Stallion Spotlight

BushyGeneology copy

Real Estate Spotlight

1791 FSK
  • Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 5/9/18)
See more
See less

Rodeo pickup rider

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Rodeo pickup rider

    i've become interested in learning to be a pickup rider. Just wondering if anyone has seen/knows of female pickup riders and your thoughts on the sport?

  • #2
    Well...no, I haven't heard of any female pickup riders.

    First, a rough stock rider is going to grab a hold of you, in order to get off a bucking critter. The rider is 99.9 percent of the time, male. And he will have to reach for, and get a hold of, your body or saddle. A lot of these fellows won't be willing to do that, there being the chance of having to grab or otherwise be pretty close to female body parts that they think they shouldn't handle unless it involves a committed relationship. And sometimes they have to do what they have to do, to get themselves in a safe place.

    Some of these guys are pretty chivalrous fellows, and just wouldn't consider it, even if a woman was super capable.

    Second, picking up bronc riders well takes some Mad Skills. Of course, there are women who are capable. And you could pursue the skills to do it, and eventually achieve them.

    You would have to learn to rope, and handle rough stock. If you are starting from zero, as opposed to someone who grew up on a ranch or in a rodeo family, that's going to be a challenge. You could get a job with, or be a working student for, someone who was willing to teach you.

    So... not impossible, but probably unlikely.

    Comment


    • #3
      They are not common, but there are a few female pickup riders. Jessica Mosher is one of them (interview video here).

      But yes, you need to be able to rope (very well) and you need to be able to ride (very well), and need to be able to handle horses, cattle, and bulls (very well).

      As I posted on your other thread on the other forum, reach out to stock contractors in your area. Most are family-run but you could inquire if they need any help (starting with grudge work, of course) and if they would be willing to train you.



      It is not enough to know how to ride; one must know how to fall.

      Comment


      • #4
        Cool, I haven't ever heard of a female pickup rider in my neck of the desert but good to hear they exist.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by beau159 View Post
          They are not common, but there are a few female pickup riders. Jessica Mosher is one of them (interview video here).

          But yes, you need to be able to rope (very well) and you need to be able to ride (very well), and need to be able to handle horses, cattle, and bulls (very well).

          As I posted on your other thread on the other forum, reach out to stock contractors in your area. Most are family-run but you could inquire if they need any help (starting with grudge work, of course) and if they would be willing to train you.


          Bingo. You need to start from the ground up working around the ranch for the stock contractors. You need to learn about every aspect of the broncs and bulls and all the other stock used in Rodeos so you can learn to read them and effectively work around them safely. Probably do way more as a pick up rider then just fetch riders .
          Personally, don't see any reason you shouldn't look into it. I mean, why not?? If you want to work around livestock and the rodeo circuit, it's a thought. Go for it. Might find something else related as well.

          When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

          The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Ninjasinpajamas2 View Post
            i've become interested in learning to be a pickup rider. Just wondering if anyone has seen/knows of female pickup riders and your thoughts on the sport?
            Years ago I sold a horse to a bronc school. They didn't do any other rodeo events, just bareback and saddle bronc. Since it was a school they had horses that "bucked" the way a spoiled pony might, up to PRCA level horses, and everything in between. I remember one of the riding hands was a woman, but I think she acted more as an outrider function, using her horse to help form a chute of sorts with the catch rider's horse, get the loose horse herded into the out-going chute while the catch rider dropped off the rider and made sure he was OK, that sort of thing.

            Comment


            • #7
              OP might want to get a track card to do exercising rides at a race track, those rides can be on the same lines a pickup rider at times

              Comment

              Working...
              X