• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Heart Worm Treatments for Senior Dogs

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Heart Worm Treatments for Senior Dogs

    Hey guys,

    I posted a few weeks ago about the Doxies I rescue and foster and since then have picked up a few more. Surprise! Roxy and Roscoe were listed on Craigslist by their owner who wanted $50 for them before she dumped them at the shelter because "her son was allergic". I of course offered to take them that very minute (no payment of course) and she turned me down. Flash forward one week and I see a post about a Doxie pair that a woman found tied behind a thrift store (Oh rural South Carolina, how I do love thee!) The guy who owned the store said he'd picked them up a week ago and was taking them to the pound because they were chasing his cats. Really!?! Those small hunting hounds were chasing your cats? Imagine! Anyway, nice Craigslist lady took them home with her and was feeding them and loving on them but had just found out she was suffering from a degenerative bone disease and needed extensive surgery. She wanted someone to take them so I went to pick them up. Both were decent weight. Roxy is spayed but poor Roscoe is intact and heart worm positive

    The vet I use regularly is a great old -fashioned no-nonsense kind of guy and I love him dearly, but he wanted to treat little Roscoe's heart worms the same way he does all the younger dogs. We always do the three separate treatment route over 4 months and I've seen how hard it is even the youngest and strongest dogs. Roxy and Roscoe have to be at least 12, maybe older. They are both black and tans but all of their tan is white now.

    Basically, I'm just scared that the treatment will kill my sweet old man. I have appointment with a specialist next week to really look into the condition of his heart and talk about options but I thought here would be a good place to start.

    What treatments have you used for senior dogs with heartworms? What were the results?
    Amber King
    Furever Dachshund Rescue
    Fundraising Chair
    http://www.fureverdachshundrescue.org/

  • #2
    I"ll be honest one of our rescue / dumped farm dogs was 10+ and tested positive for HW's and the vet took chest x-rays to make sure his heart was not enlarged and advised us that the treatment might be very hard on him. To instead treat him with Ivermectin each month and forgo the other treatment. Retest at 6 months and a year. At a year out he tested negative and lived to be 14 with no outward signs of heart disease from his situation.
    "I would not beleive her if her tongue came notorized"

    Comment


    • #3
      I'm a rural South Carolinian, but I'll try real hard to make myself understood

      Don't you dare put those poor old dogs through immiticide!

      Do the slow kill method. Prophylactic dose of ivermectin religiously every month. Maybe doxycyclin. If your vet won't cooperate, seek a second or third opinion.

      I had a 94 year old cousin pass away recently. You know what killed her? Complications from the anesthetic used for her freakin' colonoscopy. I ask you. There should be a special chamber of hell for vets and doctors who upsell to the detriment of their elderly clients.

      Anyway. We've had HW here for 50 years. It's a poor parasite that kills its host quickly. I hear tell there's some new-fangled theory of evolution that supports this - not that we read science here in rural South Carolina - but anyway. Trust me. HW's aren't going to kill your teenage doxies, but immiticide likely will.
      Last edited by pAin't_Misbehavin'; Jun. 2, 2011, 10:26 PM.
      I'm not ignoring the rules. I'm interpreting the rules. Tamal, The Great British Baking Show

      Comment


      • #4
        http://www.heartwormsociety.org/

        Comment


        • #5
          I'd venture to guess that the majority of other Veterinarians with experience treating older pets for heartworms (we'll assume that these Veterinarians have drawn blood and had X-rays performed to check out the heart and lungs, and they were okay) would say "slow kill method" by using the Ivermectin and Doxycyclin.
          If wishes were horses then beggars would ride...
          DLA: Draft Lovers Anonymous
          Originally posted by talkofthetown
          As in, the majikal butterfly-fahting gypsy vanners.

          Comment


          • #6
            The slow kill method is no longer recommended due to its propensity for leaving only resistant worms behind and leading to transmission of resistant HW to other pets.
            Michael: Seems the people who burned me want me for a job.
            Sam: A job? Does it pay?
            Michael: Nah, it's more of a "we'll kill you if you don't do it" type of thing.
            Sam: Oh. I've never liked those.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Grataan View Post
              The slow kill method is no longer recommended due to its propensity for leaving only resistant worms behind and leading to transmission of resistant HW to other pets.
              Does that mean ivermectin is no longer recommended as a preventative?
              I'm not ignoring the rules. I'm interpreting the rules. Tamal, The Great British Baking Show

              Comment


              • #8
                I'd like to read articles/research supporting the thumbs down to slow kill.

                I would only use slow kill. Did it for one rescue dog and my equine vet (who also had a small animal practice at the time) agreed with me. I just put her on heartgard. She's been Heartworm free for four years now.

                Comment


                • #9
                  http://www.heartwormsociety.org/vete...HW-Disease.pdf

                  page 11

                  Having seen dogs die of heartworms, yes, they can kill a dog. It is a very common scenario for a yard dog who spends a lot of time tied to a tree in the backyard (yes, yes these exist in surprisingly large proportions) to get loose and drop dead because of a parasitic emboli (from the heartworms).

                  Not saying your dog is going to drop dead, but just wanted to squash the notion that heartworms don't kill dogs.

                  I would discuss these options with your vet and your concerns and come up with a plan. Your vet knows the patient, its clinical signs and its radiographic stage and can better make recommendations that are in the best interest of the dog.

                  Comment

                  • Original Poster

                    #10
                    Hey guys,

                    Thanks for all your answers. He has been on Doxycycline since his positive test and will stay on it through the course of the treatment (whichever one that may be). I really do think that ivermectin/doxycycline is the way to go.

                    The Heart Worm Society said this:

                    In cases where arsenicals are contraindicated and the animal’s
                    overall condition makes standard adulticidal therapy impractical,
                    the use of a monthly ivermectin-based heartworm preventive
                    along with doxycycline could be considered. It has been reported that ivermectin and doxycycline administered periodically over
                    36 weeks resulted in a 78% reduction in adult worm numbers.
                    Moreover, microfilariae from dogs treated with doxycycline that
                    were ingested by mosquitoes developed into third-stage larvae
                    that appeared to be normal in appearance and motility, but these larvae were not able to develop into adult worms, thus negating the risk of selecting for resistant strains. The administration of doxycycline at 10 mg/kg BID for a 4 week period every three to four months should eliminate most Wolbachia organisms and not allow them to repopulate.

                    So it looks like it would kill the majority of them fairly quickly, possibly eradicate them in the long-term, and not produce resistant strains. And I do know that heart worms can kill. I am in SC and we end up with about 10% of our dogs coming in with heart worms and we always worry about them dying before they finish the treatment. Most of our adoptions occur up north and my vet is so cheap that all the healthy dogs get transported up the road and its just me and the HW dogs walking slowly and not being allowed to get very excited. I told my vet I wanted a Christmas card from him thanking my rescue for paying off his Lexus.
                    Amber King
                    Furever Dachshund Rescue
                    Fundraising Chair
                    http://www.fureverdachshundrescue.org/

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Grataan View Post
                      and leading to transmission of resistant HW to other pets.
                      How is HW transmitted to other pets when HW is only transmitted by infected mosquito to another animal? The HW Society still recommends "slow kill" for dogs that can't handle Immiticide, etc., but they recommend "fast kill" for every other animal.

                      Also, I don't recal anyone having said HWs don't kill. However, heartworm treatment can also kill. Embolisms can occur during treatment as well. There's a 50/50 chance of a dog making it, but I'll take that chance anyday (in a healthy animal.)
                      If wishes were horses then beggars would ride...
                      DLA: Draft Lovers Anonymous
                      Originally posted by talkofthetown
                      As in, the majikal butterfly-fahting gypsy vanners.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Hydrophile, it was a response to this post (and not meant to be argumentative)

                        Originally posted by pAin't_Misbehavin' View Post
                        Don't you dare put those poor old dogs through immiticide!

                        Do the slow kill method. Prophylactic dose of ivermectin religiously every month. Maybe doxycyclin. If your vet won't cooperate, seek a second or third opinion.

                        I had a 94 year old cousin pass away recently. You know what killed her? Complications from the anesthetic used for her freakin' colonoscopy. I ask you. There should be a special chamber of hell for vets and doctors who upsell to the detriment of their elderly clients.

                        Anyway. We've had HW here for 50 years. It's a poor parasite that kills its host quickly. I hear tell there's some new-fangled theory of evolution that supports this - not that we read science here in rural South Carolina - but anyway. Trust me. HW's aren't going to kill your teenage doxies, but immiticide likely will.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I never said HW don't kill. I said they don't kill quickly. If she goes pouring arsenic into an elderly dog, the HWs aren't what will kill it.
                          I'm not ignoring the rules. I'm interpreting the rules. Tamal, The Great British Baking Show

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I have rescued two elderly bassetts in the past year and a half. One died of some sort of neurological episode. The second one passed of complications of a multitude of things....one being heartworm and the treatment there of....

                            I have had a rescued doxie treated with immiticide...was cruel and unusual punishment....the worst thing I have ever seen. He hated life for two months.

                            My dear elderly basset was seen by the vet and he recommended an alternative to immiticide but different than the "slow" kill method. Needless to say, after we started her on the alternative treament, I would never, ever treat an elderly dog for HW again. I would choose to let the preventative do what it does and enjoy the last days that I have with my dog.

                            Let the dog enjoy what life it has left.....My dear elderly basset had few good days after we started her on her alternative treatment. She had complications from the medications themselves. We could never get her back afterward! It is heartbreaking.

                            Preventative only for my dogs, if I should ever have one test positive again.
                            Life is too short to argue with a mare! Just don't engage! It is much easier that way!

                            Have fun, be safe, and let the mare think it is her idea!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Like I said, not trying to be argumentative. Just clarifying since there are many people who read this BB for advice.

                              Maybe you don't realize that I agree with you, which is why I simply provided material and a page number which the OP was able to use and make a decision off of (which was to not use immiticide).

                              I did not alter your post in any way, simply bolded your statement which said "HWs won't kill your doxies, but immiticide likely will". I'm sure you meant to say the immiticide would kill them faster, but came out otherwise. This was my only disagreement, and just stating the facts.

                              OP, good luck with the doxies, HW's are no fun. Thank you for taking these kids in and trying to do right by them. It's been a really bad HW year this year for us in the deep south!

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Lots of advice here....but I'll give you the best advice

                                Talk with the cardiologist/specialist you are seeing - specialists will give you the most up to date information, based on your dogs test results. Not all geriatric HW+ dogs are treated the same.

                                Good luck and keep us posted....gotta love those weiner dogs!!

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X