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Connemara and Connemara Crosses

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  • Connemara and Connemara Crosses

    Hope I am posting this in the correct place. My sister and I are both looking for a horse for both of us to bring along. We both have our been there done that horses, but we would like a project horse that we can work with together. My trainer wants us to go look at a TBXConnemara cross. The mare is 2 about to turn 3. We will go look at her November 15th. It will be a long drive for us so I want to be prepared. What are these crosses like? The only pony I've ridden was a welsh pony when I was learning to ride. It has been quite a while since I have been around another one. My current gelding is a TB so Im pretty fond of them. I know from what research I have done that there height can vary. I'm 5"3, sister a little taller. We arn't too worried about the size. Anyone here have Connemara's or Connemara crosses and want to share photo's? I would love to see other ponies and crosses. Stories, thoughts they would like to share. I would Very much appreciate it!

  • #2
    Good luck with your horse search. I have a 4yr old TBXConnemara mare who I absolutely adore. She is about 15.3hh, may end up 16h if I'm lucky. She is VERY compact. I've had her since she was a 2yr old. I started her with the help of my trainer and she is the easiest thing to work with. She has given me nothing but her absolute best. My trainer and I joke that we could shoot her with a bullet and it would bounce off of her. She is a hardy little thing. Very personable and VERY smart. That's probably her biggest draw back. We have to out think her before she out thinks us. She has been jumping a little more lately. Just for the fun of it we asked her for a bit more the other day and I swear I could put the jump higher and higher and it wouldn't faze her. We've had a hard time keeping weight off of her. When I bought her she was over weight and she is finally at a weight I like. I am sure that will be a constant battle. She has a HUGE stride on her compared to how compact she is. Here are some pictures of her. Please keep us updated on your horse search.
    here she is as a 2yr old
    http://i83.photobucket.com/albums/j3...nwbutters4.jpg
    http://i83.photobucket.com/albums/j3...m/siggypoc.jpg
    3 yr old
    http://i83.photobucket.com/albums/j3...1_0069-1-2.jpg
    http://i83.photobucket.com/albums/j3...bu/resize5.jpg
    And 4ry old
    http://i83.photobucket.com/albums/j3...om/siggyeq.jpg

    http://i83.photobucket.com/albums/j3...ling/Mal26.jpg
    This is about as wild as she gets
    http://i83.photobucket.com/albums/j308/VodkasMom/m1.jpg

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    • #3
      Connemaras are wonderful. By and far they are extremely athletic and hardy. Very good temperaments - very people orientated and willing to please. Mine are all pocket-ponies and come running when they see me.

      SMART.

      Very smart.

      It's not uncommon to hear about a Connemara who has outsmarted their owner. They thrive on learning new things - and learn very, very quickly. That can sometimes be a bad thing as it leads the person to think the pony knows more than it is trained for and ends up with the pony being pushed before its ready.

      Great jumpers. Very good dressage ponies. Their forte is eventing. Great all-arounders and jacks of all trades. The motto in the US is 'Connemaras Do It All' and it's proven very accurate.

      My family has had and bred Connemaras since 1961, I won't ever have any other type of pony. My Grandfather originally got into them because he wanted something sensible that the entire family could handle - not too big either. After our first stallion, he would never entertain the thought of another type of horse. It's a family love affair now 3 generations long.

      The Connemara/TB cross is a VERY popular one. It gives a touch more athleticism and height with the pony sensibility. They are especially good eventers and jumpers.
      *The Quietman ~ Irish Approved Gr.1 Stallion
      www.windyislesfarms.com
      Like Us on Facebook

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      • #4
        A lot depends on the breeding though. Who is the Connemara sire of the mare you're going to look at? Some of them are hotter than others. But they are lovely, hardy sensible horses for the most part. I just bought a 2 yo Connemara X (his dam was a paint, which means QH/TB) and he is very sensible and kind. He has beautiful gaits and he's fallen in love with my four year old daughter.

        Great horses.
        ==================
        Somehow my inner ten year old seems to have stolen my chequebook!

        http://reriderandpony.blogspot.com/

        Comment


        • #5
          I've bred Connemara crosses for almost 20 years now and love them. I'm on the smaller side (5') myself so was trying for something smaller than my warmbloods. There are a number of the crossbreds shown on my website, from small ponies to warmblood x Connnemara crosses.

          I've always been very pleased with both the purebreds and the crossbreds as far as disposition, trainability and work ethic. They like having a job and are very willing, though smart enough to want to keep themselves out of trouble. Some can be fairly opinionated, tend to believe they know more about things than the rider, but I don't know that they aren't right about it.

          My foundation purebred mare was a wonderful mare, loved kids and would take care of any kid you put on her. They couldn't get her to do anything that was likely to get them into trouble and she could actually stay under a child better than any horse or pony I've ever seen. However, an adult rider was a complete other story ... taking care of an adult rider was not in her job description and if you couldn't ride well and didn't pay absolute attention to what you were doing, you could find yourself seated on the ground.
          Kaleidoscope Farm
          http://www.stallionstation.com/kaleidoscopefarm

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          • #6
            I've had several

            Originally posted by Sassenach View Post
            Connemaras are wonderful. By and far they are extremely athletic and hardy. Very good temperaments - very people orientated and willing to please. Mine are all pocket-ponies and come running when they see me.

            SMART.

            Very smart.

            It's not uncommon to hear about a Connemara who has outsmarted their owner. They thrive on learning new things - and learn very, very quickly. That can sometimes be a bad thing as it leads the person to think the pony knows more than it is trained for and ends up with the pony being pushed before its ready.

            Great jumpers. Very good dressage ponies. Their forte is eventing. Great all-arounders and jacks of all trades. The motto in the US is 'Connemaras Do It All' and it's proven very accurate.

            My family has had and bred Connemaras since 1961, I won't ever have any other type of pony. My Grandfather originally got into them because he wanted something sensible that the entire family could handle - not too big either. After our first stallion, he would never entertain the thought of another type of horse. It's a family love affair now 3 generations long.

            The Connemara/TB cross is a VERY popular one. It gives a touch more athleticism and height with the pony sensibility. They are especially good eventers and jumpers.
            This. They learn the bad as quickly as the good and they DO NOT FORGET

            I have one ConnxTB whose breeding is about as good as it gets for eventing but somewhere along the way was pushed over the edge and there are things that she simply declines to do.

            However they also retain their training. You can not school for a week and pick right up where you left off. Once they have something, it's always there.

            I have been crossing them with Irish Draughts
            I wasn't always a Smurf
            Penmerryl's Sophie RIDSH
            "I ain't as good as I once was but I'm as good once as I ever was"
            The ignore list is my friend. It takes 2 to argue.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Chaila View Post
              A lot depends on the breeding though. Who is the Connemara sire of the mare you're going to look at? Some of them are hotter than others. But they are lovely, hardy sensible horses for the most part.
              I would say this, only because it has shocked not only me but some of my real life friends that I am now the owner of a Connemara after not liking nor wanting one for a long time. Most of the ones I had come into contact with were TB crosses, and very opinionated and hot, so I had just assumed that's how they were. I recently bought a 3 year old purebred filly and she is wicked smart, and definitely is a real thinker, but her temperament is one of the best I have ever been around. She will definitely be a bit of a spitfire I think, but level headed and trustworthy.

              An interesting breed that is for sure, I could not be any happier with my decision so far. But, I have seen some TB crosses I would not want to own.
              On the Internet, nobody knows you're a dog

              Comment


              • #8
                Since you are researching.... this may help... October sale of Connemaras that just ended at Clifden, from the heart of Connemara. Oct 21-25.

                Over the next days I expect there will be a posting of results in prices and you can see a huge selection of connemaras and connemara x's being offered directly from the heart of the area where they originate. This can give you indications on their market pricing as a indication of how that is affected by our current economy, and how prices become escalated when purchasing privately...taking into consideration of course that if you buy here, you have importation costs and red tape added.

                http://www.connemaraponysales.com/sa....asp?SaleID=28

                Upon further checking I think all you will find is the actual listing at this point.

                The August Sale may have more pricing and result information.

                http://ashbrookstud.ie/august-clifden-sales-report/
                http://regcorkumlive.blogspot.com/

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Perfect Pony View Post
                  I would say this, only because it has shocked not only me but some of my real life friends that I am now the owner of a Connemara after not liking nor wanting one for a long time. Most of the ones I had come into contact with were TB crosses, and very opinionated and hot, so I had just assumed that's how they were. I recently bought a 3 year old purebred filly and she is wicked smart, and definitely is a real thinker, but her temperament is one of the best I have ever been around. She will definitely be a bit of a spitfire I think, but level headed and trustworthy.

                  An interesting breed that is for sure, I could not be any happier with my decision so far. But, I have seen some TB crosses I would not want to own.
                  The basis of the breed in the United States has a higher percentage of thoroughbred than you will (generally) find in the Imported ponies. Most of the foundation breeding in the States came from Connemara/Thoroughbred crosses (at the time Thoroughbred and other outside blood was being introduced to the studbook in Ireland) and then compounded upon in further breeding along the generations. Some American lines can be a tad hot - athletic as all get out - but hot.

                  So it could have been a contribution on both ends - the Connemara and Thoroughbred parent.

                  That being said the true-to-the-breed temperament (and I'm quoting from the Irish studbook) is mannerly and tractable and very good natured. Connemaras are people-ponies and they tend to develop bonds with those who interact with them.

                  Opinionated? Yes some can be. You have to work with them at times - or make them think that it's their idea. It all goes back to them being so very smart and sometimes outsmarting their owners.

                  They love variety and new things and new challenges which is probably where the 'do it all' comes into effect.
                  *The Quietman ~ Irish Approved Gr.1 Stallion
                  www.windyislesfarms.com
                  Like Us on Facebook

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Sassenach View Post
                    That being said the true-to-the-breed temperament (and I'm quoting from the Irish studbook) is mannerly and tractable and very good natured. Connemaras are people-ponies and they tend to develop bonds with those who interact with them.

                    Opinionated? Yes some can be. You have to work with them at times - or make them think that it's their idea. It all goes back to them being so very smart and sometimes outsmarting their owners.

                    They love variety and new things and new challenges which is probably where the 'do it all' comes into effect.
                    Well that is my pony to a T. The vet that did her PPE thought she was a really cool pony. His comment about her personality was "I think if you ask this pony in the "right" way, she will do anything for you". I never thought I would find a more inquisitive and adventurous horse/pony than my mare, but the Connemara has her beat by a mile. As an example I ground drove her last night around the 80 acre property I board on. When she saw a herd of deer in the bushes she picked up the trot and nearly drug me to them. I show her something once and that's that.

                    I bought her as an inexpensive project to play with for a while, but she has turned me into a huge Connemara fan.
                    On the Internet, nobody knows you're a dog

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Wayward half Connemara mares

                      Originally posted by Sassenach View Post
                      The basis of the breed in the United States has a higher percentage of thoroughbred than you will (generally) find in the Imported ponies. Most of the foundation breeding in the States came from Connemara/Thoroughbred crosses (at the time Thoroughbred and other outside blood was being introduced to the studbook in Ireland) and then compounded upon in further breeding along the generations. Some American lines can be a tad hot - athletic as all get out - but hot.

                      So it could have been a contribution on both ends - the Connemara and Thoroughbred parent.

                      That being said the true-to-the-breed temperament (and I'm quoting from the Irish studbook) is mannerly and tractable and very good natured. Connemaras are people-ponies and they tend to develop bonds with those who interact with them.

                      Opinionated? Yes some can be. You have to work with them at times - or make them think that it's their idea. It all goes back to them being so very smart and sometimes outsmarting their owners.

                      They love variety and new things and new challenges which is probably where the 'do it all' comes into effect.
                      The two mares I am thinking about are well more than 1/2 TB but I attribute their issues more to bad training than to breeding. I've always thought Connemaras have a strong sense of justice and self preservation.

                      One of my mares in particular has a very famous full sister and I suspect along the way she was expected to just be like her big sister without being trained like her big sister.

                      The other mare was a lightly handled 3 YO who was shipped, possibly in foal about 1000 miles or so and put into a round pen where a "trainer" evidently tried to corner her. The filly paniced and bolted OVER the trainer.
                      I wasn't always a Smurf
                      Penmerryl's Sophie RIDSH
                      "I ain't as good as I once was but I'm as good once as I ever was"
                      The ignore list is my friend. It takes 2 to argue.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        You're headed in the right direction

                        Connemaras and half-bred Connemaras are very well suited for eventing, although many also excel in dressage, driving, jumpers, hunters and foxhunting.

                        I compete mine in eventing, and foxhunt them. My two half-breds are by *Grange Finn Sparrow, and o/o a TB mare, and an appendix mare (so they're half siblings). Both are sensitive, but super willing to please and extremely athletic. My two purebreds are a bit more mellow.

                        http://www.brambleridgefarm.com/owen.html

                        I have some friends that have a number of Conn/TB crosses for sale, they're very tractable and kind ponies. They have a really nice 3 y/o going under saddle and a gorgeous 2 y/o. Check out Rivendell Farm on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#!/...24787144212854

                        Just for kicks, this is a purebred Connemara gelding competing successfully at Intermediate, and with Advanced on the horizion: http://www.facebook.com/#!/album.php...d=169316126891 If it doesn't come up, search Wil'Ya Love Me.
                        Fade to Grey Farm
                        Eventing, Foxhunting & Connemaras
                        *NEW* website:www.fadetogreyfarm.com

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Perfect Pony View Post
                          Well that is my pony to a T. The vet that did her PPE thought she was a really cool pony. His comment about her personality was "I think if you ask this pony in the "right" way, she will do anything for you". I never thought I would find a more inquisitive and adventurous horse/pony than my mare, but the Connemara has her beat by a mile. As an example I ground drove her last night around the 80 acre property I board on. When she saw a herd of deer in the bushes she picked up the trot and nearly drug me to them. I show her something once and that's that.

                          I bought her as an inexpensive project to play with for a while, but she has turned me into a huge Connemara fan.
                          Yep that's the textbook Connemara temperament

                          Reaction of: Ooh what is that?
                          Follow Closely By: Can I eat it?
                          *The Quietman ~ Irish Approved Gr.1 Stallion
                          www.windyislesfarms.com
                          Like Us on Facebook

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by carolprudm View Post
                            The two mares I am thinking about are well more than 1/2 TB but I attribute their issues more to bad training than to breeding. I've always thought Connemaras have a strong sense of justice and self preservation.
                            They do.

                            My Grandfather would always go on about a Connemara's sense of 'fairness.'
                            *The Quietman ~ Irish Approved Gr.1 Stallion
                            www.windyislesfarms.com
                            Like Us on Facebook

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              We breed some Connemaras and Connemara/Hanoverian crosses. We love them for smaller ladies because you keep the warmblood gaits in a smaller package. Here are some pictures of ones we have bred:
                              http://i1112.photobucket.com/albums/...ancyChamps.jpg Fancy This GCF (by Fred Astair out of a Connemara mare) who competed in the USEF/Markel Young Horse National Championships this year in the 5-Year-Old division. She is also scoring consistently in the 70's at First Level.
                              http://i1112.photobucket.com/albums/...s/IMG_5369.jpgBMW GCF- by Bonheur out of a Connemara Mare
                              http://i1112.photobucket.com/albums/...sses/GusEN.jpg Augustus Magee- A full Connemara yearling colt by Wildwych Don Juan (who we owned) out of Dark Horse Sparkle Plenty. We have kept him intact as a stallion prospect.
                              Sharon

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by Sassenach View Post
                                Reaction of: Ooh what is that?
                                Follow Closely By: Can I eat it?


                                As to what Carol is saying---sadly because they are so intelligent, brave, capable and athletic I think they can easily be overfaced if pushed up the levels to quickly---and just plain spoilt for it. They don't tend to 'forget' but are quite capable of forgiving if treated fairly and sensibly.

                                That being said they do thrive variety in their training and many have exceptional work ethics(They LOVE to work)---I think this is part of their nature and one of the reasons they excel in most disciplines.

                                Its one of the few breeds that I regularly see being trained/competed up the levels with an amatuer/junior rider.
                                Redbud Ranch
                                Check us out on FB

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                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by goodpony View Post


                                  As to what Carol is saying---sadly because they are so intelligent, brave, capable and athletic I think they can easily be overfaced if pushed up the levels to quickly---and just plain spoilt for it. They don't tend to 'forget' but are quite capable of forgiving if treated fairly and sensibly.
                                  That is indeed what I believe happened to Lotty. And also a case of "Why can't you be like your big sister Tilly?"

                                  When I was considering taking her I posted an inquiry on COTH of course and heard from someone who had seen her a few owners back and said some of the training sessions she saw were downright frightening

                                  My two mares were semi rescues, one free, one that I paid way more than she is worth to get her out of a bad situation. These two mares are no typical of a well handled ConnxTB
                                  Last edited by carolprudm; Oct. 30, 2010, 11:07 AM.
                                  I wasn't always a Smurf
                                  Penmerryl's Sophie RIDSH
                                  "I ain't as good as I once was but I'm as good once as I ever was"
                                  The ignore list is my friend. It takes 2 to argue.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by goodpony View Post

                                    Its one of the few breeds that I regularly see being trained/competed up the levels with an amatuer/junior rider.
                                    This is something that really drew me to my mare. Before her I rode all been there done that TB who know their job well. Buying a 2 year old was frightening!! I am glad to say I have done 98% of the riding. She has never bucked, reared, or thrown a fit under saddle. Her three year old year we gave her the winter off. Spring came and she went back into training like nothing happened. We threw her on the longe line for maybe 2 minutes before I hopped on her back. Never batted an eye lash. She was a VERY easy horse to start......specially for a baby.

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                                    • #19
                                      Originally posted by ch_sadie View Post
                                      She was a VERY easy horse to start......specially for a baby.
                                      This has been my personal experience as well---very very easy (born broke). I have several purebreds and partbreds and while they are all unique---they all have been very consistent in this respect. I do think that there is something to bloodlines/breeding though as there are certain lines known to present more of a challenge---once going though they tend to be exceptional performers. I think this is probably true of most super athletic young horses--regardless of breed.
                                      Redbud Ranch
                                      Check us out on FB

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                                      • #20
                                        Wow thanks for all the great replies. All of your horses look great. I am not sure who the dam or sire are. I need to email the seller when I get a chance. Life has just been crazy!! Ok a couple more questions. I love my TB but her spookiness is something I do not love. She isn't really spooky unless she is fresh or if it's really windy. I know all horses are unique but how are these crosses when it comes to spookiness? How long do these breeeds take to mature? I know warmbloods take longer than some. Is that true of the Connies as well? Again thank you soo much for all of your replies!!!

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