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Competitions For Yearlings

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  • Competitions For Yearlings

    I'm training my first horse and im fairly used to just competing in reining with already broke 5-10 year olds. I plan to train him in reining, but I'd like to get him involved in some sort of show during his younger years. Just to get him out in the world and used to new places and the world of traveling. However, he's the first baby I will have shown and I am unfamiliar with the event circuits offered to yearlings and younger horses. Does anyone have any suggestions? Or any info on what they did with your yearling during their growing years? Did you just work on reining groundwork until they were ready to show?

  • #2
    I hope no one is showing yearlings under saddle.

    The appropriate shows would be halter classes for his age group.

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    • Original Poster

      #3
      Originally posted by Scribbler View Post
      I hope no one is showing yearlings under saddle.

      The appropriate shows would be halter classes for his age group.
      Yes, I never meant under saddle. I don't plan to put one on his back until he's 3. I've trained young horses before, but usually it was just reining ground work and for small periods of time. I've never owned a colt to decide for myself what his training and competing map would look like.

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      • #4
        Do you have any local saddle clubs? You could show him in halter just get experience. Some of the local ranch clubs will even have in hand trail classes.

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        • #5
          Not sure of the breed you have, but for AQHA a yearling would be eligible for halter and showmanship. Shows might also offer yearling lunge line, but it is not an AQHA approved event. Some breeds (I know APHA, not sure who else) also offer in hand trail for yearlings.

          The best little horse show series around! www.WinningWeekends.com

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          • Original Poster

            #6
            Originally posted by spotnnotfarm View Post
            Do you have any local saddle clubs? You could show him in halter just get experience. Some of the local ranch clubs will even have in hand trail classes.
            We do have a few small ones in the area I'll look into. Im out in a ritzy part of Cali right now so the horse community is small and mostly english, but I'm moving to NC in June. I do believe I've heard of some halter classes in the area I'll look into.

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            • Original Poster

              #7
              Originally posted by sahqueen View Post
              Not sure of the breed you have, but for AQHA a yearling would be eligible for halter and showmanship. Shows might also offer yearling lunge line, but it is not an AQHA approved event. Some breeds (I know APHA, not sure who else) also offer in hand trail for yearlings.
              He's a quarter horse, I think he would do really well with showmanship. Especially because he's a perlino so I think he'd stand out a bit. I'll have to see what's available around the area, I didn't really think of that until you mentioned it, thankyou! I don't think im gonna do any longe line though because I don't like to longe a horse too frequently.

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              • #8
                we have a Morgan yearling that has been shown in In-Hand Trail classes and halter ... going to shows is just another day in his life

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                he will be used as a competitive trail and eventing horse , fears nothing and is very handy

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by FaithView View Post

                  He's a quarter horse, I think he would do really well with showmanship. Especially because he's a perlino so I think he'd stand out a bit. I'll have to see what's available around the area, I didn't really think of that until you mentioned it, thankyou! I don't think im gonna do any longe line though because I don't like to longe a horse too frequently.
                  You may want to reconsider, as longe classes are about the skill of longe work and how the horse moves.
                  Other than training to teach those skills, you don't have to longe "too frequently"?

                  Then, not every horse is that amenable to working that well that young.
                  It does take a smart and sensible temperament, as clanter's colt above has, to be good at working well on hand to train and show.

                  An immature and flighty horse by nature would not be suitable, as you would have to train longer to get them where they listen and yes, over-longing any horse is not good, especially a very young one.

                  See which kind your horse is and then go by that?

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                  • Original Poster

                    #10
                    Originally posted by Bluey View Post

                    You may want to reconsider, as longe classes are about the skill of longe work and how the horse moves.
                    Other than training to teach those skills, you don't have to longe "too frequently"?

                    Then, not every horse is that amenable to working that well that young.
                    It does take a smart and sensible temperament, as clanter's colt above has, to be good at working well on hand to train and show.

                    An immature and flighty horse by nature would not be suitable, as you would have to train longer to get them where they listen and yes, over-longing any horse is not good, especially a very young one.

                    See which kind your horse is and then go by that?
                    I suppose you're right, he is a pretty calm colt. He is great being handled and responds really well to training. I don't doubt it's something he wouldn't pick up on quickly, I do just worry about over longing at his age. We will see how he handles on it though!

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                    • #11
                      Showmanship is good for yearlings. gets them out and listening, and the pivot and backing are good skills for a potential reining horse to have. I prefer to halter as "type" matters less.

                      I have judged yearling lunge line classes: yes, the horses have to be obedient as you have a tight time limit to show each directions, but it is really about judging movement and conditioning. If the horse leads well from both sides at walk/jog, then the transition to lunging is going to be easy.

                      In my area we also have barns that hold "fun obstacle days" that you can do in hand or under saddle. A good way to get your young horse exposed to things without any pressure of actually doing something specific.
                      Freeing worms from cans everywhere!

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                      • #12
                        It’s fairly easy to teach a horse to lunge...it wouldn’t be a highly stressful activity involving lots of lunging to teach them. My long yearlings learn how to lunge, 95% of their lunging is walking and trotting, listening to woah and turning to face. Most learn in a few sessions, especially if they are well handled before hand.

                        PS, out of curiosity, what is reining ground work?

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                        • #13
                          Yearling Longe line is easy to prepare with the right horse. Big round pen, 10 minutes a couple of times a week to understand wall, trot, and canter. Most folks don’t take more than 3-4 weeks prep before showing in the fall. Obviously, it CAN be overdone... but most of the serious LL competitors know at the end of the day it’s just a class of “squirrels on a leash” anyway. Ha!

                          Halter, In Hand trail are options, but really just hauling to the shows, getting a stall, walking around... all good for young horses with no pressure. I took my yearlings to local H/J shows just to hang out with the atmosphere and loud speakers and golf carts and it accomplished everything I needed it to.
                          Veni vidi vici. With a paint pony, nonetheless.

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                          • Original Poster

                            #14
                            Originally posted by TheHunterKid90 View Post
                            It’s fairly easy to teach a horse to lunge...it wouldn’t be a highly stressful activity involving lots of lunging to teach them. My long yearlings learn how to lunge, 95% of their lunging is walking and trotting, listening to woah and turning to face. Most learn in a few sessions, especially if they are well handled before hand.

                            PS, out of curiosity, what is reining ground work?

                            I didn't realize it didn't take so much, as i've not used a whole lot of it in the past. I guess thats another thing I can add to the list, though I'll probably end up only sticking to one, as only one can be a lot to balance at times lol!

                            As for reining ground work I just meant your typical reining skills done from the ground. Maybe there's better terms for it, im definitely not from any big horse states. I learned most everything I know from my family and a local trainer that was always at our barn growing up.
                            They were all about teaching a horse everything they need to know on the ground first and then in the saddle. Almost everything a horse needs to learn to do for reining can be taught from the ground and often times they understand it better once its time to get in the saddle. I wouldn't do a lot of it at this age, but some short lessons here and there every other day are good to help build off of once he's a bit older.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by FaithView View Post

                              As for reining ground work I just meant your typical reining skills done from the ground. Maybe there's better terms for it, im definitely not from any big horse states. I learned most everything I know from my family and a local trainer that was always at our barn growing up.
                              They were all about teaching a horse everything they need to know on the ground first and then in the saddle. Almost everything a horse needs to learn to do for reining can be taught from the ground and often times they understand it better once its time to get in the saddle. I wouldn't do a lot of it at this age, but some short lessons here and there every other day are good to help build off of once he's a bit older.
                              Are you referring to long lining?

                              all of our horses are worked in harness before being introduced to saddles, makes life easier on both parties. Also use a sleigh for them to pull


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                              • Original Poster

                                #16
                                Originally posted by clanter View Post

                                Are you referring to long lining?

                                all of our horses are worked in harness before being introduced to saddles, makes life easier on both parties. Also use a sleigh for them to pull


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                                No, he'll grow up to be trained in reining, but I'm just looking for something to do while he's a yearling. Longe lining was one the suggestions we were going back and forth with.

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                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by FaithView View Post

                                  No, he'll grow up to be trained in reining, but I'm just looking for something to do while he's a yearling. Longe lining was one the suggestions we were going back and forth with.
                                  Are you intending to show in reining?

                                  If so, you may want to start reining training at two, as it is a very technical discipline best learned when young.

                                  A bit like a gymnast starts between 5 and 10, not at 20 and expect to get to be as good as those starting when their bodies and minds can grow already dedicated to learning the task they will be expected to do well later.
                                  Same with basketball, football, any specific skill that required very technical motor memory, best learned as the body and mind are still developing.

                                  That early training is invaluable if you are going to be a competitive reiner.
                                  To work under a reining trainer would be ideal.
                                  You would also learn training and riding skills that you can later apply to any and all other horses you ever are involved with.

                                  Comment

                                  • Original Poster

                                    #18
                                    Originally posted by Bluey View Post

                                    Are you intending to show in reining?

                                    If so, you may want to start reining training at two, as it is a very technical discipline best learned when young.

                                    A bit like a gymnast starts between 5 and 10, not at 20 and expect to get to be as good as those starting when their bodies and minds can grow already dedicated to learning the task they will be expected to do well later.
                                    Same with basketball, football, any specific skill that required very technical motor memory, best learned as the body and mind are still developing.

                                    That early training is invaluable if you are going to be a competitive reiner.
                                    To work under a reining trainer would be ideal.
                                    You would also learn training and riding skills that you can later apply to any and all other horses you ever are involved with.
                                    Yes, and I understand, right now he is currently 8 months old though, so I'm looking for something smaller to do with him to get him out of the barn and accustomed to an arena. I also do intend to start him early, It's why I'm leaning towards a Halter class which instead of longe lining which would be good for him since some of the stuff they do there can be applied to reining.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Originally posted by FaithView View Post

                                      Yes, and I understand, right now he is currently 8 months old though, so I'm looking for something smaller to do with him to get him out of the barn and accustomed to an arena. I also do intend to start him early, It's why I'm leaning towards a Halter class which instead of longe lining which would be good for him since some of the stuff they do there can be applied to reining.
                                      I thought you mentioned starting him at three under saddle and for reining training:

                                      Faithview

                                      Yes, I never meant under saddle. I don't plan to put one on his back until he's 3. I've trained young horses before, but usually it was just reining ground work and for small periods of time. I've never owned a colt to decide for myself what his training and competing map would look like.
                                      All he can learn before will be good for him, as you are planning.
                                      That will make him a more versatile horse when grown.

                                      Comment

                                      • Original Poster

                                        #20
                                        Originally posted by Bluey View Post

                                        I thought you mentioned starting him at three under saddle and for reining training:



                                        All he can learn before will be good for him, as you are planning.
                                        That will make him a more versatile horse when grown.
                                        Oh! i didn't understand what you meant right away. I'll be teaching him small reining movements now for shorter periods of time. Easy ones such as pivoting and responding to rein pressure. I'll build off of that more thoroughly with longer training periods when he turns around 18 months, but I don't plan to ride him until a vet clears him, which a lot of times isn't until a horse is closer to 3. Which is why I gave that estimate. I'm hoping to clear him at 2, but we'll have to see.

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