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foals personality

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  • foals personality

    I was wondering how your new born / young foals attitudes are like. Do they run to their moms when you approach them or come to you out of curiosity? How do you think this predicts there future disposition?
    Dog hair, it's whats for dinner

  • #2
    bump. I'm also curious about this.

    Mine is a little but of both. Definitely curious, comes up wants to be in my face checking me out, but can also run to mom if he's not in the mood to be messed with.

    Comment


    • #3
      Depends on what you do with them! We had one that was all about the people, then had a bit of a colic epsiode, has to get lots of meds, now is all about avoiding the people

      So personality and experience.

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      • #4
        Two of ours so far this year want nothing to do with people right now. My filly on the other hand, is all up in your face. I mean will walk 20-30 ft from mom (3 wks old) to come see people. Loves scritches (esp butt scritches), loves noogying your head, etc. She's a total ham. I love her!

        She really seems to take after mom, and I always thought mom's personality quirks were from being orphaned.


        Pictures

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        • #5
          From the moment by boy was born (he will be 2 in a few weeks) he has been all about human loving. I swear he thinks I'm his other mom. He cuddles with me all the time, is highly independent from everyone else and doesn't like to share me with others. He has been super easy going from the day he was born - hauled alone to shows all last year, stands tied at the trailer etc.
          Cloverfox Stables

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          • #6
            We had two fillys by ET, (double ovulation so same parents)...two different surrogate mares and we were afraid that the mares' personality would rub off on the foals too much. One was very friendly and one was NOT. After weaning, they have sort of traded back and forth in their affinity to human contact, depending on their recent experiences. When one needed stitches (how do they do that?)...she was less anxious to be caught and handled for a few weeks. They have now been backed and both are doing great. I would not worry about their personalities with a "snap shot"...look back over a few months time and see whether, like in a video, they adapt to their experiences and bounce back. Resilience is really an underrated trait! Breeding/genetics + experiences = personality...just like with kids.

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            • #7
              My filly, who will be 2 next week, would literally try to kill herself rather than be near humans. Her mother would try to push her towards us, and she would freak out. God forbid you got a lead rope clipped onto the halter it took 3 of us to get on her (in the stall none the less). Once she figured out there was a rope, she would rear and throw herself over backwards, all without you ever putting pressure on her face.

              At 2 months old, she just suddenly got over herself. Just overnight decided that people were good. It was very strange.

              She never had any traumatic experiences, unless you count the enema at birth and having blood drawn for IgG traumatic. She just refused to be near humans.

              At 2, she's a total pest. She still has an attitude when asked to do something she would rather not, but she loves being petted, scratched, wormed, vaccinated, blanketed, bathed, anything. Not a huge fan of having her big leg wound treated, or of having her hooves trimmed, but she tolerates it. She even loads herself onto the trailer if I leave the ramp down.

              Starting her next year is going to be interesting... She could be super easy, or it could look like a rodeo. She's currently into biting at legs, and she's lightning fast, so by the time you go to punish her she's either gone, or she's looking at you with this totally innocent expression.

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              • #8
                Only have one, so nothing to compare him to but he came to people the minute he could walk. He is very friendly but really cocky, stubborn and arrogant and he was disciplined-many, many times. I think that is just his personality.
                He is 9 months old now and is out with the big horses. I was really worried about someone being too rough with him, as he is totally in love with a grey mare who thinks he is a real Gweedo. Oddly enough I think she is getting tired of chasing him off....maybe Stud Muffin has a chance!

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                • #9
                  We had two colts out of the same mare and they were both extremely friendly from the second they came into the world, the first one in particular. He LOVES people (especially me ), and has been that way all along. Anytime he is being touched by a person is time in heaven for him. The other one was sold as a weanling, but his new owners report pretty much the same things. Another colt, out of a different mare was extremely shy all the way up until weaning. We really could barely get near him. Now, as a 3 year old, he is very, very friendly and extremely sweet. Yes, still a bit sensitive, but super sweet and friendly.

                  www.foxdalefarm.us

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                  • #10
                    We have 3-5 each year and all the mares are QUIET and friendly, but the babies seem to range. We are there at birth, but don't "imprint" them, just handle very basically. Some are skittish and some never are, but seems at about 5-6 days most of them, even the friendly ones, turn semi-feral for a for a week or two and then come back around. Then some never do and are love bugs the whole time. They are all very different but by 4-6 weeks they are usually climbing in our laps and come running when we go in the field. Sometimes if the mare is overprotective (in a motherly way) they will be shy but then once weaned are very different without mom's influence.

                    Hampton Bay, we have one that sounds very much like yours, was very distrustful even as a day old foal and with no reason to be. She is 4 now and spent a lot of time with a cowboy but she is broke and a very nice and super talented horse (AHS mare), but will always be somewhat tough. The mare's 4 other foals have been nothing like this one... all different sires.
                    Signature Sporthorses
                    www.signaturesporthorses.com

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I just love foals!

                      Our 3yo gelding was a doll baby from the get-go. Easy, easy, easy to handle and to wean. Yet this is the guy who nearly had an apoplexy when the mares walked past his stall and was more than ready to try being a stallion at 4 months old! However, FF to 3yo end of April 2010: Despite his size (16.3hh) he is kind, very gentle, laid back and loves being handled in any way. Same as he was as a baby. He has been a breeze to start u/s.

                      His paternal half-sister is 10 months old and even since birth: Shy! Very sweet but still hangs back when you visit, and prefers scritches and loves when she's ready, not you. She gets on well with everyone in the herd b/c she isn't assertive. All in all a quiet filly compared to him.

                      His maternal half-sister is also 10 months old and within 10 minutes after her birth there was no question she said out loud: "OK people, listen up. We have the milk bar on my left, and a long wall on my right. I am going to shimmy along the wall to get to the milk bar. Bar tender, stand fast. Humans, stand back, I'm getting up!" She's bold, independent, and smart as a whip. I bet April wouldn't care less if the rest of the herd went up in flames. Curious, opinionated and not a nervous hair on her head, she is still so sweet. Could be petted and loved all day. Was first to learn how to pick up her feet and lead, etc.

                      Colt, also 10 months old (by entirely different parents). Dam is herd boss and certainly friendly enough but can also be very aloof and twiggy. I don't know if it's b/c she takes her leadership so seriously! Anyways, her colt is the opposite: He's as regal as she but hasn't a shy bone in his body. Always, always, always first to come over to greet people. A wonderful attitude: Everything is his for the taking, the world is his domain and it just doesn't occur to him that he isn't the best thing, evah. He was this way from his first breath.
                      GreenGate Stables
                      http://ggstables.webs.com/

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I have had 2 of different breeds that came out very people shy and wanted nothing to do with us and would hide behind Mom. The one especially took a long time to come around to people. One is U/S and is very brave, can go out alone and loves attention. The other is a yearling and always comes to people for attention. You can take her out of the field alone. Both were fillies and both are braver than their dams. My friendliest to people is the most nervous with new things
                        Epona Farm
                        Irish Draughts and Irish Draught Sport horses

                        Join us on Facebook

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                        • #13
                          The 2 year old wasn't just shy, he was downright nasty. I mean, I have never met such a miserable little thing in my life. But the time he was 4 hours old he'd gummed, kicked, or trampled over just about everyone on the farm, including the poor vet. It really was incredible, even the mare hated him after only a few hours. Now? I couldn't beat him off me he's so lovey.

                          His half brother, on the other hand, has been a ham and loved people from the moment he came into this world. I swear he nickered on the way out. He's just the most friendly, amicable thing ever. Not very good at leading, but friendly none the less

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                          • #14
                            Out of two foals. Both full siblings. The filly came out very shy and insecure but came around with consistant handling. She is a sweet mare (5 years old now) and easy to catch and work with, but I'd say she is insecure in new places and situations. It's been slow and steady with her.

                            Her brother came out and wanted independence from the dam immediately! He was a clown. Very bold. Very active. Loved people. His dam used to get frustrated chasing after him all the time. He's the best horse I ever had. He just came out knowing how to lead, tie, stand for farrier, and be ridden! He has (knock wood) never bucked, bolted, or acted like a green horse a day in his life. My biggest challenge with him is not asking for too much too soon because he just offers so much.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by stoicfish View Post
                              Only have one, so nothing to compare him to but he came to people the minute he could walk. He is very friendly but really cocky, stubborn and arrogant and he was disciplined-many, many times. I think that is just his personality.
                              He is 9 months old now and is out with the big horses. I was really worried about someone being too rough with him, as he is totally in love with a grey mare who thinks he is a real Gweedo. Oddly enough I think she is getting tired of chasing him off....maybe Stud Muffin has a chance!
                              Sounds like my girl - same age and all! She's my first so I have nothing to compare it to. She is really smart and level headed and takes on new things extremely well. I just put her out with the big girls - one of them is mama. They remember each other, but no tight connection - more like sisters.

                              I hope her personality stays like this for good - she's such a lovebug - I just adore her.
                              "A lie doesn't become truth, wrong doesn't become right, and evil doesn't become good, just because it's accepted by a majority." Rick Warren

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                One dam, five foals, each with a unique personality, so I don't believe that the mare's personality "rubs off" on her foals. I've also seen no evidence that the foal's initial reaction to its surroundings is any indication of its personality in later life. The only thing I've noticed is that newborn fillies tend to be a bit more skittish and standoffish than newborn colts, but they usually get over it when they grow older.
                                Sentinel Hill Farm
                                Home of VDL Windsor H

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Babies!

                                  I just love the babies too!

                                  The first day we turned my filly out, she was barely 24 hours old, she left her mom and came to me when I called her. They were in the middle of about a 3 acre field and I was on the fence line just calling her. To my amazement she left her mom and came over to me on the fence line so I could rub on her. This was the moment that I didn't know was possible with horses. She is coming 3 now and to this day she is the sweetest horse I have ever known and there has never been a time she doesn't come galloping to me when I call her.

                                  Oh, the joy of having them when they hit the ground is unbelievable!!
                                  http://www.three-dayfarm.com

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by Signature View Post
                                    Hampton Bay, we have one that sounds very much like yours, was very distrustful even as a day old foal and with no reason to be. She is 4 now and spent a lot of time with a cowboy but she is broke and a very nice and super talented horse (AHS mare), but will always be somewhat tough. The mare's 4 other foals have been nothing like this one... all different sires.
                                    I fully expect this filly to be tough, and I have since I bred her mom. Her mom is a very sound, fairly talented, but very very complicated appendix QH. Dad is my dream horse, and pretty easy himself, but isn't known for calming down hot mares like some other Lusitano stallions are. My filly got her dad's movement but with more natural desire to stretch, and mom's "you better ask me nicely" personality. She's been gorgeous since birth, never an ugly day, she just has that "it" factor. She will be worth it in the end, but it's probably going to be a hard road. At least she hasn't had the history of being beaten with a whip and ridden poorly like her dam.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Originally posted by stoicfish View Post
                                      Only have one, so nothing to compare him to but he came to people the minute he could walk. He is very friendly but really cocky, stubborn and arrogant and he was disciplined-many, many times. I think that is just his personality.
                                      He is 9 months old now and is out with the big horses. I was really worried about someone being too rough with him, as he is totally in love with a grey mare who thinks he is a real Gweedo. Oddly enough I think she is getting tired of chasing him off....maybe Stud Muffin has a chance!
                                      So today I caught the Muffin mounting the grey mare...with all the parts showing intent. He came up a little short...
                                      Everyone has told me he is too young to breed, they are separated now so he and Mrs. Robbinson don't have any accidents. This is really young for this behaviour or not?
                                      He has a guest appearance this week then I will book a gelding date right after. Should I even worry about the mare and preg testing?

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        I think in Muffin's case some start earlier. Many years ago I had a 10 month old colt that I came home from work to find mounting his 1/2 sister :-O He even had ejaculate all down her sides!! Needless to say I seperated him immediately and the vet out the next week for a gelding.

                                        As far as personalities I have found it a bit of a crapshoot. I have had hot mares have SUPER quiet foals and vice versa. The only one I have that is a clone of her mom in personality (and I mean a clone! Which in this case is a good thing ;-) is my coming 3yr old Sagnol filly. They are like princesses and have so many different expressions you always know what they are thinking but in the same breath loving and bombproof. My favourite!
                                        Cindy's Warmbloods
                                        www.cindyswarmbloods.com Cindy's Warmbloods
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