high fees for their dogs. $300 is a little high, but I've seen many reputable rescues that charge that much and are still losing money on the dog after that fee.
                  you get what you pay for. If you really want to know what you are getting, you pay $$ to get a well-bred dog from a breeder. If you would like to get a dog that is a known quantity, you pay $300 to a rescue that has evaluated and fostered the dog for several months and is familiar with it. If you just want pot-luck you try the SPCA or craigslist. End up with an unhealthy, behaviorally disturbed dog, yes, very possible when going the el cheapo route.

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                  • #49
                    Durn, I want to know how rescues get $300 and up a pop! I have fosters now I have sunk $500 and up into and will be lucky to get $100 when they finally get adopted.....

                    Course the good news is that for your adoption fee the dog is FULLY vetted and evaluated so really its a bargain ....

                    Oh wait. For those that know me IRL DON'T tell Mr CM! Shhhh.... he doesn't get to know the prices

                    OP, we adopt out of state, and we've got a large variety of mixed young adults needing good homes! PM if you want a link to our group on Petfinder.....
                    HaHA! Made-est Thou Look!

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                    • #50
                      A good source is just word of mouth also. If you know what type of dog you want (indoor, toy, couch potato, under a certain size, etc) and you tell your friends and acquaintances you'll probably get offered a bunch of suitable and (mostly) unsuitable candidates. Many people going through difficult times try to rehome and would rather not involve a shelter, or when the breed rescues are full there a good dogs to be found as a result of a move, divorce, child developing an allergy or other good reason. Sometimes you find the best dogs when you least expect it.
                      You can't fix stupid-Ron White

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                      • #51
                        Originally posted by wendy View Post
                        you get what you pay for. If you really want to know what you are getting, you pay $$ to get a well-bred dog from a breeder. If you would like to get a dog that is a known quantity, you pay $300 to a rescue that has evaluated and fostered the dog for several months and is familiar with it. If you just want pot-luck you try the SPCA or craigslist. End up with an unhealthy, behaviorally disturbed dog, yes, very possible when going the el cheapo route.
                        Wow.

                        1.) You can also pay $$ for a very poorly bred dog from a backyard breeder.
                        2.) All SPCA's are independent. Some great, some poor. My SPCA does a ton of testing on their pets, doesn't have time limits, and knows the animals very well to make a good match (and it's open admission, too). Our local rescue group doesn't do any temperament testing. Sorry you apparently have a not so nice shelter near you apparently, but don't paint them all with one brush.

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                        • #52
                          Gee, I thought a purebred dog was the most reliable way to end up with genetic problems like hip dysplasia. What a load of nonsense. You can get sensible healthy dogs that are mutts or purebred, honestly.

                          Funny how no one tries to tell us crazy cat ladies that only purebred cats have nice temperaments and are healthy. They'd get laughed out of the room, since most folks own mutt cats.
                          I tolerate all kinds of animal idiosyncrasies.
                          I've found that I don't tolerate people idiosyncrasies as well. - Casey09

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                          • #53
                            Shhhhh! Don't let my cats hear you calling them mutts!

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                            • #54
                              Gee, I thought a purebred dog was the most reliable way to end up with genetic problems like hip dysplasia.
                              no, actually the "mutt" population that has been tested has quite a high rate of hip dysplasia- 20% or so are affected, which is much higher than in many pure breeds.
                              A GOOD breeder of purebreds extensively tests their breeding stock for things like hip dysplasia and doesn't breed affected/carrier dogs and is your best source for a genetically healthy dog.
                              I wouldn't take a dog from one of our local shelters anymore- since spay/neuter/fences are quite popular in this area, the primary source of dogs that end up in the shelters are the puppy mills and the backyard breeders- a dog population known to be burdened with genetic problems. The last dog I took from a local shelter (mutt) turned out to have hip dysplasia, bad knees, allergies, and a rare inherited cancer- a walking nightmare of genetic problems. She was sweet though.
                              My latest mutt I made sure she came from down south, where they aren't fond of spay/neuter/fences, so the mutt population is sort of free-breeding and more likely to free of genetic diseases.

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                              • #55
                                Originally posted by BLBGP View Post
                                Wow.

                                1.) You can also pay $$ for a very poorly bred dog from a backyard breeder.
                                2.) All SPCA's are independent. Some great, some poor. My SPCA does a ton of testing on their pets, doesn't have time limits, and knows the animals very well to make a good match (and it's open admission, too). Our local rescue group doesn't do any temperament testing. Sorry you apparently have a not so nice shelter near you apparently, but don't paint them all with one brush.
                                I definitely see your point, but wendy's was a reasonable generalization.

                                Mutts can be wonderful. My friend has gotten both of her mutts from not so great shelter situations, and they are perfect. No health problems as of yet, and she got them as young puppies, so they didn't come with much baggage. They are also both beautiful and are just great dogs. I know many other success stories like this. She also had a lot more time and experience to devote to the equation than a lot of people who adopt from that type of setting.

                                A lot of typical "shelters" just don't have the funding to do as much preliminary work with the dog. Our local SPCA is actually quite good as far as working with the dogs, though I know they aren't as selective as some when it comes to placement (which is a big part of the equation).

                                Purebred rescues or smaller no-kill shelters are sometimes a better bet if you want a dog that has been fostered and has a longer known-history behind him. Yes, some are just as bad as pounds (it's easy to call yourself a "rescue"), but it's reasonable to generalize that many are a safer bet for first time owners who need a little more support (as always, RESEARCH is key!)

                                As for purebreds from a breeder, I doubt wendy was encouraging people to go get a purebred from a BYB. I would much rather take a shot with a pound dog than get into that mess.

                                If you do your research, you pick a breed type that suits you as well as a breed with limited health problems. On top of that, you research heavily and work with an exceptional breeder. You still don't know what you're getting 100% since it's a puppy, but you have a good idea. Yes, if you go out and buy a show-type GSD (versus one from working lines), you are likely to run into a lot more health issues than with many mutts. For that reason, there are some purebreds that I would never seek out even from really great breeders.

                                There are always exceptions to the rule, and most of the people on COTH are NOT typical animal owners. I think this tends to be a much more responsible animal group, so many on here are fully equipped to handle a dog with more unknowns in its background = ) The rest of the population, however... Eek!

                                Comment


                                • #56
                                  Well, there's fees and then there's fees. One "shelter" I looked at on Petfinder wanted $600 for Cavalier King Charles pups. Sorry, at that point I'm just going to a breeder and getting ones with papers and a history.

                                  If they come spayed/neutered and up to date on shots, $200 is a bargain. If that's "as-is" whatever condition the dog came in as, then I'd find it excessive. At that point go to the shelter (around here it's $50 for a dog minus a $25 rebate when you send them proof the dog's been neutered.)
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                                  • #57
                                    one thing that gets missed

                                    And I think needs to be mentioned... locally to ME at least the low cost spay/neuter clinics don't use the same pain medicine "protocol" as our rescue's vet. Since we're discussing costs, if the pet isn't already speutered when you are approved please talk about pain protocol meds with the shelter/rescue. Cheaper rates typically don't have the follow up nor the extra medication.

                                    Older males have significantly more blood flow in the genital area which complicates their surgery and females about to go into heat can have their uterine tissue tear and have excessive bleeding if they are being spayed.

                                    In addition, the thinking that a vet who ONLY spay/neuters at a low cost clinic is more experienced and capable can be quite false. A nearby county recently had to deal with an excessive (1-2 per day) death/injury rate for spays from one of their vets (who thankfully is now let go from that facility!).

                                    Again, if your chosen rescue group uses a "normal" vet instead of the local low cost clinic you may find they have good reason! Its not always about the cost but more likely the outcome.....
                                    HaHA! Made-est Thou Look!

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                                    • #58
                                      Originally posted by Guin View Post
                                      When I was looking for a dog that was "golden retriever-ish" I had a choice. I could pay $1000 for a purebred puppy, or I could pay $250 for a "golden retriever and something else" at the animal shelter. He's 11 now, and my "inexpensive" dog has cost me thousands of dollars in regular vet care, food, and general maintenance over the years.

                                      $300 for a nice adoptable dog is a drop in the bucket, especiallly if they come neutered and hw tested. If you can't afford a $300 adoption fee, how are you going to afford taking care of the animal for 10 or 12 years?
                                      THIS and THIS AGAIN.

                                      And I can tell you that any legitimate Rescue organization will raise a red flag when they hear that kind of attitude.
                                      ~Kryswyn~ Always look on the bright side of life, de doo, de doo de doo de doo
                                      Check out my Kryswyn JRTs on Facebook

                                      "Life is merrier with a terrier!"

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                                      • #59
                                        Come on people, learn to read.

                                        OP described in detail the time and $$ she has put into the care of the dogs she already has. She is emphatically not one of those owners who won't spend money for vet care for her critters. She is just saying, "Gee, aren't there better deals to be had for a decent homeless dog out there?"

                                        This question is not criminal or treasonous. Just because she would rather not pay more upfront than seems reasonable, doesn't make her a bad person or a bad owner. If you are happy to pay, you go right ahead and do it. It does seem a little perverse to me that in a world where we are euthanizing 10s of thousands of dogs a year, dogs are still hundreds of dollars a pop. I hear you about the screening and care and shots and in some cases surgery, but settle down, will ya?
                                        I tolerate all kinds of animal idiosyncrasies.
                                        I've found that I don't tolerate people idiosyncrasies as well. - Casey09

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                                        • #60
                                          I just read the OP, then skipped to the end...

                                          There are people out there who are actually looking for a big dog?
                                          Adult at that?!



                                          I have not checked my local shelter, I am not in the market for a dog. But the place is full and I don't think the fee is in the triple digets.

                                          But I do have to echo the sentiment that the adoption fees some people ask for a pretty high.

                                          But then again, vet fees to vary from region to region...my old vet charged around 60 bucks, a bit more for females, a little less for males...the new vet asks 120...add in shots and such, you reach the 200 mark quick like (and I think my vet is cheap, still)


                                          maybe the op needs to take a drive through the country...there might be a farm or 2 willing to part with one of their 35 dogs!
                                          Originally posted by BigMama1
                                          Facts don't have versions. If they do, they are opinions
                                          GNU Terry Prachett

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