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Planning a trip to Germany to see stallions in person

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  • Planning a trip to Germany to see stallions in person

    I am thinking of taking a trip to Germany in order to see in person, some of these lovely stallions that are available by frozen semen in Germany. Can anyone advise me on how to start planning this trip? When do the major stallion owners have their stallion showcases? How do I get tickets? Are stallion owners usually willing to show their stallions to a measly small time breeder from Canada? I am breeding Oldenburg and Hanoverians, so I would love to see the stallions of Celle and Paul Schockemohle.
    I will be off work from mid January until the end of March, so would need to go sometime then. Any advice appreciated.
    www.saraalberni.com

  • #2
    You are in luck with your vacation time. Here is the schedule for 2011 Stallion Shows in Vechta (Oldenburg):

    Saturday, Feb. 5 - Sprehe I
    Sunday, Feb. 6 - Paul Schockemöhle I
    Saturday, Feb. 12 - Gerd Sosath
    Sunday, Feb. 13 - Paul Schockemöhle II
    Saturday, Feb. 19 - Ludwig Kathmann, Blue Hors, Josef Kathmann
    Sunday, Feb. 20 - Ahlers, Dressurpf. Leistungsz., Gestüt Wiesenhof, Jens Meyer
    Saturday, March 5 - Böckmann
    Sunday, March 6 - Sprehe II

    Saturday shows usually start around 6:30 pm or so, Sunday shows start at 2 pm. Admission each day is 8 Euros, except for the Schockemöhle shows, which are 15 Euros. Schockemöhle used to feature the jumping stallions at one show, and dressage stallions at the other show - not sure if that is still the protocol.

    Tickets can be procured through Nordwest Ticket - http://www.nordwest-ticket-server.de...hp3?shopid=176 .

    Comment


    • #3
      I believe that Celle is presenting their stallions at the horse show being held in Verden the last week / weekend in January. One of my mares is competing there and I plan to go.
      Roseknoll Sporthorses
      www.roseknoll.net

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      • #4
        When my husband and I were in Germany, we just showed up at the state stud in Celle and were invited in to tour the stallions in the barns and watch the ones that were out being exercised for the morning. A wonderful experience!
        Sentinel Hill Farm
        Home of VDL Windsor H

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        • #5
          Talk to Donella. She went for a stallion-viewing trip in Oct 08.
          Member OMGiH I loff my mares clique!!!

          Comment


          • #6
            I just went in Sept - October. I was lucky in that it was Auction time, so there were many, many riding horses with their pedigrees on the stalls. It was fun, we took the train in from Berlin to the Hannover Hbf & picked up a rental car. Then drove, and drove I have some German contacts so we were able to visit the 'farmers' as well, great time & such wonderful discussions about breeding. I went with the SO, it wasn't a horse trip at all - just a 'holiday,' but he enjoyed renting a fast car & driving on the Autobahn. The Germans are very nice people, as well.

            Visiting PS's was interesting. Do you ride as well? There will be hundreds of horses in action, and its easy to figure out who they are. In general (not just PS), its interesting to see how they prep auction horses & train youngsters. Not sure it'd 'fly' here in the US, and considering they do have success over there, it made me think we might be too easy on our younsters? But I doubt we breed in such numbers, and what do we do with our culled/broken-down stock here in the US? Can see how it works in the business model there, not sure how it'd be received over here Not even sure what they do with all of there culled stock, though I was told export was common

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            • #7
              Here is a link to the show in Verden in late January.

              http://verdinale.de-zign.de/

              My German is not hot but I think that Celle's stallion show is January 27, 2011 there:

              http://verdinale.de-zign.de/index.ph...d=53&Itemid=50

              My 4 year old Hotline x Londonderry will be competing at the show also.
              Roseknoll Sporthorses
              www.roseknoll.net

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by goodmorning View Post
                In general (not just PS), its interesting to see how they prep auction horses & train youngsters. Not sure it'd 'fly' here in the US, and considering they do have success over there, it made me think we might be too easy on our younsters? But I doubt we breed in such numbers, and what do we do with our culled/broken-down stock here in the US? Can see how it works in the business model there, not sure how it'd be received over here Not even sure what they do with all of there culled stock, though I was told export was common
                In my opinion, we do not have enough skilled young horse starters to make their model work here. It is hard enough to find someone who can train a well-handled youngster that is a good citizen, let alone a semi-feral 3 year old and expect that person to get it going solid WTC and be prepared for an MPT in 90 days or so as they routinely do in Germany.
                Roseknoll Sporthorses
                www.roseknoll.net

                Comment


                • #9
                  If you don't have time to stay forever I'd say you'll get the best price-performance ration and time-efficacy at one of the bigger shows e.g. the Verden private stallion show or even Münster-Handorf private stallion show because you get to see a variety of stallions from many different stations.
                  Also I'd adjust my visiting tactics to the expectations. If you want perfect entertainment and a fun event you definitely want to do one of the Schockemöhle presentations. If the focus is on actually evaluating stallions you consider using, I'd stick to the less drilled and restricted events where you can see the stallions during warmup and in the stables as well. This is possible at the Verden private stallion show and the Münster-Handorf private one as well.
                  Ideally I would set up an appointment to see the stallions in training with stations standing stallions you're interested in. Don't be afraid. Most stallion ownerships are nice to deal with and will be happy to show off their farms and stallions to you. Being from overseas is a definite plus. The semen market over here is extremely competitive and any stallion owner is interested to expanding their client base. Only thing that might get in your way could be a language problem especially if you want to explore the lesser exposed and smaller places.
                  Celle is always worth a visit but bear in mind they have a regulated work schedule so sticking to weekdays is a good idea
                  Have fun! Maybe we'll meet at one or the other presentation? I'm planning to do a lot of stallion screening this year. As far as tickets go there is a central ticket hotline for Vechta. The Verden private stallion show tickets can be ordered by telephone but then must be paid beforehand.
                  Feel free to email me with a list of the events you are considering. If I have any leftover tickets I'll be happy to hook up!
                  Froh zu sein bedarf es wenig...
                  http://www.germanhorseconnection.com
                  https://www.facebook.com/pages/Germa...m/237648984580

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    not sure if these are the horses you'd like to see, but the timing certainly works....

                    Parade of the Holsteiner Sires and Holsteiner Day of Sale
                    February 5th & 6th, 2011 in Neumünster

                    www.holsteiner-verband.de
                    Hidden Pearl Farm

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                    • #11
                      Pretty certain the tickets all sold out for the PS stallion shows, the Totilas factor!
                      If you do want to come and see the stallions in the flesh then email or phone Christoph Hinkel at PS and he will arrange something for you. I have shown a few overseas vistors round before, so would be happy to do so again if you wanted to PM me.
                      www.volatis.co.uk - breeders of quality and colour

                      Comment

                      • Original Poster

                        #12
                        Wow, thanks for all the info everyone. I am a dressage rider and am really just starting my breeding program, so I think I could benefit a lot from seeing how things are done in Europe. My German used to be very good, but haven't had a chance to practice in the last 9 years. Hopefully it will come back!
                        The stallions I really want to see are Sir Donnerhall (considering him this year for EM Diotima), Belissimo M (have a 2010 filly by him and am considering him for SPS Wallis this year) and Weltmeyer (I just love him and want to give him a kiss on the nose. Do you think Celle would let me do that?)
                        If possible, it would be great to attend an auction as well. I wouldn't be buying anything, but I would like to see what the fuss is all about.
                        www.saraalberni.com

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I went in 08 in October to the Han licensing and spent two weeks looking at stallions. There weren't many stallion shows on at that time but we just toured around to the major stations. I had emailed them all previously and they all seemed very welcoming. Most of them showed us the stallions in their stalls and some even rode them for us (like Andreas Dibowski and Mighty Magic). Sprehe was the only one that was less than welcoming. They acted as if we were wasting their time and they refused to allow their stallions to be photographed ( I remember you had asked me to check out Swarovski ..but they wouldn't let me take a pic). Celle was a fav place, lots of "legends" to see (including Weltmeyer).

                          Have fun!!! (and take lots of pics!).
                          www.svhanoverians.com

                          "Simple: Breeding,Training, Riding". Wolfram Wittig.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I spent a long time giving Weltmeyer scritches the last time I went to Celle. I adore that horse and am trying to work out if I breed one of my girls to him next season (problem is I will want to keep it and I have promised OH that all foals will be for sale next time)
                            www.volatis.co.uk - breeders of quality and colour

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by YankeeLawyer View Post
                              In my opinion, we do not have enough skilled young horse starters to make their model work here. It is hard enough to find someone who can train a well-handled youngster that is a good citizen, let alone a semi-feral 3 year old and expect that person to get it going solid WTC and be prepared for an MPT in 90 days or so as they routinely do in Germany.
                              This I would agree with. Riding in Germany is a serious business and most of their "average" amateur riders are of better abilities that the majority of our amateurs - because those amateurs have been immersed in a culture that we do not have here. In Canada and the US, riding horses is merely a hobby and for the general population, the minority of individuals who ride. In Europe, riding horses is serious business and the majority of the population are involved in some way, shape or form. Completely different mindset over there as well. The quality of competition over there also far exceeds what we have here. Our various zones/regions have 1, maybe 2 FEI type competitions, whereas every competition in Europe handles high-level FEI attended by a huge number of extremely high-level calibre riders so the competition is extremely fierce. If you win over there, you've really managed to do something extra special. And, those shows are well funded, because they are attended by very large crowds most of whom are very knowledgable horse people. The large auctions and stallion and mare/foal shows are attended by vast numbers of the populous over there and all of whom are very knowledgable. They know an extremely good horse when they see one and that is why sometimes when you see videos of horses being shown over in Europe, it is just as equally important to watch the faces of the audience. A horse that captivates the audience is one that every North American should take a very, very close look at.

                              It is the quality and degree of competitions over in Europe that draws all of our major FEI hopefuls to Europe because they just can't get what they need often enough. Not only that, North America is a very big place and to attend a lot of shows requires a lot of expensive travel with horses via trains, planes and horse trailers. In Europe, you can visit 4 different countries in 4 travel days.

                              Europe doesn't have the vast expanses of fields for their farms, but they make very good use of the space they have and the calibre they turn out is very impressive.

                              They are also serious about culling. Not all culls are sold to other countries. Many of them are sent to meat as horsemeat is a dietary staple in a lot of countries. As I said, they have a whole different perspective regarding horses than we do in North America and a lot of that is also due to the extreme hardships that Europeans have faced in the last 100-200 years. Those hardships change cultures and those changes stick around even in easier times.

                              You've been given great ideas for various places to visit. Enjoy your visit, takes lots of notes and pictures, have fun, and please share when you return!!
                              Practice! Patience! Persistence!
                              http://www.mariposasporthorses.com/
                              https://www.facebook.com/MariposaSportHorses/

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                A trip like this is on my some day list.

                                I often wonder that some enterprising Europeans don't set up Stallion Tours for North American breeders. It would be great to be able to visit stallions with likeminded people who will want to do and see the same things. If I go with my husband it would be fun but he does have his horsey limit!

                                Or the N.American arm of a European registry...set up a tour to Oldenburg or Hannover etc.

                                Maybe I will e-mail that suggestion to the CWHBA?

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by Mozart View Post
                                  A trip like this is on my some day list.

                                  I often wonder that some enterprising Europeans don't set up Stallion Tours for North American breeders. It would be great to be able to visit stallions with likeminded people who will want to do and see the same things. If I go with my husband it would be fun but he does have his horsey limit!

                                  Or the N.American arm of a European registry...set up a tour to Oldenburg or Hannover etc.

                                  Maybe I will e-mail that suggestion to the CWHBA?
                                  There are also equestrian holiday tour companies that could put something nice together.
                                  Roseknoll Sporthorses
                                  www.roseknoll.net

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by rodawn View Post
                                    This I would agree with. Riding in Germany is a serious business and most of their "average" amateur riders are of better abilities that the majority of our amateurs - because those amateurs have been immersed in a culture that we do not have here.
                                    I was just wondering, could this be elaborated upon? I'm not attempting to be confrontational in the least. I'm just curious as to what is meant, specifically, by "a culture that we do not have here."

                                    Originally posted by rodawn View Post
                                    In Europe, riding horses is serious business and the majority of the population are involved in some way, shape or form.
                                    Is this really true? Or does it simply appear this way because the people who are involved in the horse business can attend more events due to the fact that everything is not more than several hours drive? I'd be curious to know specific stats on the percentages of people involved in the horse biz in Europe, if such stats exist.

                                    Originally posted by rodawn View Post
                                    The large auctions and stallion and mare/foal shows are attended by vast numbers of the populous over there....
                                    Really? I mean REALLY? My husband knows and works with many, many German people who are involved in another big business over there -- beer! He has traveled there many times. I asked him, and not even one of his German friends or colleagues has ever mentioned horses to him.

                                    Originally posted by rodawn View Post
                                    North America is a very big place and to attend a lot of shows requires a lot of expensive travel with horses via trains, planes and horse trailers. In Europe, you can visit 4 different countries in 4 travel days.
                                    I think THIS has MUCH more to do with it!!

                                    Originally posted by rodawn View Post
                                    They are also serious about culling. Not all culls are sold to other countries. Many of them are sent to meat as horsemeat is a dietary staple in a lot of countries.
                                    REALLY? Seriously, is this true? If so, it has to be a huge contributing factor as to why German breeders can afford to cull so aggressively. This is obviously not an option for American breeders. And I'm massively doubtful that any decent American breeder would even want that option.

                                    Carry on!!

                                    And Merry Christmas to all!!
                                    www.sauconycreeksporthorses.com
                                    Dedicated to breeding Friesian Sporthorses
                                    with world class pedigrees and sport suitability

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      I have no idea where RODAWN gets his or her information but I can definitely rebute much of what is stated about the European market.

                                      No even HALF of the population is involved with horses.
                                      The Sales, Auctions and Events are populated by 'horsey' people and interested public, not the hordes described.

                                      Considering the price of a pound of horse meat it would be very very unprofitable for any Stud or horse breeder to cull there youngstock to the meat industry! It is done by Haflinger en Belgian breeders ... but this is due to over-breeding and hence over population. It is unheard of by warmblood breeders. I am not stating it isn't done but very much hush hush and under the radar as it would cause an outcry, even here in Europe.

                                      I cannot comment on the standard of 'amateurs' in the U.S.A. as I have no knowlegde of it and cannot therefore do a comparison.
                                      Pure amateurs are recreational riders, and in any country the level of ability in this group varies greatly, and then you have the 'professionals' that are involved in training horses and riding them for the competitive riders. No way can this later group be called 'amateur'.

                                      If you have the time a Stud I can recommend for a visit is Gestuet Tannenhof. They have an impressive group of stallions and welcome visitors.
                                      Some of the stallions in residence: http://www.gestuet-tannenhof.com/cms...3&changelang=2
                                      Peterina S.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        I've seen a few Berieters that I was far from impressed with so it probably goes without saying that they have their fair share of poor ammies. But yes, overall, the quality of horse and rider is obviously better.
                                        www.svhanoverians.com

                                        "Simple: Breeding,Training, Riding". Wolfram Wittig.

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