• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

dog acl surgery?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • dog acl surgery?

    My 9 year old labrador is scheduled for acl (conventional) surgery next week. She blew out her left hind knee. Does anyone have experience with this? I'm worried about making sure she heals properly and doesn't injure it afterwards. How do you keep an active dog quiet and keep her from being totally bored? Vet said 2 weeks of one room confinement and 6 weeks of light walking. Any helpful tips would be much appreciated. Thanks!

  • #2
    Wow! Your vet is being really nice in terms of the "stall rest"...My last dog (2 years ago, died of something unrelated) had 2 ACL repairs. Orthopedic surgeon required had us do 1 MONTH cage rest (only allowed to go to the bathroom), 1 month of 3-5/10 minute walks a day and 1 month of slowly allowing her back to her normal routine.

    Make sure you go to an orthopedic surgeon and not a regular vet!!!
    Kristen

    Kiwayu & Figiso Pictures:
    http://community.webshots.com/user/kiwayu

    Comment


    • #3
      Sorry you have to go through this. My 18 month old Cavalier boy is 5 weeks out from patella surgery. Still on the leash-only plan when outside. No running, jumping etc for another 3 weeks at least!
      Hope your Lab is crate-trained. Having them used to that makes it easier. I also used an ex pen to keep him off the furniture and restrict his movement in the house. With a bigger dog you might need to look into baby gates to restrict him to one room.
      At first, it wasnt too difficult to keep him quiet. It has become more challenging as he feels better. His sister inviting him to play doesnt help either! Chew toys help. I use Kongs but have to be careful with the stuffing as I dont want him to gain weight. I ended up using bits of carrot topped with spray cheese! If your Lab is a chewer like most, nylabones and the like will probably help him pass the time.
      Good luck with surgery and rehab.

      Comment


      • #4
        my dog had ACL repair done about a year ago, and had a much more intensive recovery - more like what Kiwayu explained. Your dog will be in pain, on meds etc. that will make her not want to run etc. etc.

        The hardest part for me was getting my dog to poop- she didn't go for 4 days! I was worried and then finally she went.

        Please be careful with the recovery- it really is the most important part- my aunts lab had surgery a few weeks after my dog- she did was much more lax with her recovery and ended up having to take her to physical therapy for six months. I might have the info my vet sent me, if I can find it I will send it to you.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Kiwayu View Post
          Wow! Your vet is being really nice in terms of the "stall rest"...My last dog (2 years ago, died of something unrelated) had 2 ACL repairs. Orthopedic surgeon required had us do 1 MONTH cage rest (only allowed to go to the bathroom), 1 month of 3-5/10 minute walks a day and 1 month of slowly allowing her back to her normal routine.

          Make sure you go to an orthopedic surgeon and not a regular vet!!!
          This. We now do adequan injections every other month also. I hope not to have to do it again. Recovery time was way more time than I expected.
          "I don't know what your generation's fascination is with documenting your every thought... but I can assure you, they're not all diamonds." Mr. G

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Kiwayu View Post
            Wow! Your vet is being really nice in terms of the "stall rest"... Orthopedic surgeon required had us do 1 MONTH cage rest (only allowed to go to the bathroom), 1 month of 3-5/10 minute walks a day and 1 month of slowly allowing her back to her normal routine.

            Make sure you go to an orthopedic surgeon and not a regular vet!!!
            This is about what my rat terrier had to do after his ACL surgery. He had it done when he was twelve and that was three years ago. He is still cranking along with the help of joint supps, and the occasional NSAID. Good luck to you and your lab. Don't let sad faces break the rehab phase. your baby needs to heal properly.

            Comment

            • Original Poster

              #7
              Thanks everyone! I do plan on being really careful and patient with her recovery. She's so used to being active and spoiled (sleeps in the bed, etc.), I worry about her being depressed and bored. Also I can't stand seeing her in pain. I'll have to toughen up....not give in tho the "sad" face! Anyone try swimming during rehab? If so, how long after surgery?

              Comment


              • #8
                Our family dog had 2 ACL repair surgeries. We took him to Virginia Tech to the orthopedic surgeons who did an AMAZING job. His "stall rest" was much longer than your vet is recommending. He was on Rimadyl and other stuff (maybe cosequin or adequan) forever after that. He lived 8 years after, but sadly, had to be put down due to on going pain that one day increased drastically.

                Not trying to bring you down, just have to be realistic. He had an AMAZING 8 years after the surgery. Not pain free, but much less pain and it was managed for the most part. Good luck with yours!
                Charlie Brown (1994 bay TB X gelding)
                White Star (2004 grey TB gelding)

                Mystical Moment, 1977-2010.

                Comment


                • #9
                  My dog (Golden cross, fairly big) had his done a little over a year ago. I was careful to follow the vet's advice for his recovery period, and it was uneventful. The first week or two the rest isn't an issue as it's painful and they don't want to do much. Going out was a challenge since I live in a second-floor apartment, but we managed with the help of a towel for support. My dog was super careful of it for a long time, not running on it etc. even after the vet gave the okay for off leash forays. Then one day I looked and he was running-sound on all four legs-what a sight!

                  He's the third dog I've had who's had the traditional surgery (all large dogs; others were a lab cross and a massively oversized Beagle I'd have pegged as a Harrier if I didn't have his AKC papers) and all have done fine. Vet's instructions were followed to the T and were much the same as your vet's instructions except for the lab cross as she had other damage as well. AS has been said, make sure you don't get lax with the directions, or it could end up taking longer!

                  Comment

                  • Original Poster

                    #10
                    Another question....Did you go visit your dog in the doggy hospital afterwards? Vet says she'll probably stay 2 nights. I feel I want to visit of course, but not if it's more upsetting to her to see me and not come home. What do you think?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      swimming is a great way to rehab- just be careful about the getting in getting out part! I starting swimming my dog about 3 months after the surgery. My aunt (see my first post) actually started about a month after and that is what messed up the leg.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Our lab has had the acl surgery on both of her hind legs. At the time she had the first surgery, the surgeon told us that most labs who have had one leg done, will most likely to have the other leg done. Almost exactly a year later the other leg had to be done. Sam had an uneventful recovery both times, and is on joint supplements.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Showme, they'll probably have her pretty drugged up, ask the vet what they think about visitors. I would invest in a nice comfy dog bed for her, our dog never slept on them before the surgery but now he seeks out the newer carpeting or piles of blankets.

                          Our dog tore both acls, a few years apart. Vet also told us to expect that. Ours was caused from the dog being on a line in the yard. He knew exactly where the chain ended, so he'd go racing after something and then throw on the brakes right before the end. He's not allowed on a line anymore, and is forbidden from jumping up on beds (shame, he gave great 'good mornings'). We felt bad that he couldn't just sit outside anymore, so in exchange for getting rid of the line, we got in the habit of taking him on a walk every time he has to go out. Now he gets at least 2 decent walks a day, plus a few shorter ones. I like to think he's pretty happy about this.

                          Start feeding joint supplements, but expect some arthritis anyway. And the best way to keep it at bay is to keep the dog active and at a healthy weight.
                          "Things turn out best for the people who make the best of the way things turn out." ~John Wooden

                          Phoenix Animal Rescue

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I have a friend who is a vet tech herself and owns a big lab mix who is about 90+ lbs and is 2 years old. He has had ACL surgery twice and there are two methods although I'm not sure what they are called - one surgery reattaches ligament to ligament and one surgery attaches the ends of the ligament to a metal plate in the middle. Don't know which you are having done, but her dog had the ligament to ligament done twice and its said to hold up less, especially in larger dogs, but it was 600 versus 2400 to have done so she went ahead with the cheaper one. She did 3 months of rest, mostly in the crate for the first month and a half or so, leash walks only, no playing, etc. for the duration of the 3 months and he re-tore it about a month after doing that rehab and she did the same surgery again. It's been about 5 months now since his second surgery and he definitely still favors it, it's hard finding a balance between allowing him to be a dog and keeping him from re-injuring it. She has 3 other big dogs in her house and he loves to play with my 2 boxers as well, but when he runs even for a few minutes he comes back limping and sometimes holding his leg in the air. If he tears it again she will go with the more expensive surgery and hope it holds up better, but like I said it's really hard to find a balance between keeping their leg together and letting them have fun. What's the point in doing the surgery if they're going to live the rest of their lives cooped up and not enjoying being a dog? My brother's lab has also gone through the surgery twice, but I don't know specific details on that. Good luck to your dog and please be aware that (in my opinion) 2 weeks of one room confinement is NOT enough for him to be rehabbed properly. One room is more than enough room for him to bounce off the walls and 2 weeks is not long enough.
                            "to live is the rarest thing in the world, most people merely exist."

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by ponies123 View Post
                              I have a friend who is a vet tech herself and owns a big lab mix who is about 90+ lbs and is 2 years old. He has had ACL surgery twice and there are two methods although I'm not sure what they are called - one surgery reattaches ligament to ligament and one surgery attaches the ends of the ligament to a metal plate in the middle. Don't know which you are having done, but her dog had the ligament to ligament done twice and its said to hold up less, especially in larger dogs, but it was 600 versus 2400 to have done so she went ahead with the cheaper one.
                              There isn't, to my knowledge (having been a vet tech at a large referral hospital with 2 board certified ortho vets) a surgery that attaches ligament to ligament. There is a surgery commonly referred to as "traditional" repair. It's fishing line, applied in a figure-8 around the joint to stablize it. It is about $600. I went through 3 of these surgeries with my Samoyed years ago (yes, the same dog, one leg once, the other leg twice as the line broke the 1st time).

                              I now have a Lab that ruptured her ACL 13 months ago at 3 years of age. We opted for the more expensive surgery (actually over $4000). She had a TPLO (tibial plateau leveling osteotomy) - that's where they use a crescent-shaped cut on the top of the tibia, rotate it so it is at a proper angle and apply metal bone plates & screws to hold it all in place.

                              Knock wood, she's doing very well. She's very active, no restrictions. We did keep her on Recovery SA as a joint supplement for about 6 months after the surgery - I've also used that supplement on our elderly dog and I swear, it works wonders.

                              The vets I worked with recommend the TPLO for any dog over 50 lbs.

                              Looking at my Lab that had the TPLO - you would never know she had any issues.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                ACL repair post-op

                                I worked at a small animal surgery for a few years (til better pay and health insurance lured me to a desk job).

                                Your pup won't want to run and play initially. Some vets go very easy on the pain meds to increase the dog's self-restriction.

                                I would crate instead of room confine. It's a lot of money and you don't want to waste it. I have seen many small dogs have the standard ACL repair and never return to weight-bearing: instead they skip along three-legged. The owners were lenient on confinement. This is less common in large dogs because their size encourages them to use all four.

                                Also, another poster was dead-on about needing the second knee in a year. There is something like a 75% chance of the second knee going within 18months. Starting a glucosamine supplement now may help ward this off. Reducing high-impact, sharp-turning activities will also help prevent this but that's a tough decision.

                                Some hospitals allow visiting. Hopefully you know your dog's level of separation anxiety: sometimes an owner comes to visit their snoozing pup who was knocked out snoring away. It goes nuts during/after the visit, unable to rest again for the night. It is really unfortunate when a visit causes more distress. Please analyze your pet and recognize if the visit is more for the person than the pet. (for what it's worth when my own dog had surgery at my workplace, I stayed away because I know it would distress him.)

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by tarynls View Post
                                  I now have a Lab that ruptured her ACL 13 months ago at 3 years of age. We opted for the more expensive surgery (actually over $4000). She had a TPLO (tibial plateau leveling osteotomy) - that's where they use a crescent-shaped cut on the top of the tibia, rotate it so it is at a proper angle and apply metal bone plates & screws to hold it all in place.

                                  Knock wood, she's doing very well. She's very active, no restrictions. We did keep her on Recovery SA as a joint supplement for about 6 months after the surgery - I've also used that supplement on our elderly dog and I swear, it works wonders.

                                  The vets I worked with recommend the TPLO for any dog over 50 lbs.

                                  Looking at my Lab that had the TPLO - you would never know she had any issues.
                                  My lab (46lbs) had this surgery done on both legs 5 years ago and you'd never know it, except for some stiffness after vigorous extended playing! She was crated for about 6 weeks after each surgery, and ACE was our friend to stop her chewing and clawing her way out! So glad we chose TPLO over traditional, my friend had to take her pooch back in to get hers re-done as TPLO!!
                                  Go Ahead: This is a dare, not permission. Don't Do It!

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Cost of the former is usually in the $ 2000 or larger is more expensive because it involves hardware and the surgical skill. Is a very pleasant, suitable for larger dogs and now is usually done by specialists. The second is an old method, but still pretty good is better for smaller breeds of dogs, and generally less expensive generally less than $ 2000. However, in some cases can be performed by a veterinarian at home or traveling veterinarian with experience.
                                    Promo Directory | Online Coupon Directory

                                    Comment

                                    Working...
                                    X