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CEM Saga continues

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  • CEM Saga continues

    After realizing the ramifications of this recent outbreak and recognizing that many breeders, veterinarians and horse people just don't have time to keep up on some of the pertinent and important issues, we have initiated a newsletter. If you wish to receive a copy of our Newsletter, simply go to the main page on our website at:
    http://www.equine-reproduction.com and complete the subscription link at the top right hand side of the main page. It will have the latest updates on things like the CEM outbreak, as well as articles timely for breeding season and current research and products.

    For all of you who have sent me private emails, I apologize for not being able to respond to them all. I just literally don't have enough time in the day <groan>.

    Below is the latest news on the CEM outbreak:

    Semen Shipped to Canada from CEMO-positive Stallion in Kentucky

    CFIA (Canadian Food Inspection Agency - the Canadian equivalent of USDA) has announced that semen was shipped from one of the Kentucky-based stallions that tested positive for presence of the Contagious Equine Metritis Organism (CEMO) Taylorella equigenitalis to breed mares in Alberta and Ontario last spring. The mares have been quarantined and are undergoing testing to determine if there has been transmission of the bacteria. Although semen extenders commonly carry an antibiotic, that does not guarantee destruction of the bacteria, which could still be viable and infect the mare at the time of breeding.

    While all parties involved in this outbreak are working assiduously to regain control and achieve complete elimination of presence of the bacteria within all contact animals, there is concern that the US may lose "CEM-free" status within the International community. Such a loss would prevent the free (non-restricted) passage of semen and horses into Canada, as well as less-restrictive testing requirements for export to other countries. Horses being exported to Canada would be likely to require quarantine with extensive testing and swabbing with results negative for the presence of Taylorella equigenitalis, and in the case of stallions test-breeding of two mares while in quarantine. Semen could only be exported from stallions that were standing at quarantine facilities and that had undergone the same type of testing. CFIA's current recommendation, made in the announcement on their web site is that "Until more information is available from the U.S.... the equine industry and importers in Canada exercise caution and refrain from importing breeding horses, embryos and semen from the U.S."

    Happy New Year everyone!

    Kathy St.Martin
    Equine Reproduction Short Courses
    http://www.equine-reproduction.com
    Only 2 days left of our Holiday Enrollment Special!
    Equine-Reproduction.com Now offering one on one customized training!
    Leg-Up Equestrian Assistance Program, Inc. A 501(c)(3) non-profit charity

  • #2
    Thanks Kathy for putting in an update.

    I had posted back some time ago but people didn't seem to think it was too terribly important.

    http://chronicleforums.com/Forum/sho...d.php?t=181569

    Comment


    • #3
      Has anyone mentioned yet where they think that it has been contracted FROM? I mean, it had to come from somewhere, since this country WAS CEM free......
      Family Partners Welsh Ponies - Home of Section B Welsh stallion *Wedderlie Mardi Gras LOM/AOE http://www.welshponies.com
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      • #4
        Kathy, thanks for keeping us updated with information. Freedom, it's not that anyone is being dismissive ("people didn't seem to think it was too terribly important"), it's just that we are waiting for more information. It's certainly an important issue, but not something that we can run right out and do anything about other than to stay informed at this time.
        www.forwardfarms.com.
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        • Original Poster

          #5
          Originally posted by rideagoldenpony View Post
          Has anyone mentioned yet where they think that it has been contracted FROM? I mean, it had to come from somewhere, since this country WAS CEM free......
          I suspect they're scrambling to discover where it snuck in. There have been a couple cases in this country, but usually it was just one or two affected horses (except back in the 70's). I have no doubt that they're following the "trail" so to speak, but they're also scrambling to get it contained.

          As of last night, the OIE said the number of infected horses was up to 7 (DeGraff stables is reporting 6, but it is probably just a delay in reporting).

          Fortunately, the disease is relatively easily treated and while it is frustrating, it doesn't warrant any panic. We're keeping everyone apprised of the situation for two major reasons, one being that if you are a mare owner whose mare was bred to one of the stallions at DeGraff Farm/Liberty Stables and have not been contacted, you need to make contact with the farm and follow the necessary testing protocols. The second reason is to keep everyone apprised if any changes in the Canada/U.S. border policy in shipping semen or horses.

          Hope that helps!

          Kathy St.Martin
          Equine Reproduction Short Courses
          http://www.equine-reproduction.com
          1 day left of our Holiday Enrollment Special!
          Equine-Reproduction.com Now offering one on one customized training!
          Leg-Up Equestrian Assistance Program, Inc. A 501(c)(3) non-profit charity

          Comment


          • #6
            I have a breeding to a KY QH to use this spring. He is not in contact with that collection station or any of the mares involved. I will see how this plays out but think I will be ok. I wonder if I should ask that he be tested? Can that be done w/o the live cover breeding that the quarantine farms do for imports?
            http://TouchstoneAcres.com
            Touchstone Acres Lipizzans, Standing N. Samira VI (Gray), N. XXIX-18(Black), more in 2014

            Comment


            • #7
              Here is the latest info on the outbreak. In your professional opinions, is it safe to send a TB to KY for live cover? My gut says yes but I was wondering what other people thought.

              In December 2008, a Quarterhorse was routinely tested for export purposes for Contagious Equine Metritis (CEM). This Quarterhorse was positive to the bacterial infection which was not known to exist in the United States. To date (January 5, 2009) seven stallions are confirmed positive in Kentucky and Indiana.
              The confirmed positive horses’ names are

              -‘Potential Investment’ a 16 yr old Quarterhorse stallion located in Midway, KY

              -‘Hot Lopin Sensation’ a 4 yr old registered stallion in the American Paint Horse Association in Midway, KY

              -‘Indian Artifacts’, a 13 year old Quarterhorse stallion in Midway. KY

              -‘Repeated In Red’, a 5 year old Quarterhorse stallion in Midway, KY

              -'Zips Heaven Sent', a 10 yr Paint Horse stallion in Fort Wayne, IN

              -'Gentlemen Send Roses' 'Gus', a 9 yr Paint Horse stallion in South Bend, IN

              -‘ Invited Back’, a Paint Horse Stallion from Indiana
              McDowell Racing Stables

              Home Away From Home

              Comment

              • Original Poster

                #8
                Originally posted by Laurierace View Post
                Here is the latest info on the outbreak. In your professional opinions, is it safe to send a TB to KY for live cover? My gut says yes but I was wondering what other people thought.
                Yup. You can be sure with the outbreak, everyone will be on their toes <smile>. I suspect that there will be considerably more routine testing than there has been in the past. Of bigger concern is if the U.S. loses our CEM free status. We're trying to stay on top of that and will let breeders know if that status changes both through our website and through our newsletters.

                Kathy St.Martin
                Equine Reproduction Short Courses
                http://www.equine-reproduction.com
                Equine-Reproduction.com Now offering one on one customized training!
                Leg-Up Equestrian Assistance Program, Inc. A 501(c)(3) non-profit charity

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thank you Kathy, a reply from you was what I was most hoping to see. Its a hard decision to make money wise right now, so I wasn't sure if CEM should be adding to the difficulty or not. There is a stallion right here in MD that has caught my eye for her but I love her foal from 2008 and think I would be foolish not to send her back to him as he is getting up in age. She did not get in foal for 2009 so no foal to worry about shipping but its obviously way more expensive to send her away than trailer breed right here.
                  McDowell Racing Stables

                  Home Away From Home

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Sent to me from the Texas Animal Health Commission

                    Alert
                    Texas Animal Health Commission
                    Box l2966 * Austin, Texas 78711 * (800) 550-8242 * FAX (512) 719-0719
                    Bob Hillman, DVM * Executive Director
                    For info, contact Carla Everett, information officer, at 1-800-550-8242, ext. 710, or ceverett@tahc.state.tx.us
                    For immediately release:

                    Texas Among 27 States Testing Horses for Contagious Equine Metritis (CEM)

                    Texas is among 27 states tracing and testing horses that may have been exposed to contagious equine metritis (CEM), a highly contagious disease that can be transmitted during breeding or artificial insemination. CEM can cause temporary infertility of horses. The disease, not known to affect humans, was first detected in the U.S. in 1978, then again in l979. In both instances, the infection was eradicated.

                    In mid-December 2008, a CEM-infected quarter horse stallion was detected in Kentucky during routine testing for international semen shipment. The USDA and Kentucky animal health authorities quickly initiated an epidemiological investigation, leading to the testing of more horses. To date, seven infected stallions have been detected: four in Kentucky, and three in Indiana. The Indiana stallions had spent part of the 2008 breeding season on the Kentucky premises where the initial CEM case was detected.

                    As of January 2, 2009, 78 potentially exposed horses (nine stallions and 69 mares) in 27 states have been identified and located, and placed under hold order or quarantine by state animal health authorities, pending test results.

                    In Texas, veterinarians from the Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC), the state regulatory agency for livestock health, have contacted the owners of 14 mares and a stallion with epidemiological links to the infected horses. Testing of the 15 horses in Texas will begin the week of January 5. Currently, Texas has no known CEM infection.

                    As the epidemiological investigation widens, at least 250 additional horses are being traced in
                    more than 25 states.

                    Dr. Ellis, Texas’ assistant state veterinarian, stressed that CEM is spread by infected equine animals during breeding, not by casual contact or shared boarding facilities. CEM is a venereal
                    disease transmitted by infected stallions either during natural service or through artificial insemination.

                    CEM-infected horses must be quarantined and treated with disinfectants and antibiotics over a period of several weeks. Following a course of successful treatment and re-evaluation, the animals may be certified CEM-negative and released from quarantine.

                    --30--

                    Additional national CEM information may be obtained on the USDA's web site at http://www.aphis.usda.gov/newsroom/hot_issues/cem/index.shtml
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                    • #11
                      Of bigger concern is if the U.S. loses our CEM free status.
                      What will be require of stallion owners if we do lose our CEM free status?
                      What kind of testing is required?
                      Is there quarantine involved?
                      Is this something that will have to be done annually?
                      Is it expensive?
                      www.ChampsGuthrie.com - Brown Silver Dapple AQHA & NFQHA stallion
                      www.SilverSportHorses.com - Quality Silver Warmblood X Sport Horses

                      Comment

                      • Original Poster

                        #12
                        Originally posted by Hunt For Joy View Post
                        What will be require of stallion owners if we do lose our CEM free status?
                        What kind of testing is required?
                        Is there quarantine involved?
                        Is this something that will have to be done annually?
                        Is it expensive?
                        If we lose our CEM status, stallions that are exporting semen will more than likely be required to undergo CEM testing. Whether or not there will be quarantine involved will probably be dependent on how the USDA and Canada wish to proceed. We recommend that stallions be swabbed and cultured every year, so yes...it "is" something that should be done annually. Cost for a CEM culture through Oklahoma State is about $50.00 for each swab. That's just to grow the culture.

                        Hope that helps!

                        Kathy St.Martin
                        Equine Reproduction Short Courses
                        http://www.equine-reproduction.com
                        Equine-Reproduction.com Now offering one on one customized training!
                        Leg-Up Equestrian Assistance Program, Inc. A 501(c)(3) non-profit charity

                        Comment

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