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Animal Clinics and Covid

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    #21
    Originally posted by Rackonteur View Post
    w.
    I don't want to hand over my terrified cat to a bunch of strangers who will take her behind closed door locking me out. They took my cats behind closed door into the lab for blood draws, etc., at our previous vet, but I had seen those vets and techs with us in the exam room and got an idea of how they handled my cats. And owners were not locked out of the lab. We were not allowed to go in, but there were no locks on the doors.

    I hate that my cat is hobbling a little. But I hate more that this vet did not care that she and I were afraid. Their response to my concerns was rudeness and a complete absence of sympathy or empathy.
    I bet pediatricians do not force parents to drop their kids off at the door and then lock the parents out.
    I agree. It sucks when you are dealing with strangers, and have to hand off your pet. Them being rude to you would have left me uneasy too. There were a lot of clinics, especially chains, where they were taking the animal and doing everything in the back before COVID. I hate that with a passion, but as you say, if you know the people at least you know you can trust them.

    Comment


      #22
      Originally posted by Rackonteur View Post
      w.
      I don't want to hand over my terrified cat to a bunch of strangers who will take her behind closed door locking me out. They took my cats behind closed door into the lab for blood draws, etc., at our previous vet, but I had seen those vets and techs with us in the exam room and got an idea of how they handled my cats. And owners were not locked out of the lab. We were not allowed to go in, but there were no locks on the doors.

      I hate that my cat is hobbling a little. But I hate more that this vet did not care that she and I were afraid. Their response to my concerns was rudeness and a complete absence of sympathy or empathy.
      I bet pediatricians do not force parents to drop their kids off at the door and then lock the parents out.
      I agree. After a horrendous experience with another vet long ago, I absolutely refuse to not be in the room. I don't care. I will be there, or you will NOT see my animal.

      My dog was rushed to an emergency vet - not my usual one - with gunshot wounds. The vet was - well, let's just say I was glad when a bull got him some time later. We told him she would bite, especially since she was in pain. He refused to listen, and when she nipped at him, started to haul off and strike her across the face. We were told to leave. HE NEVER TOUCHED HER AFTER THAT. He left her to die with vetrap still around her muzzle.

      If the vet was rude and dismissive, find a new one ASAP. If they're rude to you, how are they treating your cat?

      Comment


        #23
        The first time I had to take my dog in, they brought me in with him and put us straight into a room. You called when you arrived and waited in your car. Then, they came and took you to a room to wait for the exam to be carried out. Once that was done, then you went and stood at the desk to pay, so that part wasn't any different ime.

        This week, I had to take our office dog into the same vet and the process was different. Luckily, this was not my personal dog because my dog would have had a full-on meltdown with the new routine. This time, I called when I arrived and waited in the car. A tech came out and took down the information, why we were there. Then a bit later, a tech came and took the dog inside while I waited outside. The vet then came out and spoke to me at my truck and we set up surgery for the following day. It was requested that the dog stayed over the night before and the night after surgery to avoid any contact issues with having to have the incision checked and re-bandaged and to pre-medicate. I picked him up today and had to call when I arrived for pick up, then they came out and collected the rest of the payment (I left a deposit beforehand), then they brought the dog out to me.

        From what I saw, the vets came out to speak with every owner themselves, and I'm pretty sure I saw one vet give in an exam on the tailgate of a truck, so I think they likely would have examined my dog outside if needed. I did see people in the cattle barn though, and those people might have been owners that they allowed in.
        Rhode Islands are red;
        North Hollands are blue.
        Sorry my thoroughbreds
        Stomped on your roo. Originally Posted by pAin't_Misbehavin' :

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          #24
          I spend part of my time working emergency medicine. I'm in an essentially unaffected state, I do NOT want someone on vacation from North Carolina who didn't give a *** about self quarantining next to me in a tiny exam room. Veterinarians have largely kept working while many human GPs stopped seeing patients. If I or one of the techs goes down with Covid, the entire ER is going to have to close for at least two weeks. It's a risk management decided not to take.

          Comment


            #25
            And, yes, I HAVE been the pet parent in this situation. My husband raced to the ER with neurologist on staff in May with our youngest and handed her over without complaint. Just told them that they should go ahead with an MRI and that they didn't need to call me first. Just treat her. Here's the dog's Care Credit card.

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              #26
              I've been to my vet three times in the last week and a half, twice last week to drop off and pick up a barn cat when going to morning drop off would be sooner than their first available appointment, once yesterday when I had an appointment for a recheck/topping off her shots. Not vaccination shots but acute problem shots. She got into something she was allergic to, was filled with steroids and antibiotics last week, and they wanted to see her again for round two to make sure she was doing better (which she was) and to repeat the meds to make sure they stomped on it thoroughly, because she was chewing into herself.

              They are not limiting to curbside, but they had signs up all over the place so that no matter which parking spot you picked (all are against the building), they had signs in the windows right in front of you. These said only one person allowed in with animal, only six people allowed in total, and please socially distance. They have a lobby with capacity for more than six even socially distanced. They had folding tables set up in front of the reception desk to back folks off some. Everybody I saw was obediently social distancing. It was actually one of the most relaxing times I've been in, because somehow my luck always runs to a dog on a flexi with an oblivious owner and the dog trying to "say hi" to my cats. This time, every person in there was very aware of space, and all dog owners had their pets nicely in hand right beside them. I only interacted with reception the first day on drop off and return, since I didn't have an appointment then. She did say that they have an excellent ventilation system and are extra sanitizing the rooms, too.

              When I was picking up the cat a week ago after having taken her to drop off, I fell into a conversation with a man next in line to check out. He was a good 10 feet away, but we were talking while they had gone back to retrieve the cat, so things were stalled for a bit. He had a GSD that obviously had some issues, NQR behind, but was also very well behaved and responsive to him. He struck up the conversation and asked me if I'd been coming there long. I said I'd been coming there for 20 years. He asked what I thought about the place, and I said I thought they were wonderful, very caring and knowledgeable. He nodded and said he had just started coming there a few days ago. He said he was new to the area, and his GSD was 13. She had issues, obviously, and he was trying to get established with a new vet, but another clinic he went to was not only curbside but also was very short, rude, didn't want to take time with him and his dog going over history, and actually called him from the clinic while he waited in his car to say the dog was hopeless and should be put down, very abruptly, not caring and explanatory per his account. Just an attitude of "this one's totaled. You're wasting our time here." This is a dog he knew had problems but he had had all her life, and he had been treating her for a few years in his former location. He told the first clinic forget it, then came to this clinic. He said in two appointments, previous week and today, they had listened thoroughly, suggested a few med changes, and she was doing better than she had been. He was very impressed, but he was glad to get a long-term client assessment, too. (By the way, they have told me definitely, though not abruptly and with compassionate explanation, on a few occasions when they did think an animal was at the end of the road. They aren't afraid of having that conversation. If they had thought the dog was hopeless and suffering, they would have said so.)

              COVID or not, there is no excuse for being rude, abrupt, and not listening. Love my vet.

              Now available in Kindle as well as print: C-Sharp Minor: My Mother's Seventeen-Year Journey through Dementia. 10% of my proceeds will be donated to the Alzheimer's Association.

              Comment


                #27
                My dog has her yearly check-up and some vaccinations tomorrow, and our vet is doing drop off appointments. My girl is rather aloof and is going to fight being taken away from me. She tends to overreact and blow up a bit if people she doesn't know or trust try to do stuff with her - if I'm there, I can calm her down and get her brain back into her head and she's then fine. So, I'm nervous about how it's going to go. My biggest fear is that the clinic is next to a busy road, so I keep envisioning her getting away as she's taken away from me and running into traffic. Putting a no slip collar on her and will ask the vet tech to carry her in since she's a small dog, but it's giving me a little anxiety!

                Comment


                  #28
                  My vet is all curbside. Text upon arrival, give them the details. They come get the animal and the bet calls you to talk. Tech brings animal back and gets payment. It's been wonderful to not be in a crowded waiting room with strangers and their manner less dogs.

                  I totally understand the OPs frustration and anxiety with a new vet, though, that's hard. I've been with this practice for several years and trust them to handle my animals.

                  Comment


                    #29
                    Originally posted by DoubleClick View Post
                    My dog has her yearly check-up and some vaccinations tomorrow, and our vet is doing drop off appointments. My girl is rather aloof and is going to fight being taken away from me. She tends to overreact and blow up a bit if people she doesn't know or trust try to do stuff with her - if I'm there, I can calm her down and get her brain back into her head and she's then fine. So, I'm nervous about how it's going to go. My biggest fear is that the clinic is next to a busy road, so I keep envisioning her getting away as she's taken away from me and running into traffic. Putting a no slip collar on her and will ask the vet tech to carry her in since she's a small dog, but it's giving me a little anxiety!
                    I've taken my cats in carriers and my dogs are on stout leashes and harnesses. Maybe you could consider getting a carrier for your small dog so that you have one less thing to be anxious about.

                    Comment


                      #30
                      We regularly go to the regular vet and a vet hospital for internist appointments. Being in New Jersey/NYC suburbs, we have been curbside since mid-March and it's worked fine.

                      The internist's hospital has a SMS program that you text your dog's name, your name, and your parking spot number - they'll call ahead to do the COVID-19 health check and then you meet the technician outside your car with your pet. After a quick check, the vet calls, you chat, they run the necessary tests, and they bill over the phone. Our regular vet has you call in which can be a nightmare because for some reason there's been a huge uptick in visits and calls, but they do roughly the same procedure otherwise. Our area has been hit really hard so everyone knows to be careful (or should know, whether or not they respect it is another thing).

                      My dog hates the vet and is a quivering ball of drool, but technicians will carry her (so she doesn't have to walk on hot macadam) and when it rained, wrapped her up in a towel to keep her dry. They definitely seem to prefer animals in carriers if at all possible (her crate is a Gunner Kennel crate, so it's strapped and heavy - so not an option).

                      Comment


                        #31
                        I have been going to my exclusively cat vet for years. They were curbside for a long time. However, when my old cat had a stroke, on a Sunday, I called the emergency number, my vet told me to bring her in and she would meet me there. When I got there, both cat and I were allowed in the office. I was able to be with her when she was put to sleep, for which I was extremely grateful.

                        I'm in NY state, not in the city, and I think that the vet is back to doing normal office hours. I have an appointment in August for a routine vaccination for my young cat. Because I am vulnerable on several levels, I am going to request curbside. The relationship I have had with this vet over the years means that I have absolute trust in how they are going to handle him.
                        If you are neutral in situations of injustice, you have chosen the side of the oppressor.
                        Desmond Tutu

                        Comment


                          #32
                          Ours is still curbside, and we've spent quite a bit of time in thier parking lot this spring and summer as we have a houseful of elderly animals that are slowly falling apart. I sort of like it... their techs are great, the system works smoothly, and the vet calls during the exam with her phone on speaker, so we can have the same conversation we'd have otherwise. I really have no complaints -- and I'm the grown up 12-year-old girl who LOVES taking Fluffy to the vet because I secretly wish I could be one! As Marshfield said, I'm not thrilled with the idea of being in a closed room with other people no matter how careful we're all being. And, when it's time to put one down, there's a euthanasia vet who will come to our back yard.

                          Comment


                            #33
                            Ours are still doing the curbside service. The specialty clinic has you go right inside the door and put them into a crate, and then they call you and you go get them back out of the crate.
                            I don’t really mind the curbside service but I do have a sincere question. When do you see it returning to “normal”? I read yesterday that Dr. Fauci said that Covid might always be with us, and so I’ve been wondering about how people see moving forward, considering that the risk may not ever be eliminated. Hopefully there will be an amazing vaccine or better yet, treatment available soon, but it’s possible that it may never be “safe.”
                            As far as the office having to shut down due to exposure, well ... Not having clients in there certainly reduces the opportunity, so I can completely see why they’re doing it. However, I suspect we will be seeing that and seeing it often as every tech, every receptionist, every kennel attendant has other contacts that they’re around. I was reading an instagram post from a business in south Texas and it talked about how behind they were because of self quarantines due to exposure. It seems like it’s going to roll through areas and when it does, it will affect all kinds of people.

                            Comment

                              Original Poster

                              #34
                              Originally posted by DoubleClick View Post
                              My dog has her yearly check-up and some vaccinations tomorrow, and our vet is doing drop off appointments. My girl is rather aloof and is going to fight being taken away from me. She tends to overreact and blow up a bit if people she doesn't know or trust try to do stuff with her - if I'm there, I can calm her down and get her brain back into her head and she's then fine. So, I'm nervous about how it's going to go. My biggest fear is that the clinic is next to a busy road, so I keep envisioning her getting away as she's taken away from me and running into traffic. Putting a no slip collar on her and will ask the vet tech to carry her in since she's a small dog, but it's giving me a little anxiety!
                              I hope it goes well and that you and she will be fine. I do feel your anxiety. I would be anxious too -- to say the least!
                              Rack on!

                              Comment

                                Original Poster

                                #35
                                Originally posted by Casey09
                                I don’t really mind the curbside service but I do have a sincere question. When do you see it returning to “normal”? I read yesterday that Dr. Fauci said that Covid might always be with us, and so I’ve been wondering about how people see moving forward, considering that the risk may not ever be eliminated.
                                As long as people are alive there will be risk of deadly disease. Or bombs or plane crashes or car wrecks, or deadly storms, and so on and so on and so on.
                                We have vaccinations for flu and pneuomonia, both of which are known killers.
                                I lived through the AIDs reign of terror.
                                I am not trying to discount anyone's fear of covid.
                                But it is not the first disease that ever appeared on the earth.
                                And we defeated smallpox.
                                Maybe someone should pass a law requiring people to stay at least 6 feet away from horses. Because horses can kill people without meaning to.
                                Rack on!

                                Comment


                                  #36
                                  My vet is taking appts but the owner has to wait outside. They've been handling it pretty well. Basically you call in the parking lot, then a tech calls you back and gets a history about why pet is there. Then you wait and someone calls you and has you meet them at the door with the pet. The vet sees the pet immediately, then calls you and talks to you with findings/treatment options. The pet is really only inside for a few minutes. I was worried how my very reactive foster dog would handle it - she had an eye issue. But they are really good with her even when I"m there. I send her in with a baggie of her favorite treats and she handled it just fine.

                                  I also had to euthanize another foster dog last week. She had been seen by the vet a few times in the past 6 months but she stopped eating completely that weekend. So I called and asked them to get me in ASAP and I was there in an hour. I know some people have been having long wait times for appts but not at my vet. I was allowed to go in for the appt and they let me hold her while they gave her the necessary shots.

                                  This is a very busy vet practice with a lot of vets & techs and they definitely have it 'right'. I'm very lucky to have found them.

                                  Comment


                                    #37
                                    Originally posted by DoubleClick View Post
                                    My dog has her yearly check-up and some vaccinations tomorrow, and our vet is doing drop off appointments. My girl is rather aloof and is going to fight being taken away from me. She tends to overreact and blow up a bit if people she doesn't know or trust try to do stuff with her - if I'm there, I can calm her down and get her brain back into her head and she's then fine. So, I'm nervous about how it's going to go. My biggest fear is that the clinic is next to a busy road, so I keep envisioning her getting away as she's taken away from me and running into traffic. Putting a no slip collar on her and will ask the vet tech to carry her in since she's a small dog, but it's giving me a little anxiety!
                                    Does she have a favorite treat ? Something small and yummy ? I had a lot of luck sending one of my nervous/reactive fosters in with a baggie of her favorite treats and that helped a lot. She is VERY food motivated though. She came out wagging her tail and asking for more treats lol.

                                    Comment


                                      #38
                                      Originally posted by Rackonteur View Post

                                      As long as people are alive there will be risk of deadly disease. Or bombs or plane crashes or car wrecks, or deadly storms, and so on and so on and so on.
                                      We have vaccinations for flu and pneuomonia, both of which are known killers.
                                      I lived through the AIDs reign of terror.
                                      I am not trying to discount anyone's fear of covid.
                                      But it is not the first disease that ever appeared on the earth.
                                      And we defeated smallpox.
                                      Maybe someone should pass a law requiring people to stay at least 6 feet away from horses. Because horses can kill people without meaning to.
                                      Yeah, actually you are.

                                      Comment


                                        #39
                                        My vet clinic is doing curbside. Call when you arrive, talk to the tech over the phone to review symptoms, current food//meds etc, then attach dog to a carabiner outside and they take the dog inside for examination. After examining, the vet calls you with the results, transfers you to the front desk for payment, and then they bring the dog out, attached to the carabiner and you take the dog from there. They leave the reciept and meds on a tented table nearby.

                                        Unfortunately, I've had to use this service several times (hotspot, stomach illness, yearly shots). While I really miss being able to be in the exam room to see what they are doing, I haven't had any bad experiences with the curbside protocols. I've been going to the same clinic for 5 years, and of the 5 vets, there is only 1 that I really don't like, so I just make sure the scheduled appointments are not with her.

                                        Comment


                                          #40
                                          I just want to come back and say it's not that I don't trust my vet, it's that I don't trust my dog. We had a bad experience with an emergency vet while on vacation this winter (he got hurt, vet wouldn't let me hold him, didn't have a tech, dog was panicked and stressed when we came in and vet just grabbed the injured leg with dog was not restrained at all and he snapped at the vet and grazed his thumb). Anyway that was the last experience we've had with a vet and my guy is 120 lbs Mastiff/ Cane Corso mix, he's very well socialized but he is also super sensitive and a velcro pooch. I just don't want him to have another bad experience or the vet or the techs to get hurt. And I don't like setting animals up for failure
                                          No mourners, no funerals

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