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Levels of showing

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  • Levels of showing

    Okay, so I have been around horses my entire life 30+ years and showing (locally and 4-H) and I have no idea what each level of showing really means. Non-pro, amateur (I get, not affiliated with a professional), superior, level 1,2,3. Is there a link somewhere to figure all this out? Or if someone can describe it to me in small words
    I have a long weanling that I hope to show in 2+years and I'm sure I'll need my non-pro card, just looking for some insight.

    Thank you!

  • #2
    Probably would help if you add what you are showing in, AQHA, NCHA, NRHA, SHOT, APHA ...

    Comment


    • #3
      Well, each discipline has its own framework and categories.

      In general, shows and classes can be categorized several ways.

      My examples are going to be from English competition but the same principles applies to Western, I'm sure.

      Shows can be categorized by the size of the competition area, that is local, state or provincial, regional, national. Often there is a progression where people qualify locally or regionally to participate in the national level shows.

      Classes in shows can be categorized by the level of difficulty of the task. For instance, you can have jump classes where the fences are two feet, two feet six inches, two feet nine inches, three feet, one metre, etc. Or you can do dressage level one, level two, level three, Grand Prix, etc. I think that in sports like reining, you also have different levels of difficulty.

      Classes can also be further differentiated by the age or experience of the horse and/or the rider. You can have classes for two year old horses, classes for junior riders, classes for horses that have not yet won a ribbon in the discipline or are in their first year of showing. There are clear rules in each discipline about what separates an amateur from a professional. In general, a professional is earning money giving riding lessons or training horses, and an amateur is not.

      A show can be either local or national and have all these separate classes. Obviously the competition will be stiffer at a national level especially if everyone has to qualify locally to get to the national show.

      Anyhow, you need to find the governing body that oversees the discipline that you are competing in (pleasure? reining? halter? A particular breed organization?) and download their rule book. Everything will be in there, in great detail.

      Comment

      • Original Poster

        #4
        ApHC in the future, most likely pleasure, equitation, horsemanship and showmanship. I requested my rulebook, a hard copy, just awaiting it currently. I was hoping for some laymens terms lol but thank you I will download it and read vigorously.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by HarveySpectre View Post
          Okay, so I have been around horses my entire life 30+ years and showing (locally and 4-H) and I have no idea what each level of showing really means. Non-pro, amateur (I get, not affiliated with a professional), superior, level 1,2,3. Is there a link somewhere to figure all this out? Or if someone can describe it to me in small words
          I have a long weanling that I hope to show in 2+years and I'm sure I'll need my non-pro card, just looking for some insight.

          Thank you!
          the basics are:

          Pro - professional horse train/coach, someone who makes money on/around/with horses

          Amateur - someone who does not make money (or volunteer) horses. Also cannot set courses, groom or generally do anything with a pro other than take lessons (there are exceptions for office type work but definitely check with your breed association) You may have to get a "card" from the breed association

          Open - anyone can show in the class

          Age groups are self explanatory

          Green horse/rider - first 2 years of showing for either

          Color - must show recognized color pattern


          Hope this helps.

          Comment


          • #6
            ApHC calls their amateur division "Non Pro", so open to adults who do not participate in any activities that would be considered professional for compensation. Along with that are Novice Non-Pro which is based on the points earned/show experience of the exhibitor, and Masters Non Pro which is limited to exhibitor's 50 & over.

            Level 1, 2 and 3 are associated with AQHA competition, not ApHC.
            The best little horse show series around! www.WinningWeekends.com

            Comment


            • #7
              NCHA is the only organization I know of that has both Non Pros and Amateurs. Most have one or the other and definitions vary based on the group. ApHC is easy compared to AQHA.
              Only two emotions belong in the saddle: One is a sense of humor. The other is patience.

              Comment

              • Original Poster

                #8
                Originally posted by sahqueen View Post
                ApHC calls their amateur division "Non Pro", so open to adults who do not participate in any activities that would be considered professional for compensation. Along with that are Novice Non-Pro which is based on the points earned/show experience of the exhibitor, and Masters Non Pro which is limited to exhibitor's 50 & over.

                Level 1, 2 and 3 are associated with AQHA competition, not ApHC.
                Very helpful, thank you!

                Comment

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