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"Apron" face paints and crosses sometimes deaf?

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  • #21
    Originally posted by JB View Post
    Depends on what the actual cause of the deafness is. If it's due to the Splash gene limiting the pigment to the inner ear, than since it has to come from one parent or the other, that makes it genetic.
    The ability for the pattern/white to make the horse deaf is genetic i.e. splash but the actual deafness is not imo. Splash is genetic but some splashes are deaf some are not.
    Check out my Equine Genetics Blog! Updated April 25th with Splashed White!!!
    http://equinegenetics.blogspot.com/

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    • #22
      Originally posted by JWB View Post
      Not sure if it works in horses quite like it does in dogs - but for dogs, the deafness itself is not "genetic".... It's the lack of pigment inside the ear.

      Whether it's dogs or horses, why would it be okay to breed an animal specifically to be handicapped?
      Just to clarify........the lack of pigment in the ear does not cause deafness.....the genetic flaw that causes deafness is accompanied by white ears. It is not at all the same thing. If the lack of pigment that causes white ears caused deafness there would be a whole lot more deaf horses. There are tons of horses with white faces and ears that are NOT deaf.
      Providence Farm
      http://providencefarmpintos.blogspot.com/

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      • #23
        Originally posted by RiddleMeThis View Post
        The ability for the pattern/white to make the horse deaf is genetic i.e. splash but the actual deafness is not imo. Splash is genetic but some splashes are deaf some are not.
        Right - but the fact that it comes from Splash, even if it's not always present with Splash, makes it genetic. It's a bit like hip displaysia - GSDs are prone to it, but having GSD blood doesn't guarantee it, but it's still a genetic disorder.
        ______________________________
        The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET

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        • #24
          Originally posted by camohn View Post
          Just to clarify........the lack of pigment in the ear does not cause deafness.....the genetic flaw that causes deafness is accompanied by white ears. It is not at all the same thing. If the lack of pigment that causes white ears caused deafness there would be a whole lot more deaf horses. There are tons of horses with white faces and ears that are NOT deaf.
          The ears don't have to be white for the horse to be deaf, as it's the inner ear that is affected.
          ______________________________
          The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET

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          • #25
            Originally posted by JB View Post
            Right - but the fact that it comes from Splash, even if it's not always present with Splash, makes it genetic. It's a bit like hip displaysia - GSDs are prone to it, but having GSD blood doesn't guarantee it, but it's still a genetic disorder.
            Theres a genetic component to it, but not geneticall caused. At least not the way I think of it. A bit like alcoholism. The predisposition for it is there but it doesnt make you and alcoholic.
            Check out my Equine Genetics Blog! Updated April 25th with Splashed White!!!
            http://equinegenetics.blogspot.com/

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            • #26
              Originally posted by RiddleMeThis View Post
              Both of those examples are the complete opposite of everything I have ever heard from people who have had numerous deaf horses.

              Nothing bothered them, even things coming up behind them or out of the blue. Nothing in the show ring bothered them either. Even when things would accidentally get into the ring from the stands. Nothing bothered them on the trails or while working on the ranches either.

              Everyone I know that has had them said if they could they would make all of theirs deaf.
              I've heard the same thing.

              I would never purposefully breed FOR deafness, but I would have no qualms about owning a deaf horse and breeding that horse if it proved worthy of reproducing.
              We are all inclined to judge ourselves by our ideals; others, by their acts. ~Harold Nicolson

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              • #27
                I know of a Col. Spanish horse...pure white...that was deaf...or at least his owner believe he was. He was not tested. He was as calm and easy going as you'd imagine too. He is out of the white mare that I own who since I've had her, has not produced any more apparently deaf foals.

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                • #28
                  I would never purposefully breed FOR deafness, but I would have no qualms about owning a deaf horse and breeding that horse if it proved worthy of reproducing.
                  *I* said the exact same thing, until I owned one ...

                  I had every intention of breeding this mare myself and thought that if all of her foals DID turn out deaf, I wouldnt have a problem selling them.

                  WRONGO ...

                  I had literally "0" enquiries on her in utero foals and of those people that DID enquire, the first question asked was what the odds were of her foals being born deaf and everyone then indicated that if the foal was deaf, they had "0" interest in dealing with it and owning it

                  Out of curiosity, have you owned or dealt with a deaf horse before or are you just going by what you heard from someone else?
                  www.TrueColoursFarm.com
                  www.truecoloursproducts.com

                  True Colours Farm on Facebook

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                  • #29
                    Ive worked with a few. From one of the people I was talking about earlier. Nothing phased her at all.
                    Check out my Equine Genetics Blog! Updated April 25th with Splashed White!!!
                    http://equinegenetics.blogspot.com/

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                    • #30
                      Originally posted by TrueColours View Post

                      Out of curiosity, have you owned or dealt with a deaf horse before or are you just going by what you heard from someone else?
                      One of my best friends from high school use to own a deaf grade gelding. We lived about a mile and a half from each other. She would ride towards my house and I would ride towards hers. We'd meet somewhere in the middle and trail ride once or twice a week when the weather was nice.

                      I rode with her for months before she told me Domino was deaf. I had absolutely no clue. He was an excellent trail horse and never gave her any problems.

                      There are thousands of hearing horses with behavioral issues too. You have to wonder what part of your mare's problems were attributable to her being deaf and what portion were attributable to environmental or genetic factors. If you didn't raise the horse yourself and if you weren't really familiar with her parents' personalities and dispositions then there really isn't any way to know.
                      We are all inclined to judge ourselves by our ideals; others, by their acts. ~Harold Nicolson

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                      • #31
                        The mare appears deaf..the colt I am not sure about. They are TB.


                        www.australiancolouredperformancehorses.com.au

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                        • #32
                          What do you mean the mare "appears" deaf? You can't tell from looking.
                          ______________________________
                          The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET

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                          • #33
                            Pretty sure she means she acts like shes deaf.
                            Check out my Equine Genetics Blog! Updated April 25th with Splashed White!!!
                            http://equinegenetics.blogspot.com/

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                            • #34
                              you can actually tell from looking..but yes, I meant seems deaf.
                              Deaf horses ears are set at a slightly different angle, almost 'lower' than usuall, and obviously the ear is far less 'radar' like in its movement.
                              www.australiancolouredperformancehorses.com.au

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