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Florencio EVA status?

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  • Florencio EVA status?

    Im really ignorant on this ... I read there was some experimental treatment he was going through- does anyone know the status? Do you assume mares still need to follow EVA protocol? I read the Fidermark thread with a lot of interest and I HAD been aiming to use Fidertanz this spring with a mare that is TB/RenoirI/Graziano http://www.allbreedpedigree.com/royale+pal

    Now Im wondering if going a generation closer to Florestan would be more what I want.. bringing me to Florencio.

    What about the old guy himself?

    H
    www.windhorsefrm.org and on Facebook too!
    Where mares rule and Basset Hounds drool!

  • #2
    Still positive as far as I know. Not a big deal, just vacinate.

    Comment


    • #3
      Florencio is EVA positive and you would need to vaccinate. Not necessarily a big deal if you have your own farm but it can be a very big deal if you board. I have a fantastic Florencio filly (bred by Siegi B) and would use him again in my program.
      Roseknoll Sporthorses
      www.roseknoll.net

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      • Original Poster

        #4
        There is a quarantine for the mare with vaccination -right? Can the vaccination be done with a foal at her side? Its this whole process, and what I dont know about it, that has turned me off to getting it done.
        www.windhorsefrm.org and on Facebook too!
        Where mares rule and Basset Hounds drool!

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        • #5
          wehrlegirl - just google EVA Protocol and you will get a plethora of information. It's not rocket science but yes, there is some quarantine involved if you have pregnant mares around.

          P.S.: It's almost funny how scared some folks are when it comes to the EVA positive status..... If it didn't cost extra money I would suggest titering your mare for EVA because lots of them will test positive even without the vaccine.
          Siegi Belz
          www.stalleuropa.com
          2007 KWPN-NA Breeder of the Year
          Dutch Warmbloods Made in the U. S. A.

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          • #6
            Siegi is correct. And frankly anyone who uses frozen semen from Europe should seriously consider getting their mares vaccinated anyway.
            Roseknoll Sporthorses
            www.roseknoll.net

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            • Original Poster

              #7
              Originally posted by siegi b. View Post
              wehrlegirl - just google EVA Protocol and you will get a plethora of information. It's not rocket science but yes, there is some quarantine involved if you have pregnant mares around.

              P.S.: It's almost funny how scared some folks are when it comes to the EVA positive status..... If it didn't cost extra money I would suggest titering your mare for EVA because lots of them will test positive even without the vaccine.
              So, yes, Ive done a lot of reading and no it doesnt make me feel any more confident to try it. I do have five other pregnant mares on the farm that I do have to consider, all will be at various stages of re-breeding next year. Yeah, it does seem scary and more to the point.. is it worth it if there are other stallions I could just use instead.
              www.windhorsefrm.org and on Facebook too!
              Where mares rule and Basset Hounds drool!

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              • Original Poster

                #8
                Originally posted by YankeeLawyer View Post
                Siegi is correct. And frankly anyone who uses frozen semen from Europe should seriously consider getting their mares vaccinated anyway.
                great, I do.. has anyone here vaccinated their whole mare herd? That might take care of the quarantine issue
                www.windhorsefrm.org and on Facebook too!
                Where mares rule and Basset Hounds drool!

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                • #9
                  I vaccinated my entire herd in 1999 before I bred with imported semen for the first time. Since then when I have had fillies that need vaccinating, we just move them to a pasture across the driveway from my main pastures. Once a mare has been vaccinated, she does not need to be isolated to be boostered, If you search for discussions here, you will find a ton of information, especially posts by Equine-Reproduction.
                  Mary Lou
                  http://www.homeagainfarm.com

                  https://www.facebook.com/HomeAgainFarmHanoverians

                  Member OMGiH I loff my mares clique

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                  • #10
                    wehrlegirl - I probably wouldn't vaccinate with five pregnant mares around. Is the mare you're thinking about breeding imported? If so, I would definitely do a titer on her because chances are she's already positive for EVA, and then you won't have to worry about vaccinating.

                    I just wasn't willing to limit my choices and/or take any risks since most of the semen I use is imported, so all of my girls got the vaccine.

                    P.S.: Some vets will tell you that you have to booster for EVA every year - not necessary at all.

                    P.P.S.: My all-time favorite horses that I bred are Florencio kids - Bardot S. E., Carrera S. E., and Enrico S. E. - super types with definitely above average movement.

                    Good luck!
                    Siegi Belz
                    www.stalleuropa.com
                    2007 KWPN-NA Breeder of the Year
                    Dutch Warmbloods Made in the U. S. A.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      You can vaccinate with a foal by her side. If she is in a field with pregnant mares she needs to be seperated by few feet, a barn isle is fine for a 3 week period. The vaccine because it's a live vaccine could theoretically jump and vaccinate the horse next to her. No one has ever seen this happen but the vaccine isn't approved for pregnant mares. You shouldn't worry. Like Siegi said, there is a good chance that she would titer positive anyway. I don't pull titers because it's expensive and there is no risk to give the vaccine. Once you vacinate once you don't have to seperate the mare next time. I think it's worth it because you never know if the stallion your breeding to is positive if your using frozen semen.
                      www.grayfoxfarms.com Home of Redwine, Aloha, Federalist, Romantic Star and Rated R.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I agree, get the mare vaccinated. I eventually would like to get all mine vaccinated. Earlier this year when I vaccinated one of mine to be bred to an EVA positive stallion, I honestly just left her in with a gelding an open mare, and a 2yo filly. I had only one mare left to foal, and she was isolated. My stallion is already vaccinated (when I vaccinated him, I left him in the barn, and all the other horses stayed out. I had 4 mares left to foal at that time, all were fine). It's really no big deal, and definately worth it IMO.
                        Making Your Ambitions a Reality at Secret Ambition Stables.
                        Quality Welsh Ponies and Welsh Crosses bred for sport
                        Facebook Page.
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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by siegi b. View Post
                          wehrlegirl - I probably wouldn't vaccinate with five pregnant mares around. Is the mare you're thinking about breeding imported? If so, I would definitely do a titer on her because chances are she's already positive for EVA, and then you won't have to worry about vaccinating.
                          A mare that's imported into the US is tested for EVA at the quarantine center in the US. If positive she will have the next flight back. That's why we test them also before shipping.

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                          • #14
                            Mares are not tested for EVA at quarantine. I have a Donnerhall mare who was in foal to Florencio (therefore was positive in her EVA titer from the breeding) when she was imported in 2005. No problems at all with import.

                            I also had a mare that was vaccinated who was later exported to Finland. I had documentation of her EVA vaccination, but that was never asked for and there were no problems when she went to Europe, nor when she returned to the US last year.
                            Mary Lou
                            http://www.homeagainfarm.com

                            https://www.facebook.com/HomeAgainFarmHanoverians

                            Member OMGiH I loff my mares clique

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                            • Original Poster

                              #15
                              well. I feel a little braver. The mare is first to foal in the spring, so I could vaccinate her right after with our two yr old, and another open mare so that way the herd is done in "waves" so no one is alone. That has always been a concern too.. Mare+quarantine= barn being kicked down. Ok, deep breath, Ill do it. Thank you for all the feedback!
                              www.windhorsefrm.org and on Facebook too!
                              Where mares rule and Basset Hounds drool!

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                              • #16
                                Originally posted by YankeeLawyer View Post
                                Siegi is correct. And frankly anyone who uses frozen semen from Europe should seriously consider getting their mares vaccinated anyway.
                                Yep...

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by janderegelaar View Post
                                  A mare that's imported into the US is tested for EVA at the quarantine center in the US. If positive she will have the next flight back. That's why we test them also before shipping.
                                  HAF is correct. Mares aren't tested for an Eva titer when entering the US. Mares aren't carriers, unless they are in the acute stage and they just caught Eva from another horse which is only for about 3 weeks they can't pass it. That's why your best place to catch Eva is at a horse show where mares and geldings are brought directly from the 3 day quarantine to the show grounds, they could just have slight cold symptoms. The EVA titer doesn't mean they have Eva it means they are immune to catching Eva. Even stallions aren't tested for EVA coming into to US at many quarentine facilities. The quarantine is to test for CEM.
                                  www.grayfoxfarms.com Home of Redwine, Aloha, Federalist, Romantic Star and Rated R.

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                                  • #18
                                    Contact Jeannette Nijhof direct and she will give you all the facts on Florencio.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Originally posted by Why Me View Post
                                      Contact Jeannette Nijhof direct and she will give you all the facts on Florencio.
                                      Why? Have you that he's not eva positive? Eva is the same every where, it's not a big deal just vaccinate.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by janderegelaar View Post
                                        A mare that's imported into the US is tested for EVA at the quarantine center in the US. If positive she will have the next flight back. That's why we test them also before shipping.
                                        No. Neither mares or stallions are required to undergo EVA testing before being allowed into the US. the USA is the only one of 64 Thoroughbred racing countries world-wide that has no testing requirements or restrictions in place to prevent importation of the virus, nor does it have a national program for the prevention and control of the disease. There is "movement" going on to try and prevent the type of outbreak that occurred in the Quarter Horse industry a couple years ago, but we're not there yet. Vaccination of animals is a good way to attempt to keep an outbreak from occurring. We typically vaccinate any of our intact colts between 180 and 270 days (before puberty) in order to prevent an inadvertent exposure to an active case of the virus.

                                        wehrlegirl, there are several articles on our website about EVA, vaccination protocols and quarantine protocols. It's not difficult to do, but care must be made to avoid the inadvertent exposure of pregnant mares. They are essentially, the high risk population to exposure of EVA.

                                        The vaccine because it's a live vaccine could theoretically jump and vaccinate the horse next to her. No one has ever seen this happen but the vaccine isn't approved for pregnant mares.
                                        That's not true. There have been incidences where animals that were in contact with recently vaccinated animals (foals with their dams' for example) "have" sero-converted - which means they show they have been exposed to some form of the virus. However, there has not been an incidence where a non-vaccinated animal contracted an active case of the disease from a recently vaccinated animal.

                                        As Home Again Farm stated, it is STRONGLY recommended that before breeding ANY mare with frozen semen imported from Europe, the mare be vaccinated with EVA. While testing protocols have certainly improved, there have been incidences where mares have been exposed to EVA positive semen that was believed to have been EVA negative.

                                        With regards to the "experimental treatment", EVA is testosterone dependent. One method that has been attempted, with limited success, is through suppression of testosterone in stallions (gelding the horse will also accomplish the task ). Unfortunately, the risk of testosterone suppression is that the horse may become infertile or have a major negative impact on future fertility. So, it isn't a treatment that is undertaken lightly.

                                        Hope that clarifies a couple points anyway.
                                        Last edited by Equine Reproduction; Oct. 24, 2009, 05:12 PM.
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