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The Flexi Rant Thread

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  • #41
    I HATE THEM!!!!
    People bring dogs into my office on them. No way to control them without holding the dammed button down.
    They run all over the place.
    They tangle themselves up.
    Saw a dog at a horse show last week on a flexileash attack another dog. Owner just stood there and let the dog run out to the end of the flexileash as the other dog tried to leave.

    I HATE THEM!!!!

    Comment


    • #42
      I love my Flexi leads. Like everyone else said, clueless people are everywhere and it really wouldn't matter what they walk their dogs with.

      I use them when running. My thumb always on the break. granted my dogs are well behaved so it is a non issue but I am always aware of others when on Greenway. I get told all the time how well behaved my my dogs are and they are sighthounds so I get a few bonus points for that. lol.
      Proud Member of the Opinionated Redhead Club! RIP my dear Avery ~3/21/1995-9/21/2011~

      Extreme Cat!!! 2006 OTTB
      Magic Cat - Final Demand

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      • #43
        Wow! If people actually heeded the warnings from the company maybe there wouldn't be so many complaints. Cuts, burns, amputations?! Kudos to those 1% that use the product correctly. The other 99%, well, enough said.

        http://www.flexiusa.com/operation/safety-advice.php

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        • #44
          I never, ever used a flexi lead for my dogs in a normal walking environment (vets office, park, neighborhood, etc.) I did find them to be useful when we would take our JRT to the beach. It would allow him more room to run and explore, but not allow him to get loose chasing seagulls, etc. where his normally excellent recall would possibly have been compromised. I would rather see a flexi lead on a dog in that type of environment, then get rudely blindsided by a dog running loose.

          Comment


          • #45
            Originally posted by Hannahsmom View Post
            For all you flexi-haters, let me tell you the perfect example of a use for them: I was walking my two Border Terriers today in the woods and streams of 200 acres. My youngster has a very good recall but I don't entirely trust it will be perfect if a fox or coyote shows up. So when I entered the woods, I put the young dog on the Flexi. He was still enjoying a 'free' walk in the fields but I had control just in case. No other people around. When a couple of deer crossed our path, he was interested but on the flexi, I had control. Flexi's have no place in confined or crowded areas, they are a great tool out in the wide open spaces.
            I initially missed this post, but this is perfect example of when I think flexis are very valuable.

            Comment


            • #46
              I also can't handle people who use flexi leashes inappropriately. Perhaps I should be more global than that... what I really can't handle is people who don't bother learning how to train their dog. Basic obedience is not rocket science, good instructors are relatively easy to come by, and once you've learned and applied those principles you, your dog and everyone around you will be happier!

              Then you can use your flexi or chain or pinch collar and use it intelligently!
              Reasons I'm crazy, #37: I went out shopping for a pony and came home with a 17hh OTTB
              ~~Member of the TB's Rule Clique ~~

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              • #47
                All collars and leads need to be used properly. However, the misuse of flexi leads I would wager to say is around 90 percent. No one will ever change my mind on it, they just are not appropriate for most situations and most clueless owners.

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                • #48
                  Originally posted by tradewind View Post
                  All collars and leads need to be used properly. However, the misuse of flexi leads I would wager to say is around 90 percent. No one will ever change my mind on it, they just are not appropriate for most situations and most clueless owners.
                  Yeah, when even people who claim to use them 'correctly' estimate that 'right' usage hover around maybe 1% of the times the item is used, that's not really much of a vote for their existence.

                  Comment


                  • #49
                    Originally posted by My Two Cents View Post
                    Wow! If people actually heeded the warnings from the company maybe there wouldn't be so many complaints. Cuts, burns, amputations?! Kudos to those 1% that use the product correctly. The other 99%, well, enough said.

                    http://www.flexiusa.com/operation/safety-advice.php
                    WOW--you don't even have to read it. Just look at the graphics!
                    2012 goal: learn to ride like a Barn Rat

                    A helmet saved my life.

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                    • #50
                      yep, I hate them!! A friend of mine got caught in one and got rope burn on her tattoo. I agree that the people that use them dont know how to control their dog. There are uses for them, like a dog that isnt under voice control that wants to go for a swim but the owner doesnt. A rope works just a good though.

                      Theres a lady in my neighborhood that has two malteses and she uses these leads. She has no control over the dogs and they arent nice dogs. We cross the street when we see her coming.

                      Comment


                      • #51
                        I have limited mobility due to problems with my knees and ankles. My terriers have no such problem. When I'm travelling to/from terrier trials I use flexi-leads for exercising the dogs and I have no trouble walking 2 at one time. The dogs are used to them. I know how to use the brake and the braking noise to control them. My fiance' can't figure out how to use them so he uses regular leashes (which my dogs also know and respect); he's also far more ambulatory than I am. When we are at trials both of us walk the dogs on regular leashes. I don't know why anyone would use them from walking from the car to the vet's office.

                        What I don't understand are the flexi-lunge lines for horses. Those never seemed like a good idea to me.
                        ~Kryswyn~ Always look on the bright side of life, de doo, de doo de doo de doo
                        Check out my Kryswyn JRTs on Facebook

                        "Life is merrier with a terrier!"

                        Comment


                        • #52
                          I have been around the bad side of flexible leash users (worked at shelter, vet clinic, have shopped at petco, etc.). In the average hands, they can be a nightmare.

                          However, I have used them and love them for a very particular scenario. For me and my dog, it was hiking in the woods when we were not practicing heeling/loose leash walking (and not on a regular length leash). Dog in harness so no confusion with pulling against a collar. Audible commands well established, so that "go ahead" meant you may go ahead of me on your flexi; "back to me" meant slow-stop and allow me to catch up right now. It worked very well for us, well enough that when my dog died after a good long life I kept that lead for the future.

                          Well trained dog and competent handler who is paying attention - they can be a unique tool. Average dog owner and average dog? Equals threads like this one
                          edited to add, the comment about the JRTs as self-animated tether balls? You made my day, that was awesome!
                          Last edited by mtnjen; May. 2, 2011, 04:14 PM. Reason: tether ball!

                          Comment


                          • #53
                            A woman in town had just picked her PWD up from the groomer's. Busy street...Flexi-lead....largeish boisterous freshly groomed doggie....inattentive owner....you can guess what happened...a beautifully coiffed corpse.

                            So sad, especially for the person who hit him-having many times been the target of many a (mostly herding) dog's rapt attention while driving, then watching said dog lungeing at my car as I go by, I always pray the dog isn't on a flexi, hold my breath until safely past, then swear like hell at the clueless owner. Ah, the joys of suburbia.

                            I've seen and been the target of MANY lungeing dogs while walking my guys, running, etc., and I teach my clients to first look for a flexi when sizing up how to navigate the dog+owner distraction. If its on a flexi, RETREAT up a driveway or cross the street--don't trust that the owner has control, because usually he/she does not. (Apologies to those COTHers who use them responsibly:I'd expect that from those who work around horses!)

                            Comment


                            • #54
                              Originally posted by TheJenners View Post
                              "He's just saying hi!" pisses me off more than flexi leads ever could. UGH!
                              I hear and HATE this one-"HE'S FRIENDLY!! HEEEEEE"S FRIENDLY!!!!" -Usually screeched at me while said "friendly"dog flys offlead at my dogs, hackles up and growling....almost ALWAYS a large male dog,......MAYBE MINE AREN'T!! EVER THINK OF THAT, DEARIE???

                              Comment


                              • #55
                                Well I love a good rant. Can't keep all that emotion pent up inside!

                                I'm sure everyone on here who "hates" flexi-leads actually hates the ignorance behind their misuse = )

                                I personally like a long line for recall stuff, but I could see a flexi-lead being super handy as well once you got used to it. And for roaming walks in the country with well behaved dogs, why not?

                                Still, it's strange to me how they caught on like wildfire with the uneducated poor handling crowd. I mean, I can understand uneducated horse people improperly using "gadgets" like martingales, stronger bits, and draw reins in an effort to control a poorly trained horse. Imagine if everyone started using longe lines instead of proper length lead ropes on horses that were too much hassle? Eeek! Or instead of overbitting a strong spoiled horse, they just took the bridle off and went with it (without proper training first, of course). Yikes!

                                Oh, and for those that doubt the "amputee" factor of these things... Some of them (maybe the off brands?) are literally like a thin little wire/cord thing. I have NO doubt it could slice to the bone if you got clotheslined by a rambunctious pup! The "tape" ones are much preferred.

                                Comment


                                • #56
                                  Originally posted by Laurierace View Post
                                  Not a fan of the flexi leash but my pet peeve is the inappropriately used choke chain. Maybe if they changed the name people wouldn't think they work by pulling constantly for so long that the dog loses consciousness.
                                  Thank you for using the word "inappropriately". So many well-meaning people immediately think that I'm a horrible pet owner when they see that Tucker ( 70lb Siberian Husky) wears a pinch collar when outside. What they're missing is that 99% of the time, it's hanging totally slack around his neck because I've trained him to heel, walk past distractions and look to me for direction. I call it my "E brake".
                                  www.cobjockey.com - Eventing the Welsh Cob

                                  Comment


                                  • #57
                                    I believe there is one, and only one, appropriate use for a flexi type leash: to comply with leash laws with a dog who is 100% reliable off leash.
                                    If you just want to give your dog more room to roam in a rural/isolated setting a long line is a far better, safer choice.
                                    If you're working on a recall a long line is a far better choice.

                                    You have zero control over a dog on a flexi with the actual leash- you can't physically pull the dog to you if necessary or if the dog ignores your recall, and most people aren't fast enough to lock the brake in an emergency. So you shouldn't use one, ever, unless you can verbally control the dog.

                                    Recent horror story (one of a long list): walking dogs late at night for potty purposes. Stop at curb to check for cars. Suddenly two dogs on flexis charge all the way across the road and attack us. If a car had been coming, dead flexi dogs. The owner hadn't seen us in the dark, and had no way to lock the brake in time, and since you can't "reel in" a dog with a flexi he couldn't get them back without chasing after them (risking himself being hit by a car).

                                    Hate is not a strong enough word for how I feel about them. They're only used by people who have no idea how to properly train/walk their dogs, or are just too lazy to care. Have you ever seen one single person walking their dog in a correct heal position with a flexi-leash? Nope...I didn't think so. Everybody just lets their dogs wander willy nilly in front of them
                                    agree about the flexis, disagree about the idea that dogs must always walk "correctly" in heel position. On exercise jogs I really prefer the dogs to be out in front of me so I can see where they are, if they are moving at a proper trotting gait, and aren't panting too hard, and I don't risk tripping over one of them (which is quite easy to do with a dog in heel). Plus our trails are quite narrow and it's often quite difficult to fit down them if you are side-by-side. On lazy sniff and wander walks I let them do whatever they want as long as they don't pull on the leash and eventually move in the direction I want to go in. I only ask for a heel in competition or when moving through crowded areas. Teaching a dog to walk on a loose leash and teaching a dog to heel are completely different skills. Flexis teach dogs to pull.

                                    Comment


                                    • #58
                                      Originally posted by CobJockey View Post
                                      Thank you for using the word "inappropriately". So many well-meaning people immediately think that I'm a horrible pet owner when they see that Tucker ( 70lb Siberian Husky) wears a pinch collar when outside. What they're missing is that 99% of the time, it's hanging totally slack around his neck because I've trained him to heel, walk past distractions and look to me for direction. I call it my "E brake".
                                      I love choke chains when used correctly. To me it's the same as putting a chain over a horse's nose. Most of the time you don't have to use it but it's nice to have it there just in case.
                                      McDowell Racing Stables

                                      Home Away From Home

                                      Comment


                                      • #59
                                        [QUOTE=wendy;5584495]I believe there is one, and only one, appropriate use for a flexi type leash: to comply with leash laws with a dog who is 100% reliable off leash.
                                        QUOTE]

                                        In my community, the leash law explicitly states that the leash must be no more than 6 feet in length, so even in this case flexi's are not appropriate.
                                        Reasons I'm crazy, #37: I went out shopping for a pony and came home with a 17hh OTTB
                                        ~~Member of the TB's Rule Clique ~~

                                        Comment


                                        • #60
                                          I hate them...and I'm not coordinated enough to use the effectively. They tend to choke themselves leaning on them. I am much better with normal leashes that they will 'heel' with.

                                          However, a flexi leash DID save my sister's maltese! I was walking my sisters dog in our neighborhood. There was a stray chow that thought the poor little dog was a appetizer just waiting to happen. Of course, the maltese didn't sense any danger as the chow came running at her. I released the lock and her little 4lb self went flying through the air. And then I had to grab the leash and hold her up in the air by her little halter to escape the chow. That is the one and only time I've ever found a flexileash to be helpful!
                                          "I'm holding out for the $100,000 Crossrail Classic in 2012." --mem
                                          "With all due respect.. may I suggest you take up Croquet?" --belambi
                                          Proud Member of the Opinionated Redhead Club!

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