Stallion Spotlight

C-Quito1

Real Estate Spotlight

15159sunnyland18
  • Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You�re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the Forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it�details of personal disputes may be better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts, though are not legally obligated to do so, regardless of content.

Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting. Moderators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts unless they have been alerted and have determined that a post, thread or user has violated the Forums� policies. Moderators do not regularly independently monitor the Forums for such violations.

Profanity, outright vulgarity, blatant personal insults or otherwise inappropriate statements will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

Users may provide their positive or negative experiences with or opinions of companies, products, individuals, etc.; however, accounts involving allegations of criminal behavior against named individuals or companies MUST be first-hand accounts and may NOT be made anonymously.

If a situation has been reported upon by a reputable news source or addressed by law enforcement or the legal system it is open for discussion, but if an individual wants to make their own claims of criminal behavior against a named party in the course of that discussion, they too must identify themselves by first and last name and the account must be first-person.

Criminal allegations that do not satisfy these requirements, when brought to our attention, may be removed pending satisfaction of these criteria, and we reserve the right to err on the side of caution when making these determinations.

Credible threats of suicide will be reported to the police along with identifying user information at our disposal, in addition to referring the user to suicide helpline resources such as 1-800-SUICIDE or 1-800-273-TALK.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it�s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users� profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses � Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it�s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who�s selling it, it doesn�t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions � Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services � Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products � While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements � Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be �bumped� excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues � Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators� discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the �alert� button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your �Ignore� list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you�d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user�s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 5/9/18)
See more
See less

New possible project horse, need opinions

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • New possible project horse, need opinions

    I need opinion on a horse I might buy and advice. So this horse is for sale for $800 obo that is a beautiful perlino registered quarter horse. He is 5 years old and unbroke and has limited handling. When I went out to see him he was super sweet and eager to learn. He was licking and chewing and always wanted to be right next to you. He had BEAUTIFUL movement. He is registered and has great breeding. Sounds too good to be true right? Here’s the catch, he’s was just gelded a month ago. The owner told me that upfront, and he has $1500 in vet work put in to him. X rays, ultrasounds. So he’s UTD on everything and sound. But he has been separated from other horses ever since he was young because he was kept as a stud and was used to live breed three times. The person who had him before almost shot him because they were inexperienced hoSo he seems like an amazing horse but I have never been around ex studs, so my biggest concern is could he someday live safely with other horses?

  • #2
    I understand that it takes about a year for the gelding to settle into who he is going to become, and he may retain some stud behavior.

    That said, who he will be as a gelding will be dependent on who he was as a stallion.

    Some stallions live with geldings, can be stalled or even pastured in proximity to mares, can be ridden and competed in company, and are just fine.

    Some not.

    So the question I have about this horse is, what was he like as a stallion? Was he a good boy who had stupid or inexperienced owners, or was he a bad boy and a danger to.himself and everyone else?

    What experience do you have with unbroke horses, studly geldings, studs? What kind of property do you have? Do you have good strong fences so you can keep him safe but slowly introduce companions?

    Honestly from how you ask the question I suspect this horse is above your skill level. He might be a total sweety but he might also remain challenging. Remember that part of your problem will be the former idiot owners.

    I'm guessing this is a bit of a rescue situation, sellers put $1500 worth of gelding etc into him and are selling him for half that. I would leave him for a more experienced trainer who has the skills and room to deal with this.

    Comment


    • #3
      Years ago I had a 4-year-old gelded when I bought him and he has never had any issues being turned out with geldings or even mares. He wasn’t studdish to begin with though. It really depends on the horse. If you buy him, can he go in a private paddock for a bit if necessary?

      Also, do you know what was going on that he needed an ultrasound?
      Building and Managing the Small Horse Farm: http://thesmallhorsefarm.blogspot.com

      Comment

      • Original Poster

        #4
        I believe he wasn’t super study when he was intact and when I met him he did not act study at all. Yes he would be separated from other horses to begin with. Ideally I would want him to be pastured with geldings. The lady who has him said when she brought him around her other horse he reared. I believe he hasn’t been in contact with other horses besides breeding since he was a yearling. Do you think with work he could be intergrated to be with other horses?

        Comment


        • #5
          Sent
          Originally posted by megann171 View Post
          I believe he wasn’t super study when he was intact and when I met him he did not act study at all. Yes he would be separated from other horses to begin with. Ideally I would want him to be pastured with geldings. The lady who has him said when she brought him around her other horse he reared. I believe he hasn’t been in contact with other horses besides breeding since he was a yearling. Do you think with work he could be intergrated to be with other horses?
          How old are you, what experience have you had, and do you have the help of real actual adult trainers? If so what do they say?

          Have you ever worked with an unbroke horse? Have you ever handled a horse that acted up, reared, struck out, in hand?

          If this is your first or second horse, if this is a backyard on the cheap scenario, if you have little experience with unbroke horses, if its important this horse be a good citizen, then pass on this offer.

          If you are an adult, with a good trainer on board, and are willing to spend money and time with the trainer, and if you have successfully started colts with less baggage, you might be fine.

          Why are they selling him, when they aren't even making their vet costs back? I assume they bought him to keep. Why did they change their minds?

          Would you buy this horse if he was plain bay, or are you blinded by color here?

          Comment

          • Original Poster

            #6
            Originally posted by Scribbler View Post
            Sent

            How old are you, what experience have you had, and do you have the help of real actual adult trainers? If so what do they say?

            Have you ever worked with an unbroke horse? Have you ever handled a horse that acted up, reared, struck out, in hand?

            If this is your first or second horse, if this is a backyard on the cheap scenario, if you have little experience with unbroke horses, if its important this horse be a good citizen, then pass on this offer.

            If you are an adult, with a good trainer on board, and are willing to spend money and time with the trainer, and if you have successfully started colts with less baggage, you might be fine.

            Why are they selling him, when they aren't even making their vet costs back? I assume they bought him to keep. Why did they change their minds?

            Would you buy this horse if he was plain bay, or are you blinded by color here?
            I didn’t make this post to be questions on my abilities of working with horses. I am an adult. I have been riding my whole life, spent many years working under various trainers of various disciplines. I have access to many knowledgeable trainers if needed and I have worked with many problem/ green horses.

            I would buy him as a resale project.

            The horses original owner, who bought him from a good breeder, kept him as a stud. The owner died. His daughter who didn’t know about horses took him and was scared of him. Her sons were just going to shoot him because they didn’t want him. Another member in the family (the person who has him now) didn’t want him to be shot so she took him. She didnt want to keep him as a stud (he didn’t perform), so she gelded him and got him UTD. He is priced under what his vet bills costed because his is simply not worth that right now, and she understands that to be sold he has to be priced cheap.

            And no. I am not blinded by his color. Although it is pretty I could care less about a horses color. I see it as a selling factor when I resell him though, as it is a desirable color to those who like it.

            You have commented twice on this post and never offered any real help or advice. From the comments you have made I am not even sure that you have any experience working with recently gelded horses.

            Again, I did not make this post to be judged by a person behind a screen that probably doesn’t even have any experience.

            I made this post to get opinions by real horse people with real experience and unless I can get a sense that you are that from your comments, please don’t comment.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by megann171 View Post

              I didn’t make this post to be questions on my abilities of working with horses. I am an adult. I have been riding my whole life, spent many years working under various trainers of various disciplines. I have access to many knowledgeable trainers if needed and I have worked with many problem/ green horses.

              I would buy him as a resale project.

              The horses original owner, who bought him from a good breeder, kept him as a stud. The owner died. His daughter who didn’t know about horses took him and was scared of him. Her sons were just going to shoot him because they didn’t want him. Another member in the family (the person who has him now) didn’t want him to be shot so she took him. She didnt want to keep him as a stud (he didn’t perform), so she gelded him and got him UTD. He is priced under what his vet bills costed because his is simply not worth that right now, and she understands that to be sold he has to be priced cheap.

              And no. I am not blinded by his color. Although it is pretty I could care less about a horses color. I see it as a selling factor when I resell him though, as it is a desirable color to those who like it.

              You have commented twice on this post and never offered any real help or advice. From the comments you have made I am not even sure that you have any experience working with recently gelded horses.

              Again, I did not make this post to be judged by a person behind a screen that probably doesn’t even have any experience.

              I made this post to get opinions by real horse people with real experience and unless I can get a sense that you are that from your comments, please don’t comment.
              Ok, thank you for clarifying that.

              I asked because honestly we get more than enough posts from teens with big ideas and also posts from greenies who are in over their heads and in potentially dangerous situations.

              I haven't been around a gelding immediately post surgery, but I know of a number of horses that were gelded late in life, up to age 10, and are not substantially different from horses gelded at 2.

              Some of these horses were doing a job as stallions (STB harness racer, show Arab) and some were unbroke (half a dozen backyard bred WB), and a couple others I'm not sure of their whole history.

              If you have the horse skills to work with an unbroke horse, and the groundwork skills to handle a horse that may remain assertive, you should be fine.

              However, from where I am, at the low end of nice horses, late gelded horses are actually fairly common. It goes along with "fallen through the cracks horses." So I'm surprised that you haven't run across any in years of working with problem horses. Or perhaps you did, but there was no way to tell?

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by megann171 View Post
                I believe he wasn’t super study when he was intact and when I met him he did not act study at all. Yes he would be separated from other horses to begin with. Ideally I would want him to be pastured with geldings. The lady who has him said when she brought him around her other horse he reared. I believe he hasn’t been in contact with other horses besides breeding since he was a yearling. Do you think with work he could be intergrated to be with other horses?
                Sure. I had one the same age that was off the track, recently gelded, and he was fine with other geldings. Good luck with him!
                "When a true genius appears in the world, you may know him by this sign, that the dunces are all in a confederacy against him."

                Comment


                • #9
                  Question for the Mods:

                  How is this OP listed as Schoolmaster with a join date of Feb 2019 and 5 posts?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Huntin' Pony View Post
                    Question for the Mods:

                    How is this OP listed as Schoolmaster with a join date of Feb 2019 and 5 posts?
                    Good question.

                    Maybe it used the option to edit what is under your name?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I bought a horse that was gelded at 8 after being used as a breeding stallion. He was a dangerous stallion and would climb the walls at shows to try and get to the horse in the stall next to him. He was still bad for about 3-4 months after gelding. He was gelded in March I think and I bought him and turned him out with my herd (of all geldings) by February. He is super easy going. He has been around mares and could care less. I just bought another one that was a breeding stallion until he was 12 (why do I keep doing this?!?) and while he is not turned out with the herd, he is kicker and has sliding plates on, there is zero stallion behavior.

                      It can be done just take it slow, and base it off the individual horse. To me, it sounds like the horse has never had manners and is green/unhandled. You will need to evaluate your skill set and experience level so you give him a postive experience instead of making it worse.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by spotnnotfarm View Post
                        I bought a horse that was gelded at 8 after being used as a breeding stallion. He was a dangerous stallion and would climb the walls at shows to try and get to the horse in the stall next to him. He was still bad for about 3-4 months after gelding. He was gelded in March I think and I bought him and turned him out with my herd (of all geldings) by February. He is super easy going. He has been around mares and could care less. I just bought another one that was a breeding stallion until he was 12 (why do I keep doing this?!?) and while he is not turned out with the herd, he is kicker and has sliding plates on, there is zero stallion behavior.

                        It can be done just take it slow, and base it off the individual horse. To me, it sounds like the horse has never had manners and is green/unhandled. You will need to evaluate your skill set and experience level so you give him a postive experience instead of making it worse.
                        Yes, to me the risks are more about the horse being unsocialized and having had little ground handling, let alone any training. Almost feral.

                        But the worst of both worlds, because a true feral horse has grown up in a herd and really understands body language and dominance, which is a help in training him. And an unsocialized horse can miss this learning and be a bit clueless.

                        There are of course very well schooled show horses that are unsocialized with other horses and lose their minds in turnout, but they've started their human training early.

                        If he's a sweetie he may be just fine. After he heals up he could go out with some big sensible older geldings who will play a bit but keep him in line.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Huntin' Pony View Post
                          Question for the Mods:

                          How is this OP listed as Schoolmaster with a join date of Feb 2019 and 5 posts?
                          Maybe if we tag

                          Moderator 1

                          We will find the answer


                          or maybe not
                          "He's not even a good pathological liar." Mara

                          "You're just a very desperate troll, and not even a good one. You're like middle-school troll at best. Like a goblin, not even a troll." et_fig

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by KBC View Post

                            Maybe if we tag

                            Moderator 1

                            We will find the answer


                            or maybe not
                            megann171

                            I believe since the last update, all users can set their own titles. If you don't customize it, the system will use the defaults determined by post number. I'm guessing the OP self-selected "Schoolmaster." Is that correct, OP?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Pass. Perlino geldings are hard sells.
                              Only two emotions belong in the saddle: One is a sense of humor. The other is patience.

                              Comment


                              • #16

                                Originally posted by megann171 View Post
                                So he seems like an amazing horse but I have never been around ex studs, so my biggest concern is could he someday live safely with other horses?
                                It depends. But since you also say:
                                "The person who had him before almost shot him because they were inexperienced"
                                "unbroke and has limited handling"
                                "he has been separated from other horses ever since he was young"

                                .....I would be swayed to say PASS on this one.

                                In general, a stallion is going to be well-mannered if they are handled appropriately and kept appropriately. For example, a stallion that has been kept isolated for 5 years of its life might not do well as a gelding with other horses. But a stallion that has always been socialized to other horses from the beginning may transition easily as a gelding. It really just depends.

                                My cousin used to have a stud that you didn't even know he was a stud. He let me borrow him on two occasions to carry flags at an indoor rodeo (back in my rodeo queening days) and both times I stood between two mares most of the night and he didn't make one peep or one move. VERY well behaved, because my cousin made sure he was that way.

                                And then of course you hear the horror stories of stallions attacking humans because they were allowed to be that way.

                                Originally posted by megann171 View Post
                                So this horse is for sale for $800 obo that is a beautiful perlino registered quarter horse.
                                The owner told me that upfront, and he has $1500 in vet work put in to him. X rays, ultrasounds. So he’s UTD on everything and sound.
                                It also sounds strange to me that the owner has stuck $1,500 into this horse but is only selling him for $800, or best offer? (which I do see your backstory on, but it still raises some questions)

                                But why would they do x-rays? If they understand they are already taking a cut on him financially, why not let a potential buyer spend the money instead?
                                And why ultrasounds? That's not typically done in a PPE in most cases.
                                Certainly some questions to look into.

                                Originally posted by megann171 View Post
                                I believe he hasn’t been in contact with other horses besides breeding since he was a yearling. Do you think with work he could be intergrated to be with other horses?
                                It's just impossible to answer. I would say that so far the horse's history probably has not set him up to be successful as a gelding, especially since he has been kept completely out of contact from other horses.

                                Of course, if you choose to buy a "cheap" horse for $800, of course, you fully understand the risk you are taking.


                                It is not enough to know how to ride; one must know how to fall.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  The recent, late gelding is not usually much of a problem once the hormones readjust. Pretty common to wait on one that might be sold to somebody wanting a stud. The fact he’s fully grown, unsocialized and mostly unhandled is going to be your biggest challenge. As will the resale market itself, it’s a market geared towards well broke horses proven safe for most riders. The color is a niche market liked by some, not so much by many. Unless you keep him for some time, like well over a year, maybe two, to get him safely going and socialized starting from scratch? There won’t be much in there for you as a resale project, you’ll have way more in then you’ll ever get out.

                                  Horses that have socialization problems may never grow out of them and can be a PITA to find a place to board but if you keep at home, that wouldn’t be an issue.

                                  Since he’s unstarted and has little groundhandling at 5, he’s liable not to have much of a work ethic so it will probably take much longer to get him saleable. On top of that he’s a total unknown suitability wise for an Ammy rider, which is the biggest market and until he gets into regular work, you can not know his future soundness for regular work.

                                  You sound experienced enough to realize that when horses are unhandled for years past their classmates, there’s typically a reason. And it’s not what they tell you.

                                  Likewise just a reminder not to assume it’s really a registered horse until you have the papers in your hand. It may be eligible but it costs and you need the paperwork from the breeder to get it done. Typically horses that are barely halter broke at 5 also don’t have the full registration process completed. Don’t get suckered.

                                  Dont know you, your history, your skill set or your horsekeeping arrangement. Don’t be too hard on those offering advice based on theses facts and remember that if it doesn’t pertain to you, it might help somebody else, it’s not personal. We only know what you tell us.
                                  When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

                                  The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Interesting! 15K in vet work, radiographs and US for a horse to be sold for $800.

                                    Many stallions are turned out with geldings. A well mannered stallion will make a well mannered gelding.
                                    Many stallions are ridden in company with mares.

                                    You sound entirely too green to be entertaining this purchase.

                                    Again I think of bridges.
                                    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.

                                    Remember the horse does all the work, we just sit there and look pretty.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Originally posted by megann171 View Post

                                      I didn’t make this post to be questions on my abilities of working with horses. I am an adult. I have been riding my whole life, spent many years working under various trainers of various disciplines. I have access to many knowledgeable trainers if needed and I have worked with many problem/ green horses.

                                      I would buy him as a resale project.

                                      The horses original owner, who bought him from a good breeder, kept him as a stud. The owner died. His daughter who didn’t know about horses took him and was scared of him. Her sons were just going to shoot him because they didn’t want him. Another member in the family (the person who has him now) didn’t want him to be shot so she took him. She didnt want to keep him as a stud (he didn’t perform), so she gelded him and got him UTD. He is priced under what his vet bills costed because his is simply not worth that right now, and she understands that to be sold he has to be priced cheap.

                                      And no. I am not blinded by his color. Although it is pretty I could care less about a horses color. I see it as a selling factor when I resell him though, as it is a desirable color to those who like it.

                                      You have commented twice on this post and never offered any real help or advice. From the comments you have made I am not even sure that you have any experience working with recently gelded horses.

                                      Again, I did not make this post to be judged by a person behind a screen that probably doesn’t even have any experience.

                                      I made this post to get opinions by real horse people with real experience and unless I can get a sense that you are that from your comments, please don’t comment.
                                      In response to your post. My first horse was a 4-year old TB gelding. Bought from the farm where he was born, raised and bred two mares, gelded and sold to me as an unbroken 4-year old. He had always been handled properly, had no bad habits to be corrected. He was a green slate. So with good intentions I set out to train him as a pleasure horse and do competative trail riding which we did. I'been told over and over just how lucky I was the day I bought him. We had many years of pleasurable riding he keeping me safe on many occasions. He remained "study" all,his life something I got used too.. So you could have a pleasure able, and rewarding association. We certainly did.
                                      Last edited by rubles; Jun. 2, 2019, 06:46 PM. Reason: Ipad ran out of battery power

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by merrygoround View Post
                                        Interesting! 15K in vet work, radiographs and US for a horse to be sold for $800.

                                        Many stallions are turned out with geldings. A well mannered stallion will make a well mannered gelding.
                                        Many stallions are ridden in company with mares.

                                        You sound entirely too green to be entertaining this purchase.

                                        Again I think of bridges.
                                        1500 in vet work. Not 15k. Still doesn’t make sense. OP does have at least one other horse, a16.2h “grade appendix quarter horse” that’s 15 years old that she was asking questions about a few months ago. Don’t know about bridges but doesn’t sound like the project horse is a particularly good choice on top of the 15 year old she’s had for 3 years but has had some setbacks with.

                                        When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

                                        The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X